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View Full Version : How Do They Keep Fresh Vegs and Fruit on Long Cruises?


Evilmille
May 21st, 2008, 09:38 AM
On a 7 day cruise to Bermuda. Does the fruit and vegetables become scarce toward end of cruise? May be a stupid question but this is my first cruise.

CruisnGram
May 21st, 2008, 09:45 AM
No, it does not become scarce. Most fruits & veggies will easily keep for 6 or 7 days if kept at the right temperature. On longer cruises, I'm sure they replenish when in port.

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 09:48 AM
No, it does not become scarce. Most fruits & veggies will easily keep for 6 or 7 days if kept at the right temperature. On longer cruises, I'm sure they replenish when in port.

i'll be the brat....

OH YEAH? how about those transatlantic cruises? huh huh huh, smartypants.....hehehehheeh?

I'M STARVING! WHEN IS LUNCH COMING?

CruisnGram
May 21st, 2008, 09:49 AM
i'll be the brat....

OH YEAH? how about those transatlantic cruises? huh huh huh, smartypants.....hehehehheeh?

I'M STARVING! WHEN IS LUNCH COMING?

heh heh...why am I not surprised? :D

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 09:51 AM
heh heh...why am I not surprised? :D

still didn't answer my question.....*slapping knee*.

easygoesit
May 21st, 2008, 10:36 AM
still didn't answer my question.....*slapping knee*.


They drop a load in by helicopter lol.

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 10:44 AM
the OP had a legitimate inquiry. heck...maybe i'll ask about the longer cruises when they have the "tour of the ship" presentation when i cruise next month. or i'll just ask the crew in the dining room.

this is another one of those "how do they do it" thing when all we worry about is "do we dine in the main dining room or specialty".

it truly is amazing how they stock a ship. instead of helicopter...maybe a cargo plane? that explains the loud banging noises so early in the morning. crew members trying to catch the provisions.
http://www.terradaily.com/images/kenya-africa-flood-2006-disaster-management-bg.jpg

resurgam
May 21st, 2008, 11:07 AM
it truly is amazing how they stock a ship. instead of helicopter...maybe a cargo plane? that explains the loud banging noises so early in the morning. crew members trying to catch the provisions.


No it is a Hotdog sub. Come on the shape of the hotdog is perfect for the firing tubes and that banging you hear early in the morning is as they bounce off the side of the ship :D
I think what is really frightening is I can walk and talk at the same time !!!lol

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 11:09 AM
No it is a Hotdog sub. Come on the shape of the hotdog is perfect for the firing tubes and that banging you hear early in the morning is as they bounce off the side of the ship :D
I think what is really frightening is I can walk and talk at the same time !!!lol

OF COURSE! not to be confused with a "hot dog submarine SANDWICH" imagine that?!?!?!?!?!?

no but seriously...anyone know about the longer cruises? maybe and inert gas chamber?

Evilmille
May 21st, 2008, 11:27 AM
I was wondering if they restock when they reach a port like Bermuda.

I think I had a valid question and am waiting for the powers that be to delete this thread like they do all my others

lambs2
May 21st, 2008, 11:28 AM
Maybe they just use a whole lot of those Debbie Myer Green Bags for keeping produce fresh that I keep seeing advertised on TV???

resurgam
May 21st, 2008, 11:45 AM
most probably they have chill rooms or freezer rooms to get produce fresh, on the TA trips and as someone else said just get fresh products from the ports they visit. Like on my up and coming trip around the med. Which leads me to a side questions sorry OT but do the meals on the ship reflect the ports you are about to visit or have visited?

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 11:45 AM
Maybe they just use a whole lot of those Debbie Myer Green Bags for keeping produce fresh that I keep seeing advertised on TV???

you know what? poking fun or serious....THAT IS ONE HECK OF A PRODUCT!

Evilmille...yeah they definitely will stock what they need for most of the trip. and i guess it depends on the ports also. i would imagine it's like bargain shopping. would it be cheaper to buy in bulk in NYC or in Bermuda? or both? let's hope this thread doesn't get deleted.

i really think this is one of those threads that can offer insight as well as creative comic relief (to an otherwise stressful day).

BeckyThane
May 21st, 2008, 11:57 AM
On a 5-day Carnival cruise to Canada out of NYC last September we ran out of bananas on day #3. A major passenger uprising was in the works. :p Seriously. At the galley tour the Food & Beverage Director was asked why they couldn't have simply picked up some more in Canada? He said that regulations (USDA, I think?) stated that they could only provision in the U.S.

This still begs the question of how they provision on (and for) longer cruises, and those those don't both begin and end in the U.S.?

