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infopaul
March 6th, 2006, 06:44 PM
Does anyone have a cure for motion sickness? I have heard of a few different methods. Being an avid scuba diver and having a good pair of sea legs, I do not get seasick (at least so far). I have gotten nauseous while diving in a surge, but that's about it (this info might apply to whoozie divers as well).

My wife is a little more prone to seasickness onboard while the ship goes thru rough sea's. She has tried different methods, some working better than others. If you find yourself feeling the squeeze, my wife told me to tell you to try this: "granny smith apples".

I don't know why it helps, but I noticed it does. She started bringing half a dozen or so apples (granny smith) with her on our cruises. I don't think they have them on HAL or some of the other cruiselines, if you know different please post it. As a precaution, she brings her own supply. She says to eat one in the morning. Hoping this natural cure helps someone...Paul:)

jcg
March 6th, 2006, 06:55 PM
to sea sickness. But, I wasn't. The first morning I had nothing to eat by 0900. One minute I was fine and the next I was extremely sick to my stomach. Later, others said the best thing to do is to keep food on your stomach. After that morning, I ordered room service or went to the Lido earlier than 0900 and didn't have anymore sea sickness. I heard about the green apples on the cruise, too. Maybe her trick is she eats it in the morning before the sickness sets in.

Jan

caribbean dreams
March 6th, 2006, 07:04 PM
I am originally from Alaska so needless to say, i took alot of ferry rides through the rough water of the sound to get to other towns, I found that ginger helped me and also wintermint gum, I never really got a bad case of seasickness, just an upset tummy but these things helped me.

lougee1043
March 6th, 2006, 08:10 PM
bonine or the generic meclizene --bought 100 tabs for under 10 bucks at safeway

RevNeal
March 6th, 2006, 09:03 PM
For High Seas I swear by Scopace. It's the oral form of the "patch." Much easier to control dosage.

infopaul
March 6th, 2006, 09:09 PM
jcg,

It's the granny smith apples in particular that has the properties that settles motion sickness. She eats one when she feels the onset on nausea and again in the morning...Paul:)

gizmodog
March 6th, 2006, 09:19 PM
about ten droppers of liquid ginger in a cup of hot water works miracles.

mildavis
March 6th, 2006, 09:28 PM
yes, ginger root does work and is natural and doesn't make you feel funny. You can buy ginger root capsules at your local health food store and there are articles on the web about this. Also, read up on this, because it seems I did read something about ginger and people on blood thinners. Not real sure about this but it doesn't hurt to be sure and careful. I have never heard about the granny smith apples but I will check it out. I don't usually get seasick but I like to take something that first night out until I get my sea legs.

infopaul
March 6th, 2006, 09:31 PM
The wife says, she feels better in about a half hour and she can "drink" after that. Can you drink after taking those type of medicines or will they make you drowsey? I'm thinking of keeping some motion sickness med. in my scuba diving med kit...Paul:)

caribbean dreams,

Ginger is that gum or something else?...Paul:)

sirdavid
March 7th, 2006, 08:50 AM
Rev Neal....I am going on my first cruise March 23 Volendam....I don't know if I suffer from Motion sickness....do you take the "Scopace" if and when the sea gets rought? or do you take it all the time? I did buy some ginger caps.
Thank you

bluegrass grannie
March 7th, 2006, 10:26 AM
On our recent Ryndam (1/22-2/5) Caribbean cruise, high seas as we returned to Tampa caused alot of motion sickness (however nothing like the 42' seas the Noordam encountered--I can't even imagine that).:eek: Our concierge suggested the green apples, saltines and gingerale and room service delivered those items to me.

I confess that I didn't try the apples as one bite of the crackers made the situation worse. A couple of dramamines (non-drowsy) helped enough that I made it through the evening. My patches were sitting in the drawer but it was too late to use one when we encountered the rough seas. I think next time I will try Rev. Neal's pills!

DesertDiva
March 7th, 2006, 12:31 PM
Meclizine (Antivert, Bonine, Dramamine II) is a histamine receptor blocker medication that is sold over the counter. Meclizine acts on brain centers that control nausea, vomiting, and dizziness. Even with over the counter medications, it is best to research (or talk with your doctor) possible side effects and drug interactions with other medications.

