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mafig
May 29th, 2009, 09:46 AM
DH might want to bring a small radio with us.

He asked me to ask if anyone knows what frequency the cruise ship uses to communicate with ports, other cruise ships, pilot boats.

Anyone know:confused:

ab0si
May 29th, 2009, 10:34 AM
I think it is mostly VHF: 156-162 mhz or so:
http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/marcomms/vhf.htm U.S.
http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/marcomms/apps18.htm international

There are Medium and short wave frequencies assigned, also. They are probably listed on the above site.

Sorry I can't be specific as, in spite of being a ham, I don't listen to the public service frequencies at all.

caribsun
May 29th, 2009, 10:38 AM
http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/marcomms/vhf.htm

Aquahound
May 29th, 2009, 12:03 PM
The hailing frequency is ch 16, 156.8 mhz. From there, the pilots, harbor masters, etc, will direct the ship to another idol channel.

mafig
May 29th, 2009, 12:16 PM
good info.

thanks everyone!:)

crule
May 29th, 2009, 01:39 PM
You'll find the Ship-to-Port stuff on Marine VHF like the other users have spoken. (Just program in the entire slate of Marine VHF and scan them).

Tender-to-shore is also on VHF.

Tender-to-Cruise Ship and also comms on the ship itself are usually on UHF (460mhz range).

Do a google search for "Cruise Ship Frequencies" -there's a pretty good website that has a variety of them.

Also, depending on how saavy your husband is with radios, he may want to look at setting up an "AIS" receiver - couple that with maps and a GPS, and you can plot ships and see the info on neighboring ones.

ecps92
September 2nd, 2009, 02:44 PM
As mentioned by one Poster, the VHF Marine channels [can be too much to listen to IN Port, if busy] are used for ship-ship, Pilots, Air-Evac ! and Coast Guard communications.

If you are going to program the scanner for the VHF Marine channels, also look for a list of International VHF channels, not just the USA Channels.

Additionally, the Ships themselves employ a UHF Radio system [1, 2, some 4 Repeater channels with some using 16 channels] and Disney uses an 800 Trunked system.

Much of the information is available at my home page http://scanmaritime.com We always appreciate new Cruise Ship information



You'll find the Ship-to-Port stuff on Marine VHF like the other users have spoken. (Just program in the entire slate of Marine VHF and scan them).

Tender-to-shore is also on VHF.

Tender-to-Cruise Ship and also comms on the ship itself are usually on UHF (460mhz range).

Do a google search for "Cruise Ship Frequencies" -there's a pretty good website that has a variety of them.

Also, depending on how saavy your husband is with radios, he may want to look at setting up an "AIS" receiver - couple that with maps and a GPS, and you can plot ships and see the info on neighboring ones.

ehfl
September 2nd, 2009, 11:09 PM
They are on the VHF frequencies. Channel 16 is the hailing frequency. You might also listen in on Channel 9 and 13. If you use the scanner feature, you should be able to hear what's going on.

ecps92
September 4th, 2009, 11:46 AM
Depending on the Port Ch.20 could be in use for the Pilots [Boston]
161.6000 R / 157.0000 input


They are on the VHF frequencies. Channel 16 is the hailing frequency. You might also listen in on Channel 9 and 13. If you use the scanner feature, you should be able to hear what's going on.

chrise718
December 13th, 2012, 07:59 PM
Where can I buy a radio receiver to listen to this? What do they cost? Anyone have any links?

ecps92
December 13th, 2012, 08:04 PM
Radio Shack
Scanner World
Scannermaster.com
Ham Radio Outlet

Plenty of other places out there, all depends on where you live/work/travel

Where can I buy a radio receiver to listen to this? What do they cost? Anyone have any links?

mapsmith
December 13th, 2012, 11:26 PM
Enlightening thread. Just the other day I was wondering if the Ships had a channel to listen to like United Airlines does with their "Channel 9". Would be cool if the ship would make it available to passengers to listen to on the in room TVs.

ducklite
December 14th, 2012, 06:44 AM
Better yet, cruise on a ship with an "Open Bridge" policy and you'll hear everything live and in person. :D

uksimonusa
December 14th, 2012, 07:04 AM
Depending on the Port Ch.20 could be in use for the Pilots [Boston]
161.6000 R / 157.0000 input

Marine VHF Ch. 12 in Port Canaveral

klfrodo
December 14th, 2012, 10:07 AM
Interesting thread.
For security purposes, I would have thought that these communications would be encrypted.

