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NoobCruise
February 26th, 2012, 09:56 PM
Why does HAL have the double standard that you can bring wine on board, but not beer or hard liquor? It doesn't make sense to me, and not really fair. I'm not a bigger drinker (literally maybe a half dozen cocktails a year), but I would like to have a few drinks while enjoying my aft wrap-around verandah. Unfortunately, I am allergic to wine and less then half a glass will make me violently ill. It doesn't seem fair that I can't take a bottle of vodka or rum without smuggling it, while others are hauling cases of wine to their rooms :(

Katie333
February 26th, 2012, 10:07 PM
I think they could take the stance of zero alcohol because that's surely one of their biggest money makers.

I believe the 'justification' for wine/champagne vs. beer/liquor is because it's typical to use a bottle of wine/champagne to celebrate or toast a special occasion. Since many people celebrate special occasions while onboard a cruise (in fact it's the justification for the cruise in many cases), HAL probably figures they don't want to get in the way of someone having their favourite bottle on their anniversary.

RuthC
February 26th, 2012, 10:10 PM
Good news! You can purchase a bottle of whatever potent potable you like for in-cabin comsumption.
You can order it in advance, to have ready when you arrive, or purchase it from room service or any bar. If you purchase before (or have delivered before) sailing, there may be a state tax added to the cost.

Price is reasonable, and it's for a full litre bottle.

DaveOKC
February 26th, 2012, 10:12 PM
My GUESS, and thats all it is, is two reasons. First, HAL makes alot more money off of beer and liquor sales than wine. Second, if HAL allowed unlimited beer and liquor to be brought on-board, the number of disorderly passengers would increase significantly, which could be dangerous being on a moving ship in the middle of the ocean.

Anyone else have any thoughts/ideas?

DaveOKC

teachermandoug
February 26th, 2012, 10:20 PM
Not so. Wine is allowed because if you bring it to the dr corkage applies.
So they still make money.

BruceMuzz
February 26th, 2012, 11:07 PM
For most cruise lines it is not the revenue department that has prohibited passengers bringing alcohol onboard - it is the legal department.

If the issue was lost revenue, they would stop you from bringing water, soda, and juices as well. The biggest moneymaker on a ship is not alcohol, but water and sodas. But sodas and water do not cause people to get drunk, misbehave, and cause lawsuites against cruise lines.

Historically, the biggest trouble-makers on a ship have been the people who bring a case of tequila to 2 people to drink on a 7-day cruise - or those who leave all their clothing at home so they can fill their suitcases with cases of beer. These people (as a group) are the ones who have loud late-night parties in their cabins, disturbing their neighbors, damaging the cabins, getting into fights, and falling down, breaking bones (or going overboard). Those bringing bottles of wine onboard have behaved themselves for the most part, so the cruise lines do not have a good reason to stop them.

Remember that the Mass Market cruise lines do not look so much at individuals as they do at large numbers of individuals. Although you and I might like to bring a bottle of Scotch or a 6-pack to have a few drinks on the balcony, we are not representative of the masses, many of whom have caused trouble when given the chance.

It's always unfortunate when a relatively small group misbehaving results in everyone else suffering for it.

There is good news. The upscale cruise lines do not appeal to the ilk that has caused the problems on the mass market ships, and very few upscale cruisers have the need to carry their own alcohol on vacation. If you book an upscale cruise, you will not have any problems carrying on your own drinks.

dot73
February 26th, 2012, 11:25 PM
One of the reasons I cruise mainly on HAL is that there are no drunks on board. If there are drunks, they seem to be very well behaved. I have seen some drunks on another cruise line on a couple of 7-day cruises and it wasn't pretty. I find that the prices of drinks are reasoable on HAL compared to restaurants on land.

NoobCruise
February 26th, 2012, 11:26 PM
Thanks for your responses everyone :) I'm very glad to know we can pre-order a bottle to have in our room. I've seen a lot of people get pretty wasted on wine too, but I guess it's not generally the drink of choice for those with the spring break or frat house mentality lol

itzmered
February 26th, 2012, 11:50 PM
Thanks for your responses everyone :) I'm very glad to know we can pre-order a bottle to have in our room. I've seen a lot of people get pretty wasted on wine too, but I guess it's not generally the drink of choice for those with the spring break or frat house mentality lol

I don't know about that, back then our drink of choice was wine. Well if you want to actually call Mogan David or TJ Swan wine :p

IndyDenise
February 27th, 2012, 05:33 AM
[
It's always unfortunate when a relatively small group misbehaving results in everyone else suffering for it.