CruisinMatt
May 21st, 2008, 12:26 PM
I've been on cruises with 10 days as sea and we had salad up to the very end and it wasn't rotten. Those chefs work magic!! :D

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 12:41 PM
I've been on cruises with 10 days as sea and we had salad up to the very end and it wasn't rotten. Those chefs work magic!! :D

see? our point exactly. you had only salad! yes...i'm a brat.

insidecabin
May 21st, 2008, 01:06 PM
NCL pearl 10 day TA no stops, no problem except they ran out of some beers.

maryln
May 21st, 2008, 01:10 PM
I picked up a "Jewel Fact Sheet" when we were on the Jewel in Jan. Listed on the Executive Chef & Inventory Accountant's "shopping list" for the ship is 30,000 lbs. of fresh fruit. I saw many pallets of food on the dock in Miami. It also says "We are pleased to announce that the M/S Norwegian Jewel has scored a perfect 100% on previous USPH inspections!!".

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 01:13 PM
NCL pearl 10 day TA no stops, no problem except they ran out of some beers.

this is more of a problem for me than food.

bartender: sorry, sir, we ran out of corona
me: ok i'll have a bass ale
bartender: we ran out of that also
me: fine i'll take a heineken
bartender: again...
me: a double of irish whiskey then
bartender: very good choice, sir.

flashdog_1
May 21st, 2008, 03:45 PM
Even our Fridgidares and Kenmores will keep vegetables for a week. And yes, those neat products like the green bag or tupperware lettuce keepers do keep vegetables fresher longer.

Think about the vegetables that have the shortest shelf life. Cucumbers. You don't see much of them on menus on ships. And you don't see raw mushrooms on menus, either. They have a relatively short shelf life.

And it's also possible they buy at various ripeness stages.

It's the transatlantics with no stops for 11 days where they might run short. Even most transatlantics stop in the Azores or Canaries but there are some that go straight from a US port to a European one (not as much fun maybe, but they do exist).

It's a good question. When someone takes the kitchen tour, be sure to post what they tell you.

want2cruiseagain
May 21st, 2008, 03:57 PM
[quote=flashdog_1;14735936]
And it's also possible they buy at various ripeness stages.

[quote]


That would be my guess.

Sally Forth
May 21st, 2008, 04:15 PM
If you've ever worked in a grocery store or know someone who does long distance trucking, you quickly find out that "farm to table" can be up to a month for some fruits and vegetables. It's not that much of a challenge to keep stuff fresh for a week or so at sea in a temperature controlled storage area.

Viv

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 04:18 PM
If you've ever worked in a grocery store or know someone who does long distance trucking, you quickly find out that "farm to table" can be up to a month for some fruits and vegetables. It's not that much of a challenge to keep stuff fresh for a week or so at sea in a temperature controlled storage area.

Viv

ahhhhhhh...i like that. very nice! totally forgot they have to be transported. it's not like they just pull them out from the back and onto the shelves.

insidecabin
May 21st, 2008, 04:21 PM
at home you probably have a single fridge with compartments.

The ships have cold stores that are at different temps and humidities to optimise the shelf life of product.

On a lot of ships a lot of stuff is frozen anyway, most meat and fish for example.

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 04:29 PM
at home you probably have a single fridge with compartments.

oh you mean those drawers that i shove everything else BUT produce into them? hehehehehhehe

IT'S ALMOST QUITTIN TIME!

raudacruise
May 21st, 2008, 04:54 PM
To answer some questions:

1. The ships stores has special compartments for veggies that have a low oxygen content vs. high nitrogen. Oxygen is what rots veggies. The same technique is used for truck farmed fruits/veggies in the US.

2. At least on RCL/Celebrity they own a cargo ship that hauls the food from the US to Europe. They may get some minor amount of local food but they have long term contracts with food suppliers (like Sysco) in the US so its cheaper for them to lock in prices and not have to worry about things in Europe.

With the dollar dropping against the Euro as it has it's a good thing they locked in the prices. Other wise we'd probably have a "food surcharge" tacked onto our bill.

Philob
May 21st, 2008, 05:06 PM
On my Pride of Aloha cruise last year, the buffet had fresh-cut-in-front-of-you pineapple, mangos, and papayas with "Product of Phillipines" stickers on them :cool:

insidecabin
May 21st, 2008, 05:49 PM
To answer some questions:

1. The ships stores has special compartments for veggies that have a low oxygen content vs. high nitrogen. Oxygen is what rots veggies. The same technique is used for truck farmed fruits/veggies in the US.

2. At least on RCL/Celebrity they own a cargo ship that hauls the food from the US to Europe. They may get some minor amount of local food but they have long term contracts with food suppliers (like Sysco) in the US so its cheaper for them to lock in prices and not have to worry about things in Europe.

With the dollar dropping against the Euro as it has it's a good thing they locked in the prices. Other wise we'd probably have a "food surcharge" tacked onto our bill.