The Transderm Scop patch works by reducing the activity of nerve fibers in the inner ear. The active ingredient in the patch (scopolamine) is also produced by another company in pill form. You will need to visit with your doctor and obtain a prescription.

For me, I've only had one occasion where I've felt "queasy" on a ship. The seas were classified as "high" and it was during dinner. I felt like I was on the edge of being seasick. I took some Bonine and within the hour felt better. However, I had a cabinmate once who started taking Meclizine the moment she stepped on the ship and continued it daily until the end of the cruise.

Here's an article on seasickness (http://www.hmlanding.com/maldemar.htm) that might be helpful.

RevNeal
March 7th, 2006, 12:48 PM
Rev Neal....I am going on my first cruise March 23 Volendam....I don't know if I suffer from Motion sickness....do you take the "Scopace" if and when the sea gets rought? or do you take it all the time? I did buy some ginger caps.

I generally only have trouble when the seas are stronger than "moderate." The gentle motion that one usually encounters at sea doesn't bother my inner-ear, but anything more and I can get really dizzy and, hence, sick.

Here is what I generally do: I take a pill about an hour before port departure, and then wait to see how things go. If the seas appear to be getting rough, and/or I feel the least bit nauseated, I follow the dosage directions -- twice a day (once in the morning and once about an hour before dinner) -- throughout the rough portions of the cruise. It has been my experience that Scopace WILL help if one is already sea sick, but one has to (1) keep it down so it will dissolve into your blood stream, and (2) give it time to act. It takes about an hour to act.

For most people the worst thing they can do is go to their cabin and lay down ... but for me that is precisely what works. So long as I am horizontal I can take ANY wave action ... I just don't get sea sick if I'm horizontal. If I am sea sick and I can get horizontal I do and, in about 15 minutes, the nausea dissipates. But, then, I'm strange in my reactions (and in other things :) )

mildavis
March 7th, 2006, 03:01 PM
I have been on several caribbean cruises and we have had some rough seas and i have been ok. We are getting ready to take an Alaska inside passage in June. To me, I would think this would be very very calm compared to the caribbean. Am I correct?

PrincessYoga
March 7th, 2006, 04:04 PM
Can you drink on the tablets? Cheers

FoxyTerrier
March 7th, 2006, 04:25 PM
about ten droppers of liquid ginger in a cup of hot water works miracles.

Does anyone know where you can find liquid ginger?

My son has started getting his private pilots license and after many cruises and commercial air flight he has started getting air sickness.

Joni

buffy4454
March 7th, 2006, 06:51 PM
Well I will admit it, on our last cruise I was sick as a dog one day.

We were on the Maasdam out of Norfolk to the Caribbean. I think it was the second day at sea and we had gone to see a lecture. As soon as we walked out I realized that I needed fresh air and quick. I made it to our room and several hours later when my poor husband was about starved we ordered room service.

HAL has a special section on their room service menu for those not feeling well. It was beef broth, saltines, green apples, hot tea, boiled chicken and white rice. I thought for sure I wouldn't be able to eat anything but the broth tasted sooooo good. Next thing I knew I had eaten the broth and some chicken and rice. It was the most delicious sick food I have ever eaten.

We went to the ship store shortly after and bought Bonine. I took it every other day before bed and felt fine the rest of the cruise. Even the second to last night when nobody was in the Crow's Nest and the band members took turns in the men's room. I finally figured out that everyone was sea sick.

infopaul
March 7th, 2006, 10:54 PM
Has anyone tried the wrist bands with the little marble thing at your pressure point (sea bands)?...Paul:)

carolmacey
March 8th, 2006, 09:24 AM
bonine or the generic meclizene --bought 100 tabs for under 10 bucks at safeway
If you are a Costco member, I bought 100 for under $4.

noblepa
March 8th, 2006, 11:32 AM
One step you can take to reduce your chances of getting motion sickness is to stay in places where you can see the horizon. Either outside, on deck, a balcony, or where there are windows will help. Your eye/brain latches on to the horizon as a point of reference and you won't notice the motion as much. If you feel the onset of queasiness, find a window or step outside. It may help.

Of course, this isn't always possible and it isn't infallible, so the remedies mentioned by others are probably a wise precaution.