There is good news. The upscale cruise lines do not appeal to the ilk that has caused the problems on the mass market ships, and very few upscale cruisers have the need to carry their own alcohol on vacation. If you book an upscale cruise, you will not have any problems carrying on your own drinks.[/quote]

---------------------

I found it strange that Disney ( off all lines ) let's you bring alcohol on board . You just have to carry it on with you!

GeriatricNurse
February 27th, 2012, 07:27 AM
[
It's always unfortunate when a relatively small group misbehaving results in everyone else suffering for it.

There is good news. The upscale cruise lines do not appeal to the ilk that has caused the problems on the mass market ships, and very few upscale cruisers have the need to carry their own alcohol on vacation. If you book an upscale cruise, you will not have any problems carrying on your own drinks.

---------------------

I found it strange that Disney ( off all lines ) let's you bring alcohol on board . You just have to carry it on with you!

[/quote]

Well, according to the 'Disney Cruise Line Alcohol Policy', ONE bottle of (unopened) wine OR champagne, as well as SIX cans OR bottles of beer, PER PERSON, may be brought onboard (with you)! ;) Seems fairly restrictive to me! :eek:

FLACRUISER99
February 27th, 2012, 07:55 AM
---------------------

I found it strange that Disney ( off all lines ) let's you bring alcohol on board . You just have to carry it on with you!



Well, according to the 'Disney Cruise Line Alcohol Policy', ONE bottle of (unopened) wine OR champagne, as well as SIX cans OR bottles of beer, PER PERSON, may be brought onboard (with you)! ;) Seems fairly restrictive to me! :eek:[/quote]This is incorrect see Disney web site: http://disneycruise.disney.go.com/faqs/beverage-policy/alcohol-policy-onboard/ (http://disneycruise.disney.go.com/faqs/beverage-policy/alcohol-policy-onboard/)

Halfmoonfan
February 27th, 2012, 08:25 AM
In the United States a fair amount of fine restaurants allow diners to bring a bottle of wine to a meal and then charge a corkage fee. I have never seen one allow a diner to bring beer or liquor. So I think the practice is a common one to allow wine.

bdmarine
February 27th, 2012, 08:50 AM
Interesting reasons for allowing wine on board. I did ask a hotel manager on HAL during a session with CC members why wine was allowed. His response was that there are so many different varieties and vintages of wine that the ship could not supply the needs of the discerning passenger.

As far as not allowing spirits and beer, I subscribe to the corporate greed motive. I don't think that allowing customers to bring on their own spirits and beer would suddenly turn HAL into the all night party line. The fact remains that HAL and most cruise lines make much more money on alcohol than any stateside bar on land. This is because HAL pays no taxes on their spirits; yet they still sell their cocktails at the same 6 or 7 dollar prices bars get near my home. This also applies to the "reasonably" proced bottles you can get delivered to your cabin. They pay $7.50 for a liter of duty free Myers run and happily sell it to you for $29. Perhaps some think that making this kind of money is by accident and that there are other motives. Those are probably the same people who feel their salaries are incidental and not necessary to their jobs.

Boytjie
February 27th, 2012, 10:44 AM
As far as not allowing spirits and beer, I subscribe to the corporate greed motive.

Some call it capatalism... making a profit.... :rolleyes:

The fact remains that HAL and most cruise lines make much more money on alcohol than any stateside bar on land. This is because HAL pays no taxes on their spirits; yet they still sell their cocktails at the same 6 or 7 dollar prices bars get near my home. This also applies to the "reasonably" proced bottles you can get delivered to your cabin. They pay $7.50 for a liter of duty free Myers run and happily sell it to you for $29. Perhaps some think that making this kind of money is by accident and that there are other motives. Those are probably the same people who feel their salaries are incidental and not necessary to their jobs.

And where did you get all these facts?

sail7seas
February 27th, 2012, 10:52 AM
Interesting reasons for allowing wine on board. I did ask a hotel manager on HAL during a session with CC members why wine was allowed. His response was that there are so many different varieties and vintages of wine that the ship could not supply the needs of the discerning passenger.