I think that is primeraly the frozen foods(meat/fish), seen plenty of european supplies going onto the ships over the last few trips in europe.

cubfan60004
May 21st, 2008, 05:58 PM
I heard that they have like a million of those "as seen on tv" keep fresh baggies. LOL Im cracking myself up

mbisson
May 21st, 2008, 06:02 PM
On a 7 day cruise to Bermuda. Does the fruit and vegetables become scarce toward end of cruise? May be a stupid question but this is my first cruise.

How Do They Keep Fresh Vegs and Fruit on Long Cruises?
They use transporters!!!

kat89447
May 21st, 2008, 06:08 PM
I used to work in resturants and a friend of mine worked on ships. Storage is the same on both. They have rooms held at different temps and separate accordingly. Some are humidity/temp controlled dry rooms, then there are refriged rooms that hold food at different temps, and then huge meat locker type freezers. It is possible to buy certain produce at different levels of ripeness, and some ships will take on local produce if allowed. Still it is possible to run out of anything. If a certain type of fruit or salad is "all the rage" that week it happens. We have had it happen that something we made as a special became very popular and ran out of it quickly and couldn't replenish by the next day or two. On some boats the food storage area can be half of a deck, and the other half is wine etc. Hope this helps.

jaja
May 21st, 2008, 06:12 PM
I heard that they have like a million of those "as seen on tv" keep fresh baggies. LOL Im cracking myself up

I use them and they work...esp for bananas!!!

resurgam
May 21st, 2008, 06:15 PM
On some boats the food storage area can be half of a deck, and the other half is wine etc. Hope this helps.
http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:xmA_wXm2pQ8kGM:http://static.twoday.net/anima/images/homer_simpson.jpg (http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://static.twoday.net/anima/images/homer_simpson.jpg&imgrefurl=http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm%3Ffuseaction%3Duser.viewprofile%26friend ID%3D112691089&h=303&w=300&sz=14&hl=en&start=30&tbnid=xmA_wXm2pQ8kGM:&tbnh=116&tbnw=115&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dhomer%2Bsimpson%26start%3D20%26gbv%3D 2%26ndsp%3D20%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN)Half a deck of WINE!!!!!

bethaniesmom
May 21st, 2008, 07:17 PM
i asked for banana with breakfast one trip on like day six of a seven day cruise and was told that they didn't have any bananas...that sometimes they get thru a week with a few on the last day but other times they don't last, that they just get too ripe, too fast. otherwise I have not seen them run out of anything.

Beverly

zebster15
May 21st, 2008, 07:54 PM
On a 7 day cruise to Bermuda. Does the fruit and vegetables become scarce toward end of cruise? May be a stupid question but this is my first cruise.

No question is a stupid question?

If you are going on the Dawn 6/1/08 join our Meet and Greet
http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=721821

meaclasact2
May 21st, 2008, 08:03 PM
On a 7 day cruise to Bermuda. Does the fruit and vegetables become scarce toward end of cruise? May be a stupid question but this is my first cruise.

We had tons of fresh fruits and vegetables during our voyage last Fall. Regarding the fruits...I did notice that we also had some wonderful dried fruit - the dried pineapple became a favorite for DH and I for breakfast. I would swear that they dried their own fruit - which would make a lot of sense considering that some fruit might start to get over ripened. I can't prove it, and whether or not it's true doesn't really matter - I only know that the fresh fruit and the dried fruit were all wonderful...from the first day to the 15th.

Don't worry - they'll be more than enough and it will all be delicious.

Heat Wave
May 21st, 2008, 08:03 PM
Like a PP said, I have had the ship run out of bananas before.

CruisnGram
May 21st, 2008, 08:12 PM
Like a PP said, I have had the ship run out of bananas before.

Well that would make sense as I can't think of any veggie or fruit that has a shorter shelf life then a banana. They seem to turn brown and squishy between the grocery store and home! :eek:

lambs2
May 21st, 2008, 08:23 PM
We had tons of fresh fruits and vegetables during our voyage last Fall. Regarding the fruits...I did notice that we also had some wonderful dried fruit - the dried pineapple became a favorite for DH and I for breakfast. I would swear that they dried their own fruit - which would make a lot of sense considering that some fruit might start to get over ripened. I can't prove it, and whether or not it's true doesn't really matter - I only know that the fresh fruit and the dried fruit were all wonderful...from the first day to the 15th.

Don't worry - they'll be more than enough and it will all be delicious.


The dried fruits on our recent March cruise on the Jewell were marvelous too. I LOVED the dried dates, apricots and golden raisins!

ZoneHPH
May 21st, 2008, 09:44 PM
ATTENTION: i have just unveiled the method by which all food on the ships last as long as they do... *drumroll*

in addition to turning the ship over for the next batch of pax...crew members engage in this method of food preservation:
https://www.superclearance.com/shop/image.php?productid=45037

that's why they want you to eat in the buffet once you board. crew members are each issued a food saver. and for the dried fruits:
http://www.getoffthegrid.com/images/dehydratorwork.jpg

how's that for crack-investigative work?

