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mafig
May 29th, 2009, 09:20 AM
DH is thinking of bringing a little radio with us.

He want to know if anyone knows:

what frequency the cruise ship uses to communicate with port, the pilot boat, and other ships?

Anyone know?

kelz66
May 29th, 2009, 09:23 AM
DH is thinking of bringing a little radio with us.

He want to know if anyone knows:

what frequency the cruise ship uses to communicate with port, the pilot boat, and other ships?

Anyone know?

It probably differs from port to port.

:cool:

Wennfred
May 29th, 2009, 09:50 AM
website acting up

Wennfred
May 29th, 2009, 09:51 AM
website acting up

Wennfred
May 29th, 2009, 09:53 AM
Some type of VHF Marine radio, you will need a VHF scanner to listen in on the comms.

Go here and check out the VHF Channels that are used:

http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/marcomms/vhf.htm

Fred

BigDogCruiser
May 29th, 2009, 09:56 AM
In order to monitor ships’ communications you would need a marine VHF radio or a scanner that operates in the 156.050 MHz to 162.025 MHz range. Since cruise ships travel between U.S. ports and international ports they are required to broadcast radio communications following the regulations of the International Maritime Organization and the International Telecommunications Union. The International Maritime Organization regulates the outfitting and operation of most vessels engaged on international voyages, except warships. Most IMO radio regulations affect all passenger ships and other ships of 300 gross tonnage and upward. IMO rules affecting radio are promulgated in the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention which has been ratified in the U.S. The International Telecommunications Union regulates all use of radio spectrum by any person or vessel outside U.S. waters. ITU rules affecting radio, which have treaty status in the U.S. and most other nations, are published in the ITU Radio Regulations. The ITU has established three VHF marine radio channels recognized worldwide for safety purposes:[/FONT]

Channel 16 (156.800 MHz) - Distress, safety and calling
Channel 13 (156.650 MHz) - Intership navigation (bridge-to-bridge)
Channel 70 (156.525 MHz) - Digital Selective Calling

Within U.S. territorial waters the following marine VHF radio channels have been established for distinct purposes.

HAILING & EMERGENCY: Channel 16 - Use channel 16 when making initial contact with other stations, to make distress calls or conduct emergency communications with the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard uses channel 9 as a hailing frequency in the northeast United States.

VESSEL TO VESSEL NAVIGATIONAL SAFETY: Channel 13 - Conversations on this channel are limited to safety communications between vessels. Some also call it the bridge-to-bridge channel. This is where you communicate your intentions to another boat. This could be something like telling the other boat that you will pass them port to port or plan to overtake them from their starboard side. Vessels over 20 meters in length operating in the U.S. Territorial Waters are required to monitor both channels 13 and 16.

INTERSHIP SAFETY: Channel 06 - This channel is used for intership or ship to ship emergency communications. The Coast Guard also uses the channel for search and rescue missions, and emergency operations. This can include communications with aircraft like helicopters or C-130s to boats.

COAST GUARD: Channel 22A - 22A is the channel assigned as a working channels for boaters and the Coast Guard. Once you make contact with the Coast Guard on 16, they will ask you to switch to 22A.

All other channels are used for general communications.

Hope this helps :).

mafig
May 29th, 2009, 09:59 AM
I'll let him know, thanks!:)

ncc7501
May 29th, 2009, 10:14 AM
Be careful.

If you read the fine print in your Carnival ticket, Carnival specifically prohibits possession of ham radios by passengers while they are on the cruise. This is because they can transmit.

Now, some scanners and VHF receivers look alot like ham radios so if your bag is checked by security they may have some questions to ask.

On my cruise last summer I noticed the usual VHF and sat-com antennas. there were also a couple of HF (shortwave band) antennas for HF marine frequencies. Im not sure how much ships use HF anymore, probably only occasionally.

Im bringing a battery powered AM/FM/shortwave radio with me this summer. I think it will beinteresting to listen to local radio stations while in port and to see what broadcasts I can receive while at sea.


73 and good DX.

Wennfred
May 29th, 2009, 10:17 AM
N6QJJ



Fred

twotogo
June 3rd, 2009, 01:22 PM
Sure could use some help from you that know about scanners since I know nothing.

I would like to get one for my husband to use on cruises to listen to communications. From reading the above posts you need a VHF marine scanner with a certain range.

Bearcat is the ones I found but don't know if they are what I should get or if there others that would be better. From reading about the BCD396XT I don't know if it has what he would need.

I could really use some help.