Paul Noble

melmarine
March 9th, 2006, 07:03 AM
Has anyone tried the wrist bands with the little marble thing at your pressure point (sea bands)?...Paul:)

Hi Paul! I wondered why no one mentioned them. Yes they do seem to work especially for kids who don't mind that they are rather unattractive. My son (11) carries his in his pocket the whole time he's on a cruise, it he starts to feel queasy he puts them on and leaves them on until the seas calm down. My daughter doesn't mind pills and she says gravol works the best. Of course she says the bands are ugly and wouldn't be caught dead wearing them. We even use the bracelets on long car trips. It helps my son from being car sick. Last summer we went whale watching in Mass. and wore them then too. I don't know if it's psychological or really causes a physical reaction but it's a good way to help the queasiness without adding another chemical to our bodies. Of course the ability to have a cocktail with them on is a definite perk.

woodburykt
March 9th, 2006, 11:29 AM
My friends cannot figure out why I love cruising so much when I'm pretty queasy on the seas. Of course my simple answer is that I love cruising and I'm not going to let seasickness stop me from enjoying it.

I've used the patch for all my cruises and aside from a dry mouth and feeling drowsy, for the most part, I was all right.

Now....a few years ago on the Oosterdam, I had to leave the dining room before my main course was served because the seas were pretty rough. What a long, long walk to my cabin that was. Our table was right on the stern, by the windows and here's me with a napkin to my mouth moving rather swiftly to get out of the DR....the looks I got from some were priceless I have to admit. When I got back to our cabin, our fantastic cabin steward, Rudy was touching up and said, "Mr. Keith, what happened?" I told him I was not feeling well and he rushed around and got me some seasick pills and some Granny Smith apples. He was truly the best cabin steward we've ever had and I'll never forget how sincerely nice he was and how helpful he was. The next day I was fine, the seas were smooth as glass, and I had an awesome time.

After that, my partner bought me the top of the line wrist band for our Westerdam cruise. I was ready, I had the patch, I had the wrist band, and I had bonine just in case. The wrist band worked! It takes some getting used to...little pulses every few seconds on a certain part of the wrist...but it worked! I don't have the exact brand name at the moment, I'm at work right now goofing off, but if anyone needs to know the exact name/brand of this band, let me know.

We're in the process of planning our next cruise for next Feb and I have no fear of seasickness anymore.

Oceanwench
March 9th, 2006, 12:00 PM
On the first cruises I took, in the early 90s, I got seasick as soon as the ship set sail. I used some kind of prescription meds and was knocked out the first night! Awful!

On my more recent cruises I have used the wristbands. They are wonderful! I don't think it's psychological ... believe me, I was very skeptical when I put the things on and thought for sure they would NOT work.

I wear them for the first night and day on the ship, then I take them off [in time for formal night!] and I am fine. If there are rough seas, I put them back on at bedtime.
Our last cruise, aboard the Westerdam in November, we had very rough seas as we tried to outrun a tropical storm. Waves that lifted the ship up, then slammed her down. Waves in the 27-foot range.
I was fine!

Last May we took our daughters and their boyfriends on the Zuiderdam for a week. One of the boys got seasick the first night, so I gave him a set of wristbands to wear. He was fine shortly after.

The following day he took them off before showering for dinner, then came to dinner without them. As dinner progressed, he got sicker and sicker ... left the table to go back to his cabin to get the wristbands. He put them on and was fine the rest of the week.

I believe the brand is Sea Bands and they can be bought at any drugstore.

Oceanwench
March 9th, 2006, 12:01 PM
double post!

infopaul
March 11th, 2006, 10:14 PM
Hi melmarine, I wanted to ask you about the gravol, I needed something to put into my scuba med kit when I go diving and was curious if that med made your daughter drowsy. Is it over the counter?...Paul:)

Loralu
March 12th, 2006, 01:11 AM
I use Bonine - take it when I get to my cabin the first day and every morning after..works great! I don't know if I would get seasick, and don't want to find out. My mom travels with me and she uses the patch, neither of us have ever had a problem, and our Zuiderdam cruise was pretty rough.

rickcohen2
March 12th, 2006, 03:26 AM
mildavis: .... Alaska inside passage in June. To me, I would think this would be very very calm compared to the caribbean. Am I correct?