Putterdude
December 14th, 2012, 10:19 AM
Various ports and traffic control areas use different frequencies for instance I monitor the ships going to Alaska and from Vancouver to the middle of Vancouver Is. there are 3 different marine traffic control areas all using a different channel. You really don't hear much all they do is check in with traffic, they tell traffic their routing and their ETA at a certain point and traffic tells them what traffic is in the area. As the ship leaves the respective traffic area it advises traffic control that they are leaving their area and switching over to the frequency of the other control area, traffic acknowledges that and usually wishes them a good day. As noted above all vessels monitor channel 16 which is the hailing channels however you seldom hear a cruise ship using it as they know what frequencies to use and go directly to them.

wscott52
December 14th, 2012, 10:58 AM
Interesting thread.
For security purposes, I would have thought that these communications would be encrypted.

The internal systems might be encrypted but the external communications are unencrypted for safety and compatibility. Channel 16 (VHF) is the international hailing and distress frequency. All ships at sea are required to monitor channel 16 at all times. The maximum range for VHF is about 30-40 miles even with the antenna high on a ship's mast. Generally the traffic on the VHF channels used on a ship is safety related anyway and security is less of a concern than being heard by as many people near by as possible.

wscott52
December 14th, 2012, 11:02 AM
Enlightening thread. Just the other day I was wondering if the Ships had a channel to listen to like United Airlines does with their "Channel 9". Would be cool if the ship would make it available to passengers to listen to on the in room TVs.

Most of what you would hear would be very boring. VHF is not used, or not supposed to be used, like CB radios for idle chatter. There are channels reserved for less critical communication boat to boat, like channels 68,69.

Capt_BJ
December 14th, 2012, 11:46 AM
the requirement for larger vessels to use AIS has significantly cut down the bridge to bridge chatter that happened on VHF-FM in the past. Most of the questions that were asked bridge to bridge about intentions, course speed etc are automatically sent by a ship and rec'd and displayed on all other ships in the area - all the same data you see on sites like MaritimeTraffic.com

Similarly commercial vessels no longer use HF radio to talk to the home office. That satellite based web access was not put in for pass' use! We get to use the excess bandwidth after the businesss end is done like processing your ATM withdrawls for the casino . . .

In the harbors you'll pickup a little chatter channel 13 is bridge to bridge, pilots usually on 12, 16 distress and general calling.

if you want to listen in on VHF-FM you can buy a handhelp at any decent boat supply or better sporting goods in boating areas for as little as $50. Even at best buy!

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Uniden+-+VHF+Marine+2-Way+Radio/2038098.p?id=1218306947685&skuId=2038098&ref=06&loc=01&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=2038098&extensionType=pla:g&s_kwcid=PTC!pla!!!22278234874!g!!6892553434&gclid=CNaXwtmrmrQCFQixnQodhD4AVA

but do NOT use it like a CB and call ships to chat . . .

ecps92
December 15th, 2012, 09:49 AM
Not at all, just like Aircraft Comms.

Plenty to listen to, altho there are now a few fleets running MotoTRBO which can not be decoded with just a scanner [for now] Lots to listen to as your ship communicates with Master of the Port, the Port Pilots, the Line Crews during docking and then the missing passenger checks before departing. :eek:

Click on the link below for a list of the Reported [always looking for recent reports and new info] on a majority of ships across the fleets.
If your ship is listed, but there are no frequencies, it just means that no one has shared the info as yet.

Interesting thread.
For security purposes, I would have thought that these communications would be encrypted.

6rugrats
December 15th, 2012, 10:41 AM
Have you tried asking Kenneth?

mapsmith
December 15th, 2012, 11:12 AM
Most of what you would hear would be very boring. VHF is not used, or not supposed to be used, like CB radios for idle chatter. There are channels reserved for less critical communication boat to boat, like channels 68,69.


Maybe it is boring, but it might be interesting as the harbor pilot brings the ship into the dock.

ecps92
December 15th, 2012, 11:16 AM
Boring is relative to ones interests. :D

Now to learn Italian, Spanish, German for when those liners do make Boston next year, for my listening enjoyment :cool:

Maybe it is boring, but it might be interesting as the harbor pilot brings the ship into the dock.

wscott52
December 20th, 2012, 07:12 PM
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Uniden+-+VHF+Marine+2-Way+Radio/2038098.p?id=1218306947685&skuId=2038098&ref=06&loc=01&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=2038098&extensionType=pla:g&s_kwcid=PTC!pla!!!22278234874!g!!6892553434&gclid=CNaXwtmrmrQCFQixnQodhD4AVA[/url]

but do NOT use it like a CB and call ships to chat . . .