RaeVynn
May 21st, 2008, 10:08 PM
We get our green bags from our local food co-op... and they really do work!

I had salad greens keep for 10 days, once... still crisp as can be! And the bananas stay pretty darned perfect (DH likes his a tiny bit green) for the week.

Really good things. Check around before you buy, though... you might find them locally! :)

I sure hope we don't run out of bananas on our cruise!! :eek:

flashdog_1
May 22nd, 2008, 01:34 PM
I was glad to read above that the contracts with US suppliers keep them in US produce for the most part. Why?

All countries do not have the same sanitation standards that we do (nor method of growing them), and one ripe berry from say Costa Rica, could give your digestive system problems the rest of your life. (Not pointing a finger at CR that was just an example of a port of call that was not US). Happened to one of my friends who bought raspberries in her super market. I wait until the US produce is available instead of buying ahead of season from foreign countries.

A better example for a country should have been a 3rd world country outside our hemisphere, say Asia. You know, honey buckets supplying the fertilizer?

ZoneHPH
May 22nd, 2008, 01:38 PM
I was glad to read above that the contracts with US suppliers keep them in US produce for the most part. Why?

All countries do not have the same sanitation standards that we do (nor method of growing them), and one ripe berry from say Costa Rica, could give your digestive system problems the rest of your life. (Not pointing a finger at CR that was just an example of a port of call that was not US). Happened to one of my friends who bought raspberries in her super market. I wait until the US produce is available instead of buying ahead of season from foreign countries.

A better example for a country should have been a 3rd world country outside our hemisphere, say Asia. You know, honey buckets supplying the fertilizer?

hold on...don't we import a lot of our produce? ESPECIALLY things like bananas?

raudacruise
May 22nd, 2008, 03:06 PM
hold on...don't we import a lot of our produce? ESPECIALLY things like bananas?
Yes but mostly through US companies that have FDA/USDA inspections Example for bananas would be Dole (they have FDA certification for their organic brand).

ZoneHPH
May 22nd, 2008, 03:42 PM
Yes but mostly through US companies that have FDA/USDA inspections Example for bananas would be Dole (they have FDA certification for their organic brand).

ok true.

GORDONCHICK
May 22nd, 2008, 04:23 PM
Well that would make sense as I can't think of any veggie or fruit that has a shorter shelf life then a banana. They seem to turn brown and squishy between the grocery store and home! :eek:

They don't do what my mother does with over ripe bananas? Make banana bread?? Just kidding, but that was the whole reason we would let some bananas get too ripe when we lived at home!

Lisa1
May 22nd, 2008, 06:32 PM
They don't do what my mother does with over ripe bananas? Make banana bread?? Just kidding, but that was the whole reason we would let some bananas get too ripe when we lived at home!

Oh, they do make banana bread! I remember going through the Blue Lagoon on the Star almost every day to pick up a piece (or two or three, but it's a cruise - who's counting?). That was a few years ago, but I hope they bake it on the Pearl this year too!

VoyageVirgin
May 22nd, 2008, 06:38 PM
hold on...don't we import a lot of our produce? ESPECIALLY things like bananas?

YES, We have no bananas

Cosmopolitan
May 23rd, 2008, 01:01 AM
Oh, they do make banana bread! I remember going through the Blue Lagoon on the Star almost every day to pick up a piece (or two or three, but it's a cruise - who's counting?). That was a few years ago, but I hope they bake it on the Pearl this year too!

They still had it this past January, even at the NY port as you were waiting to board:)

ktpc2005
May 23rd, 2008, 08:48 AM
most probably they have chill rooms or freezer rooms to get produce fresh, on the TA trips and as someone else said just get fresh products from the ports they visit. Like on my up and coming trip around the med. Which leads me to a side questions sorry OT but do the meals on the ship reflect the ports you are about to visit or have visited?

On our Med Sea cruise on the Gem, the meals did not reflect the ports that you visited unless you have the Italian food in LaCucina after visting an Italian port:rolleyes:

Mrs_Duffy
May 24th, 2008, 11:43 AM
I choose not to think about it...as long as the food tastes good, I'm not going to worry myself!

But you can think of it this way, when you buy food at the grocery store, do you know how long it's been there? Odds are it has spent longer than a day at the store, more than a day at the warehouse, more than a day in travel...so if ships get their produce fresh from the docks, they might be getting it days to a week earlier than when you would if you bought it at a supermarket. I know that when I buy produce from a wholesaler it lasts much, much longer than when I buy it at the store.

I too was on a cruise where they ran out of bananas...I was astounded at the number of people who were upset over this! I never realized how essential bananas were to some people's days! I just switched to grapefruit!