My DW is prone to this problem. The first time it happened was on an Alaskan inside passage cruise on the old Rotterdam V. It was coming out of the passage, on the way to Sitka, that it hit. She went to the cabin and found the steward. He quickly escorted her out of there to the deck and returned with green apples and a can of gingerale. Before long there were six of our party of 14 out on chairs eatting green apples and drinking gingerale. Everyone seemed to recover quickly. It works!

Since that experience, she has starting taking meclazine before even boarding. She has never had the same problem, except the one time she thought she no longer needed her dosage. She found out otherwise and has since been diligent in taking it every morning. She's perfect now. ;)

Vic The Parrot
March 12th, 2006, 04:25 AM
Ginger ale, or CocaCola

Both work like a charm.
Oh, and someone here asked about drinking .... don't. Alcohol is the worst thing you can have in your stomach if you're seasick.

Heard all the jokes about it ... as in, "Have a few more shots, you'll walk straight!"


And the best advice .... Never eat anything you can't keep down


;)

PrincessYoga
March 12th, 2006, 08:37 AM
Cheers for the answer, Vic. THat was me that asked about the drinking with the sea sickness medicine. Hope the seas are come I will be able to have a glass of wine or an apple martini but if not strictly ginger ale for me.

watchdiva
March 12th, 2006, 09:54 AM
DH is a scuba diver and we swear by Triptone which is mainly sold through Dive Shops. We have taken them along with us on our last 3 cruises and they work like a charm. No drowsiness whatsover, no dry mouth, etc.

I've been trying to buy more (they come in a box of 15) for our upcoming trip on the Westerdam and all the dive shops are back-ordered on it!:eek:

We'll take along Bonine just in case.........

sail7seas
March 12th, 2006, 10:44 AM
The sea bands absolutely do work for many people.

Our closest friends love to cruise. She always got seasick. He is an Internist M.D. He tried every prescription you can name for her and she always had some seasickness on every cruise.

When sea bands first became available, she and I were on the phone talking about them. He heard us and laughed. I asked 'her' to put him on the phone. I asked......"So, can they hurt her in any way?" He....No, of course, not. So, have you tried everything in your bag of tricks trying to help her? He.....Yes, of course. So......what is there to lose by her trying them. $10??

He......Okay, get her some.

I did. She used them. She was fine. He......it was in her head!!

Me: In her head? Then why didn't everything you prescribed for her do any good. If it was 'placebo effect', why didn't anything else she tried have a 'placebo effect'? He.....okay, so I guess they do work for some people. She has never had another episode of seasickness.

BUT they must be used/placed exactly as directed. I see some people with a band on one wrist only. That will not work. You must wear them on both wrists and they must be placed on the wrist where directed. If you wear them halfway up your arm, they will not work. They work on accupressure and the pressure point must be placed where it will be effective.

ldog
March 12th, 2006, 12:07 PM
I've used the wrist bands for 15 years and they are wonderful! I carry them in my purse and use them for car trips too.

I tried the patch once and it made me so dizzy that I was bouncing off the walls.

jan

anley
March 12th, 2006, 02:04 PM
DON'T TAKE ANYTHING FOR GRANTED , the only time I got seasick in 6 cruises, some in really rough seas was inside passage in Alaska. So forewarned is forearmed.
Happy Seas
Anley:):)

infopaul
March 12th, 2006, 03:20 PM
watchdiva,
When we are traveling to a site in rough seas I begin to feel nauseous but once in the water and descending the feeling goes away. It's very rare when I get seasick, but when I scuba in heavy seas and I do a safety stop or when i'm sufacing I have gotten nauseous. I did have a couple of pills the pharmacist had given me that was perfect, no drowsiness or any other side effect. I will get the Triptone, but the Bonine has me curious about it's effect. When you take it what was the effect better or worse than Triptone ie. drowiness, dry mouth. The Bonine is easily available here and I wondered if it was a good substitute...Paul:)

sail7seas
March 12th, 2006, 03:51 PM
The active ingredient in Bonine is meclizine. The ship's front office usually has meclizine available when seas are rough and they will give them to you on request.

cheetah
March 12th, 2006, 07:42 PM
You will likely find green apples and dry crackers in the dining room, lido, and in extreme cases of ship movement, they will even have them at the front desk.
The infirmary on Holland America always have free dispenser of "Sea Calm" pills available for the taking at any time. Infirmary is located on lowest passenger deck, forward, entrance on the port side.
The shops on board usually have the wrist bands for sale.