As far as not allowing spirits and beer, I subscribe to the corporate greed motive. I don't think that allowing customers to bring on their own spirits and beer would suddenly turn HAL into the all night party line. The fact remains that HAL and most cruise lines make much more money on alcohol than any stateside bar on land. This is because HAL pays no taxes on their spirits; yet they still sell their cocktails at the same 6 or 7 dollar prices bars get near my home. This also applies to the "reasonably" proced bottles you can get delivered to your cabin. They pay $7.50 for a liter of duty free Myers run and happily sell it to you for $29. Perhaps some think that making this kind of money is by accident and that there are other motives. Those are probably the same people who feel their salaries are incidental and not necessary to their jobs.


Liquor sales and other on board spending allow so many cruisers to pay such very low fares. The cruise lines have to make the money here or make it there but they are 'for profit' businesses. They sell many of the low category cabins quite reasonably in order to fill the ship and they then have to try and get everyone to open their tight wallets while on the ship.

No secret about that....... it's been well explained many times.

Laurie S.
February 27th, 2012, 12:34 PM
HAL should do like Carnival and only allow one bottle of wine per person. They are discriminating against those of us who prefer beer! The price is outrageous for a bottle of beer on board.

RuthC
February 27th, 2012, 02:58 PM
HAL should do like Carnival and only allow one bottle of wine per person. They are discriminating against those of us who prefer beer!
And limiting what others can bring aboard, while you still can't bring beer aboard, helps you how?????

Mary Ellen
February 27th, 2012, 03:08 PM
HAL should do like Carnival and only allow one bottle of wine per person. They are discriminating against those of us who prefer beer! The price is outrageous for a bottle of beer on board.I agree with Ruth, I don't see what this would get you. Carnival has so many short cruises (3-4 days) with about 10 days being a long one for them. Ten days on HAL is short for a lot of us. Apples and oranges.

Laurie S.
February 27th, 2012, 04:49 PM
And limiting what others can bring aboard, while you still can't bring beer aboard, helps you how?????

I won't be subsidizing their cruises with my alcohol purchases! :D

And, it will reduce the potential of wild partying by the wine drinkers.

Laurie S.
February 27th, 2012, 04:50 PM
I agree with Ruth, I don't see what this would get you. Carnival has so many short cruises (3-4 days) with about 10 days being a long one for them. Ten days on HAL is short for a lot of us. Apples and oranges.

Not apples and oranges. I just did a 13-day B2B on Carnival. I would never do a three to four day cruise. Why bother?

jtl513
February 27th, 2012, 04:57 PM
I would never do a three to four day cruise. Why bother?When you can drive to the port (Canaveral) in 30 minutes, it can be a fun 3 > 4 getaway. :D

Mary Ellen
February 27th, 2012, 05:16 PM
Not apples and oranges. I just did a 13-day B2B on Carnival. I would never do a three to four day cruise. Why bother?Yes, that was a b2b. You don't have to do that on HAL to get a longer cruise. Carnival has nothing remotely close to HAL's Grand Voyages. Apples and oranges. Still.

BruceMuzz
February 27th, 2012, 06:06 PM
Interesting reasons for allowing wine on board. I did ask a hotel manager on HAL during a session with CC members why wine was allowed. His response was that there are so many different varieties and vintages of wine that the ship could not supply the needs of the discerning passenger.

As far as not allowing spirits and beer, I subscribe to the corporate greed motive. I don't think that allowing customers to bring on their own spirits and beer would suddenly turn HAL into the all night party line. The fact remains that HAL and most cruise lines make much more money on alcohol than any stateside bar on land. This is because HAL pays no taxes on their spirits; yet they still sell their cocktails at the same 6 or 7 dollar prices bars get near my home. This also applies to the "reasonably" proced bottles you can get delivered to your cabin. They pay $7.50 for a liter of duty free Myers run and happily sell it to you for $29. Perhaps some think that making this kind of money is by accident and that there are other motives. Those are probably the same people who feel their salaries are incidental and not necessary to their jobs.

I must agree with your corporate greed motive so far as cruise lines go - at least generally speaking.
But if corporate greed was fueling this idea, why would any cruise line allow passengers to bring on unlimited quantities of the beverage items that make by far the greatest profit for the company; sodas and water? It just doesn't make sense.

Allowing passengers to bring on alcohol doesn't really turn any cruise line into an all night party. But it does dramatically increase the number of lawsuits brought by drunks and their victims.
Remember my earlier post. It is NOT the Corporate Revenue Department making these rules in order to increase revenues. The Corporate Legal Department is driving this in order to decrease legal costs.