Thanks, Susan

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 01:29 PM
Sure could use some help from you that know about scanners since I know nothing.

I would like to get one for my husband to use on cruises to listen to communications. From reading the above posts you need a VHF marine scanner with a certain range.

Bearcat is the ones I found but don't know if they are what I should get or if there others that would be better. From reading about the BCD396XT I don't know if it has what he would need.

I could really use some help.

Thanks, Susan


Here you go, this one is nice and compac and falls within the VHF freqs:

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3070525&y=12&x=7&retainProdsInSession=1

Hear stuff as it happens in your area.

This Uniden BC95XLTB scanner is fully PC programmable (software not included) and includes the most interesting "action" bands where you can hear police, ambulance, fire, amateur radio, public utilities, weather and more. Frequencies include 25-54/108-174/406-512/806-956MHz (excluding cellular). This very cool handheld scanner is great for NASCAR!

Only 129.00 at Radio Shack

http://rsk.imageg.net/graphics/product_images/pRS1C-4639800w345.jpg




Fred

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 01:31 PM
You see above where it says (excluding cellular), all of these scanners can be modified to open all freqs including the Cellular freqs so you can hear people chatting on their Cell phones too. :D



Fred

twotogo
June 3rd, 2009, 01:32 PM
wennfred,

Thanks for the reply.

Just because, what do you think of the Bearcat I mentioned?

Susan

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 01:40 PM
wennfred,

Thanks for the reply.

Just because, what do you think of the Bearcat I mentioned?

Susan

Forget about it !!! That Bearcat one I checked on Ebay just to read the features and on Ebay they want over 500.00 for it. First of all, its too big, the Uniden is smaller and fits will in your pocket. 2nd, the Uniden one has a BNC connector so you can change the Antenna or add a Massive Base Station antenna on your rooftop and connect it to the Uniden with a cable. The Bearcat has a Fixed Antenna on it that if it falls and breaks your lost your radio and your 500.00 dollars.

I'm a Ham Radio Operator and would go with Uniden in a heart beat.



Fred

twotogo
June 3rd, 2009, 01:48 PM
Wennfred,

Thanks so much, I could have made a BIG mistake!

I totally forgot about one my husband got me one years ago but I don't have a clue how to use it. Maybe you could tell me if it would work. It is a Radio Shack PRO-39 hyperscan. I'm sure the new ones are a bit smaller than it is though.

Susan

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 01:52 PM
Wennfred,

Thanks so much, I could have made a BIG mistake!

I totally forgot about one my husband got me one years ago but I don't have a clue how to use it. Maybe you could tell me if it would work. It is a Radio Shack PRO-39 hyperscan. I'm sure the new ones are a bit smaller than it is though.

Susan

That radio you have is a nice one also and also hits the VHF freqs, its currently selling on ebay for 50.00. And your radio also has a BNC connector to change out the antenna.

http://cgi.ebay.com/RADIO-SHACK-PRO-39-200-CHANNEL-800-MHZ-LOOK_W0QQitemZ200347580249QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_De faultDomain_0?hash=item2ea5a57759&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72:1205|66:2|65:12|39:1|240:1318|301:1|2 93:1|294:50

PRO-39 (200-0303) Specifications Faxback Doc. # 8991

Frequency Coverage:

VHF-Lo...........................................30-50 MHz (in 5 kHz steps)

Ham..............................................5 0-54 MHz (in 5 kHz steps)

Aircraft..................................108-136.975 MHz (in 25 kHz steps)

Government.....................................137-144 MHz (in 5 kHz steps)

Ham............................................144-148 MHz (in 5 kHz steps)

VHF Hi.........................................148-174 MHz (in 5 KHz steps)

Ham/Government..............................380-450 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)

UHF-Lo......................................450-470 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)

UHF-TV......................................470-512 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)

UHF-Hi.................................806-823.9375 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)
851-868.9375 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)
896-960 MHz (in 12.5 kHz steps)

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 01:54 PM
Since you already have a Scanner, get him a Kindle-2 if he likes to read or a I-Touch so he can store tons of movies on it.


Fred

twotogo
June 3rd, 2009, 01:59 PM
The kindle may be the way to go.

Radio shack is out on line and the local store don't have them either. I think I remember hearing cell calls but not sure so how would you modify for cell calls (not that I really would want to listen to others on their phones).

Susan

twotogo
June 3rd, 2009, 02:01 PM
He bought me an itouch for Christmas and in passing mentioned him having one and he said he probably wouldn't use one too much. But I do appreciate all your suggestions.