Enchanted
March 13th, 2006, 12:09 PM
I bought the wristbands on my last trip and found they didn't help at all. I kept reading the instructions to make sure the pressure was in the right spot but still didn't find it helped. Gravol, however makes non-drowsy ginger chews, I found those helped. I find the regular gravol works the best but it knocks me out... and who wants to spend their cruise sleeping?

Clutier
March 14th, 2006, 09:44 AM
We were on a long cruise on the ROTTERDAM..my husband got very ill the first night. THey brought him a green apple..and medicine. HE thought he could never eat the green apple but they assured him that is what they do..those that work on the cruiseline..green apples sliced are the way to go!!!! He never got ill again and we were on the ship 24 days

antlou
March 14th, 2006, 10:41 AM
If you are a Costco member, I bought 100 for under $4.

Every cruise we have been on (we have been on 36) you can go to the Pursers desk and they will give you seasick pills-- FREE.

infopaul
March 14th, 2006, 05:05 PM
For those of you that like Granny Smith "green apples" as a remedy for your seasickness, I have good news. In my inquiry about availability of the green apples on their ships with HAL (not all ships have them), we received a message today on this issue. In it they had guaranteed that from here on all ships will now have the apples available to you.

Kudos to those of you for responding to this thread, it appears this may have given them the additional information needed to make this policy happen or who knows may be they just got a good deal from a supplier. Isn't it good to know that it didn't fall on deaf ears...Paul:)

sail7seas
March 14th, 2006, 05:32 PM
I have never yet in over 40+ HAL cruises failed to see green apples available on the ships. They have always been in our fruit basket in our cabin, in bowls in Lido and available from Room Service. I am happy to hear they will continue to be available on HAL ships. For eons, many people have claimed they helped with seasickness.......and they're 'just plain tasty' even if not being eaten to avoid mal de mer.

Oceanwench
March 14th, 2006, 05:33 PM
The sea bands absolutely do work for many people.

Our closest friends love to cruise. She always got seasick. He is an Internist M.D. He tried every prescription you can name for her and she always had some seasickness on every cruise.

When sea bands first became available, she and I were on the phone talking about them. He heard us and laughed. I asked 'her' to put him on the phone. I asked......"So, can they hurt her in any way?" He....No, of course, not. So, have you tried everything in your bag of tricks trying to help her? He.....Yes, of course. So......what is there to lose by her trying them. $10??

He......Okay, get her some.

I did. She used them. She was fine. He......it was in her head!!

Me: In her head? Then why didn't everything you prescribed for her do any good. If it was 'placebo effect', why didn't anything else she tried have a 'placebo effect'? He.....okay, so I guess they do work for some people. She has never had another episode of seasickness.

BUT they must be used/placed exactly as directed. I see some people with a band on one wrist only. That will not work. You must wear them on both wrists and they must be placed on the wrist where directed. If you wear them halfway up your arm, they will not work. They work on accupressure and the pressure point must be placed where it will be effective.



Thanks for posting this!
Now I have a good answer for when people tell me it's in my head! :D
Believe me, the first time I used them I thought, "These will never work."
I was so surprised when they did.

I put them on a few hours before we set sail, and I don't have the least bit of seasickness. I take them off the next day, and I only use them again if we have really rough weather.

I agree, it is very important to follow directions and get the button right over the right spot.

infopaul
March 14th, 2006, 10:12 PM
s7s, To tell the you the truth, I was a little suprised with the email. Normally we talk, but I believe they wanted me to have a source of documentation. I think they really went above and beyond...I just hope the supply is adequate.

My wife is health consciencious and she's delighted not having to bring her own supply (I think she will anyway). At least it offers another alternative for those that are prone to suffer with motion sickness. I wasn't quite sure it really worked, but it apparently does. I wonder if ginger tea works?...Paul:)