You may also be surprised to learn that much of the alcohol purchased by a cruise line is NOT Duty or Tax Free. The goofy alcohol laws in the USA make it very difficult and often very expensive to purchase and store duty free alcohol in US Government Bonded Warehouses. It is often much easier, faster, and less expensive for a cruise line loading alcohol in the USA to purchase it from the same wholesaler that land-based bars use. Buying it that way forces the cruise line to pay the same taxes the local bars pay. On top of that, the cruise line still has to pay additional fees to get it into the duty free zone for loading.
This old grandma story about cruise lines buying alcohol for next to nothing is just that - a grandma story. It was true many years ago, but the US Government saw an opportunity to get more taxes out of cruise lines - and took it.

When I managed beverage operations in land-based hotels in the USA, we were doing well if our cost of sales was under 14%.
A cruise line considers itself successful with beverage sales when costs are under 21%. Since we charge prices similar to land-based prices, our costs are 50% higher than our competitors on land.

Laurie S.
February 27th, 2012, 09:29 PM
Yes, that was a b2b. You don't have to do that on HAL to get a longer cruise. Carnival has nothing remotely close to HAL's Grand Voyages. Apples and oranges. Still.

What does a longer cruise have to do with allowing multiple bottles of wine (or cases) being brought on and not allowing beer drinkers to bring their own, also? It's discrimination.

Mary Ellen
February 27th, 2012, 11:25 PM
What does a longer cruise have to do with allowing multiple bottles of wine (or cases) being brought on and not allowing beer drinkers to bring their own, also? It's discrimination.You stated that you want HAL to limit the wine to one bottle just like Carnival. My point is that they are different cruises.

Are you also claiming discrimination because HAL also allows non drinkers to sail with them? Not only that, they list (and provide space for) Friends of Bill meetings each day. Following your logic you're also subsidizing them and thus shouldn't be allowed. :eek:

Bottom line - if one wants to sail on a line following the regulations of Carnival Cruise Line, then maybe sailing on Carnival would be best for them. :)

bdmarine
February 28th, 2012, 08:46 AM
Brucemuzz makes some good points. However, not only are there lots of bonded warehouses in Ft Lauderdale and other ports, but the ship can purchase and load their alcohol in other ports that are not so restrictive. I will simply ask passengers to do as I did and examine the bottles in the cocktail lounges and count how many tax stamps you see.

richwmn
February 28th, 2012, 09:20 AM
Brucemuzz makes some good points. However, not only are there lots of bonded warehouses in Ft Lauderdale and other ports, but the ship can purchase and load their alcohol in other ports that are not so restrictive. I will simply ask passengers to do as I did and examine the bottles in the cocktail lounges and count how many tax stamps you see.
And how many tax stamps do you see at your local store? Federal tax stamps went away in 1985, and I don't remember seeing any GA stamps in quite a while either.

michmike
February 28th, 2012, 09:57 AM
With the availability of "rum runners" it is easy as can be to bring alcohol on board in your luggage if you so choose. Sure, you're breaking the "rules", but try driving 70 on the interstate and not get run over....

No amount of grousing is going to change the policy. So then you need to decide whether to abide by it or resort to subterfuge. Admittedly, that doesn't offer much help to the beer drinkers. But hey.. I enjoy my Knob Creek on my balcony.

CMHCruiseCouple
February 28th, 2012, 10:34 AM
Interesting reasons for allowing wine on board. I did ask a hotel manager on HAL during a session with CC members why wine was allowed. His response was that there are so many different varieties and vintages of wine that the ship could not supply the needs of the discerning passenger.


This is similar for Princess. They have a decent wine list, but not close to a land based wine cellar.

Princess has no charge for bringing your own "cabin wine," but they do have a $15 corkage fee in the MDR or up charge restaurants. Think of it: Lines make $15 (or more) for pulling a cork. No inventory, breakage or bad corks. Pure profit.

Cheers!

Boatdrill
February 28th, 2012, 10:58 AM
The restrictions on bringing wine and spirits onboard have to with liquor licenses.

Not "corporate greed".

MadManOfBethesda
February 28th, 2012, 11:20 AM
For most cruise lines it is not the revenue department that has prohibited passengers bringing alcohol onboard - it is the legal department.