A word of caution: If it transmits you will not be allowed to bring it on the ship. If they see it in your luggage they will confiscate it. Your best bet will be a small scanner that receives VHF channels and hope you can convince them it doesn't transmit. I have a small VHF transceiver I was going to take and contacted RCCL about it. Her responses was any kind of radio that transmits is STRICTLY forbidden. I just ordered a GRE America PSR-120 to take but I suspect even that will make them nervous. Can't really blame them I guess. VHF now no longer requires a license so anyone can walk into Walmart and buy one, charge it up, and go on the air.

ecps92
December 20th, 2012, 07:32 PM
Yet they let every little FRS/GMRS bubble pack radio on-board.

And those Frequencies are right in the same band as many of the on-board ship frequencies.... damn pencil pushers :eek:

A word of caution: If it transmits you will not be allowed to bring it on the ship. If they see it in your luggage they will confiscate it. Your best bet will be a small scanner that receives VHF channels and hope you can convince them it doesn't transmit. I have a small VHF transceiver I was going to take and contacted RCCL about it. Her responses was any kind of radio that transmits is STRICTLY forbidden. I just ordered a GRE America PSR-120 to take but I suspect even that will make them nervous. Can't really blame them I guess. VHF now no longer requires a license so anyone can walk into Walmart and buy one, charge it up, and go on the air.

wscott52
December 21st, 2012, 02:32 AM
Yet they let every little FRS/GMRS bubble pack radio on-board.

And those Frequencies are right in the same band as many of the on-board ship frequencies.... :eek:

Not really. FRS and GMRS bubble pack radios operate in the 462-467 mhz range and transmit with 2 watts or less.

VHF radios operate in the 156-157 mhz range and some readily available portables transmit at 6 watts. My Icom M24 transmits at 5 watts. And they can transmit on frequencies that are ACTUALLy used by the ship.

As far as safe operation of the ship is concerned the FRS/GMRS radios are not an issue.

ecps92
December 22nd, 2012, 10:56 AM
Yes, if you are talking about VHF Maine.

However, 95% of cruise ships also use UHF Radios for on-board activities. :cool:

457/467 Mhz. And Many of their US of A] frequency choices are FRS/GMRS Pairs [OK in Europe/Asia - but not the USA]

http://scanmaritime.com/
http://scanmaritime.com/frequencies.htm <<-- at the bottom of the page lists the various Frequencies allowed and the Regions allowed, altho enforcement in the US is rare

Not really. FRS and GMRS bubble pack radios operate in the 462-467 mhz range and transmit with 2 watts or less.

VHF radios operate in the 156-157 mhz range and some readily available portables transmit at 6 watts. My Icom M24 transmits at 5 watts. And they can transmit on frequencies that are ACTUALLy used by the ship.

As far as safe operation of the ship is concerned the FRS/GMRS radios are not an issue.

wscott52
December 23rd, 2012, 09:13 AM
Yes, if you are talking about VHF Maine.

However, 95% of cruise ships also use UHF Radios for on-board activities. :cool:



Well, ok, that's true. If it were me designing a UHF system for intra-ship communication I wouldn't use frequencies available to passengers with low cost transmitters but it looks like they do. Still, all external communications from the ship will be VHF or satellite or, maybe, HF SSB radio.

bob brown
December 23rd, 2012, 07:17 PM
I thought that intra-ship communications have replaced UHF handi-talkies with internal cell phones. And those I believe are encrypted......

wscott52
December 24th, 2012, 12:59 PM
I thought that intra-ship communications have replaced UHF handi-talkies with internal cell phones. And those I believe are encrypted......

Good point and I don't know the answer. Watching the Port Everglades webcam when they are zoomed in on a departing ship it sometimes looks like the officers coordinating the docking/undocking are using UHF portables. I will look for them in Feb.

bob brown
December 25th, 2012, 01:57 AM
Good point and I don't know the answer. Watching the Port Everglades webcam when they are zoomed in on a departing ship it sometimes looks like the officers coordinating the docking/undocking are using UHF portables. I will look for them in Feb.

I was referring mainly to the hotel department on board.....perhaps the deck department still uses UHF or VHF radio's for operation purposes.