Thanks.

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 02:02 PM
The kindle may be the way to go.

Radio shack is out on line and the local store don't have them either. I think I remember hearing cell calls but not sure so how would you modify for cell calls (not that I really would want to listen to others on their phones).

Susan

There is a new Kindle DX thats much bigger. You can Chip or Modify the Scanner by removing a Cap or Resistor, there are Hacks online somewhere on that depending on the actual radio.


Fred

twotogo
June 3rd, 2009, 02:16 PM
Is the Kindle 2 the same as the DX you mentioned? I am looking at switching to a Kindle as opposed to the scanner. I'll take mine for
him to play with.

travelntreats
June 3rd, 2009, 02:20 PM
N6QJJ



Fred
N67SK here:D

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 02:20 PM
Is the Kindle 2 the same as the DX you mentioned? I am looking at switching to a Kindle as opposed to the scanner. I'll take mine for
him to play with.

There is a Kindle, a Kindle 2 and the new Kindle DX which is much bigger. I got Wendy the Kindle 2 and then the next day the DX came out :rolleyes:

Go here and check them out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Kindle

Wennfred
June 3rd, 2009, 02:21 PM
N67SK here:D

Cool !!! :D

travelntreats
June 3rd, 2009, 02:24 PM
Cool !!! :D
wanna buy another ? Good price ! :eek:

queenofdnile
June 3rd, 2009, 02:24 PM
Thanks, DH and I are both HAMS and will bring scanners next cruise!

twotogo
June 3rd, 2009, 02:35 PM
Thanks everyone for your help.Now I have a lot to think about. Have to run, my husband came home early and he keeps popping in here and I can't change screens fast enough.

ecps92
September 2nd, 2009, 02:40 PM
99% of all Cellular in the USA is now digital, so even if the Scanner was modified it won't be able to decode the Cellular transmissions

You see above where it says (excluding cellular), all of these scanners can be modified to open all freqs including the Cellular freqs so you can hear people chatting on their Cell phones too. :D



Fred

ecps92
September 2nd, 2009, 02:43 PM
As mentioned by one Poster, the VHF Marine channels [can be too much to listen to IN Port, if busy] are used for ship-ship, Pilots, Air-Evac ! and Coast Guard communications.

If you are going to program the scanner for the VHF Marine channels, also look for a list of International VHF channels, not just the USA Channels.

Additionally, the Ships themselves employ a UHF Radio system [1, 2, some 4 Repeater channels with some using 16 channels] and Disney uses an 800 Trunked system.

Much of the information is available at my home page http://scanmaritime.com We always appreciate new Cruise Ship information

DH is thinking of bringing a little radio with us.

He want to know if anyone knows:

what frequency the cruise ship uses to communicate with port, the pilot boat, and other ships?

Anyone know?

Carolin
September 2nd, 2009, 03:39 PM
Do the ships communcate with the ports with their own languages? French, Dutch, etc.... I doubt that they all choose English to communcate by. Anyone know?

jetskier
September 2nd, 2009, 08:22 PM
Do the ships communcate with the ports with their own languages? French, Dutch, etc.... I doubt that they all choose English to communcate by. Anyone know?

All communication on the bridge is required to be done in English. I would imagine the same is required for off ship communication.

The same is true with airlines.
Dave

ecps92
September 4th, 2009, 11:48 AM
English is the Common travel [Aircraft / Ships] language, altho for some of the Crew [including Captains] it's broken english, you should be able to understand them on the VHF Marine channels.
If you listen to the UHF On-Board channels, well.... you milage will vary :)

Do the ships communcate with the ports with their own languages? French, Dutch, etc.... I doubt that they all choose English to communcate by. Anyone know?

Froufie
September 4th, 2009, 12:13 PM
Don't think any type of ham radio is allowed on the cruise - definitely in the contract and big signs when boarding and debarking in the different ports!!!

JohnnyCruiser
September 4th, 2009, 01:19 PM
Here you go, this one is nice and compac and falls within the VHF freqs:

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3070525&y=12&x=7&retainProdsInSession=1


As an added bonus, it does the aviation VHF frequencies from 118.000 to 135.950 so you can also listen in on the local airport.

ecps92
September 8th, 2009, 10:43 AM
Well, you do need permission in each of the foreign Countries.
Bermuda has a nice process [e-mail, Fax or walk-in]

Don't think any type of ham radio is allowed on the cruise - definitely in the contract and big signs when boarding and debarking in the different ports!!!