If the issue was lost revenue, they would stop you from bringing water, soda, and juices as well. The biggest moneymaker on a ship is not alcohol, but water and sodas. But sodas and water do not cause people to get drunk, misbehave, and cause lawsuites against cruise lines.

There are a couple of major flaws with your position. For one, a glass of wine and a bottle of beer (not to mention a shot of liquor) contain virtually the same amount of alcohol. Secondly, if this was a liability issue rather than revenue issue, then HAL is going about it in a strange manner by selling passengers as many bottle of liquor as they want to have delivered to their cabin. If anything, this would increase their liability for problems caused by drunk and disorderly passengers if they were the provider of the spirits rather than having the passengers bringing their own on board.

Boytjie
February 28th, 2012, 11:26 AM
With the availability of "rum runners" it is easy as can be to bring alcohol on board in your luggage if you so choose. Sure, you're breaking the "rules", but try driving 70 on the interstate and not get run over....

So why bother following any rules or laws? ;)

Boytjie
February 28th, 2012, 11:28 AM
This is similar for Princess. They have a decent wine list, but not close to a land based wine cellar.

Princess has no charge for bringing your own "cabin wine," but they do have a $15 corkage fee in the MDR or up charge restaurants. Think of it: Lines make $15 (or more) for pulling a cork. No inventory, breakage or bad corks. Pure profit.

Sometimes it's just a twist. ;)

Boytjie
February 28th, 2012, 11:29 AM
The restrictions on bringing wine and spirits onboard have to with liquor licenses.

Not "corporate greed".

Who licenses cruise ships? :confused:

And how does that explain the different policies between different cruise lines?

Viesczy
February 28th, 2012, 11:34 AM
BruceMuzz may have some valid points that it is a legal concern, but look their prices compared to retail to know the reason.

$39.10 for a bottle of Bacardi & 3 cans of soda. The same rum here in PA goes for $14.99.

$39.10 for Jim Beam & 3 cans of Coca-Cola. Jim Beam runs $18.99 in PA.

$34.50 for a bottle of Smirnoff or Stolichnaya. Smirnoff is $8.99 to $14.99, Stolichnaya is $10.99 to $19.99 in PA.

Derek

Laurie S.
February 28th, 2012, 12:13 PM
You stated that you want HAL to limit the wine to one bottle just like Carnival. My point is that they are different cruises.

Are you also claiming discrimination because HAL also allows non drinkers to sail with them? Not only that, they list (and provide space for) Friends of Bill meetings each day. Following your logic you're also subsidizing them and thus shouldn't be allowed. :eek:

Bottom line - if one wants to sail on a line following the regulations of Carnival Cruise Line, then maybe sailing on Carnival would be best for them. :)


No, that's twisted logic. Nondrinkers have nothing to do with this. The discrimination is that wine drinkers can bring on as much as they want and not have to purchase overpriced drinks, cans of beer, or bottles of liquor on the ship.

I can handle the liquor with rumrunners (and I don't care what anyone thinks of that, btw) and I also purchase drink cards for my boyfriend and me. In fact, I'll be buying $200 in drink cards for our upcoming Noordam cruise, which primarily will be used for beer. But, we can't bring beer on and we can't put it in a rumrunner. I cringe at the price of a glass or can of beer onboard. How much wine would that $200 buy?

m steve
February 28th, 2012, 12:25 PM
HAL doesn't check every bag for alcohol like some other lines do. Just pack a bottle carefully in your checked bag. In 20 cruises we have never been stopped. We do prefer to use platic bottles to avoid the weight and breakage. We've packed them with our boxes of wine. I don't begrudge the corkage fee and we usually have a drink in one of the bars before and after dinner so they get revenue from us. We limit drinks we supply to our cabin. Many others seem to do this as well.

Boytjie
February 28th, 2012, 12:33 PM
I cringe at the price of a glass or can of beer onboard.

You cringe? Really? I don't think the beer prices are outrageous, nor the alcoholic drinks. Then again, I live in New York :D

My biggest issue with beer on HAL is the selection (or lack of). I don't fret too much over what a drink costs me onboard - I am on vacation and that's when one can splurge. I seldom drink beer on a HAL cruise, I save that for ports of call where I try something local. That can be hit or miss but that's part of the fun. Like the Mango IPA n St. Thomas... I am not a big fan of fruity beers but that one was actually not bad.

MadManOfBethesda
February 28th, 2012, 01:26 PM
I agree with Ruth, I don't see what this would get you. Carnival has so many short cruises (3-4 days) with about 10 days being a long one for them. Ten days on HAL is short for a lot of us. Apples and oranges.

I, too, agree with Ruth that Laura's "solution" wouldn't help her in the least. The equitable solution would be to allow passengers to bring beer on board, not to limit the amount of wine allowable. However, your apples-to-oranges response doesn't make any sense either. To take your example to its logical conclusion, for an apples-to-apples comparison, HAL should allow fewer bottles of wine on shorter cruises than it does on longer voyages.

The fact of the matter is that wine is considered a more socially-acceptable potable whereas beer drinkers are looked down upon. There really is no other reason for beer to be banned as a carryon. It's not simply a revenue issue because HAL is losing a significant amount of revenue by allowing passengers to bring cases of wine on board. And as I noted in an earlier post, since there is no difference in alcoholic content between a glass of wine and a bottle of beer, that whole legal liability issue that another poster brought up is not supportable by the facts either.

Laurie S.
February 28th, 2012, 02:24 PM
I, too, agree with Ruth that Laura's "solution" wouldn't help her in the least. The equitable solution would be to allow passengers to bring beer on board, not to limit the amount of wine allowable. However, your apples-to-oranges response doesn't make any sense either. To take your example to its logical conclusion, for an apples-to-apples comparison, HAL should allow fewer bottles of wine on shorter cruises than it does on longer voyages.

The fact of the matter is that wine is considered a more socially-acceptable potable whereas beer drinkers are looked down upon. There really is no other reason for beer to be banned as a carryon. It's not simply a revenue issue because HAL is losing a significant amount of revenue by allowing passengers to bring cases of wine on board. And as I noted in an earlier post, since there is no difference in alcoholic content between a glass of wine and a bottle of beer, that whole legal liability issue that another poster brought up is not supportable by the facts either.


Exactly! Someone finally go it! :D:D:D

Laurie S.
February 28th, 2012, 02:26 PM
You cringe? Really? I don't think the beer prices are outrageous, nor the alcoholic drinks. Then again, I live in New York :D

My biggest issue with beer on HAL is the selection (or lack of). I don't fret too much over what a drink costs me onboard - I am on vacation and that's when one can splurge. I seldom drink beer on a HAL cruise, I save that for ports of call where I try something local. That can be hit or miss but that's part of the fun. Like the Mango IPA n St. Thomas... I am not a big fan of fruity beers but that one was actually not bad.


I live in Tucson and Mexico, beer is cheap here, and better. ;)

Yeah, the variety is really limited and that's the biggest part of the problem that beer drinkers face. After we finish diving at each port, we make sure to taste the local beers. Well, maybe more than just taste...

michmike
February 28th, 2012, 02:48 PM
[QUOTE=m steve;32646555]HAL doesn't check every bag for alcohol like some other lines do. Just pack a bottle carefully in your checked bag. In 20 cruises we have never been stopped. We do prefer to use platic bottles to avoid the weight and breakage. We've packed them with our boxes of wine. I don't begrudge the corkage fee and we usually have a drink in one of the bars before and after dinner so they get revenue from us. We limit drinks we supply to our cabin. Many others seem to do this as well.[/QUOTE

We do as Steve does. The booze we bring onboard is for in cabin consumption. We don't fill a travel mug and wander the ship. We still spend plenty in the bars. Just irked by the discrimination in favor of the oenophiles, so we deal with it as we see fit. And others are certainly entitled to their opinion of that.. (as if..)

Boytjie
February 28th, 2012, 03:41 PM
After we finish diving at each port, we make sure to taste the local beers. Well, maybe more than just taste...

It's a good way to get rid of that regulator taste in your mouth. :D

That's what I used the Mango IPA for. ;)

Laurie S.
February 28th, 2012, 04:29 PM
It's a good way to get rid of that regulator taste in your mouth. :D

That's what I used the Mango IPA for. ;)

You bet! A little salsa warms you up, too. :D

Boytjie
February 28th, 2012, 04:49 PM
You bet! A little salsa warms you up, too. :D

I prefer some fried sea life :D

Laurie S.
February 28th, 2012, 05:32 PM
Can't argue with that. :)

Typhoon1
February 28th, 2012, 07:15 PM
Cruise lines are in business to make money. It's all about increasing revenue for the company.