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Hei1980
June 5th, 2009, 09:10 AM
DH has fought me when he needed a cane, then another fight concerning a walker; now it is the scooter. What to do? It turned out I was right about the cane and about the walker. Know his life would be easier with the scooter. It takes all of his strength to walk a short distance. I am not strong enough to push him in a wheelchair for any amount of time.

Sorry, guys, but men are very vain and I think he feels to have a scooter small enough to be of service on a cruise ship he would look foolish being 225 lbs and 6 ft tall. Too big for something that small. He also worries about going to the dining room, what to do with the scooter and how does he get to the table without his walker? My answer is this; I am 5’2” tall and he could use me and a cane.
Now, do I just go ahead and order the scooter?

uppitycats
June 5th, 2009, 09:22 AM
DH has fought me when he needed a cane, then another fight concerning a walker; now it is the scooter. What to do? It turned out I was right about the cane and about the walker. Know his life would be easier with the scooter. It takes all of his strength to walk a short distance. I am not strong enough to push him in a wheelchair for any amount of time.

Sorry, guys, but men are very vain and I think he feels to have a scooter small enough to be of service on a cruise ship he would look foolish being 225 lbs and 6 ft tall. Too big for something that small. He also worries about going to the dining room, what to do with the scooter and how does he get to the table without his walker? My answer is this; I am 5’2” tall and he could use me and a cane.
Now, do I just go ahead and order the scooter?

Here are thoughts on a couple of issues:

If your husband is going to use a scooter, you need a handicap-accessible cabin. Most scooters will not fit through the door of a regular cabin (regardless of what the cruise line or scooter manufacturers might tell you!), and even if you did somehow manage to get the scooter through the door, then you and your husband would be tripping over it or having to climb over it whenever it was in the cabin.

All regular-sized scooters and power wheelchairs can work quite well on a cruise ship. I rent a power wheelchair when I cruise, and did not have a problem getting anywhere on the ship.

As for the dining thing -- you arrange to have a table near the door, or where there's a direct path from the door to the table. You "drive" up to the table, transfer into a dining chair, and one of the staff will take your scooter and "park" it out of the way. Then when you're ready to leave, you ask them to get it for you. This is not a big deal; they do it for anyone who requests it, and seem to enjoy "playing" with the scooter as they move it to the side, somewhere.

If you're in a power chair, you simple move up to the table, and they'll remove one of the regular chairs. This is also not a big deal.

I'm a large person too -- the power chair worked very well for me on my last cruise.

vivrich
June 5th, 2009, 10:25 AM
Try looking for a Scootie, (and look around, not just one place, their are about four or five different sites that sell the same thing, even E-Bay) it's a bit smaller than your average size scooter, the four wheel types and they break apart in three pieces for easy handling. They're light weight as well total about 120/125 lbs, apart the heaviest piece is 75 lbs The cost is pretty reasonable as well, they make them with three or four wheels, the front wheels (with the four wheel model is a bit more stable).
As for the vain thing, it comes with stubborness.

xxoocruiser
June 5th, 2009, 10:40 AM
DH has fought me when he needed a cane, then another fight concerning a walker; now it is the scooter. What to do? It turned out I was right about the cane and about the walker. Know his life would be easier with the scooter. It takes all of his strength to walk a short distance. I am not strong enough to push him in a wheelchair for any amount of time.

Sorry, guys, but men are very vain and I think he feels to have a scooter small enough to be of service on a cruise ship he would look foolish being 225 lbs and 6 ft tall. Too big for something that small. He also worries about going to the dining room, what to do with the scooter and how does he get to the table without his walker? My answer is this; I am 5’2” tall and he could use me and a cane.
Now, do I just go ahead and order the scooter?

Doesn't make a difference if male or female when it comes to Pride. it's hard to accept that one might need to use mobility equipment at all and than have to progress to a scooter. It's hard to accept that but we all get over it when we realize it changes are life for the better.

You might try this approach. Would suggest stressing to DH that it's not about whether or not he needs a scooter for long term use. Instead it's all about energy managment, expanding ones independance and both of you enjoying the vacation. It also needs to be stressed to DH that he places you at great risk when he expects you to support him while he uses only a cane. What happens if you were to fall and hurt yourself in the process ? You'd be of no use to him. The scooter will help him to realize that independence is greater that trying to save pride.

I suggested this approach to a friend of mine and than she just rented the scooter. It's has changed her husband's whole thinking about a scooter. In fact since he now will use a scooter when traveling, they take more cruises. She comes back having felt as though she had a vacation with her husband rather than feeling like an overworked/underappreciated caregiver.

To answer your other questions
No he will will not look foolish using a scooter. There will be many others on the ship. The rental company will take height /weight into consideration so he gets the appropriate scooter. Also ask the to properly adjust the seat height before delivering it to the cabin. There will be many others on the ship.

For dining : he'll drive the scooter right up to the dining table. Transfer into a chair and the waiter will store with scooter and return it after dinner.

Hei1980
June 5th, 2009, 11:08 AM
For years, I had no idea DH was using me as his cane; he was great at hiding his problem. I was exhausted most of the time, then he began to fall taking me with him. Not a pretty sight, two old people on the floor. Finally, I got wise and DH got a cane. To this day I walk at least five feet ahead of him, having 225 lbs take you out is not fun. Now, we tell everyone that I walk in front of him because he fears land mines. LOL

On our last cruise I won enough money to buy a scooter; it will be my gift to him. “One cannot look a gift horse in the mouth.” Thank you for your help in this very important matter to us. BTW, we have Cat 11 for the next three cruises planned. That should help parking a scooter in the cabin, not good but not bad?

Starr Mtn
June 5th, 2009, 11:20 AM
I've used both a scooter (full size) and a power wheelchair
on many cruises. It certainly was a better choice
than when I used crutches and thus was limited in time I could
be out and about as well as distance I could walk.
And with the crutches I was often worried about falling.

I suggest you rent a scooter for your next cruise. It will
be delivered to your cabin for your use on the ship and
at ports. Then you leave it in your cabin when you depart.

The rental company will determine the size needed. Check
with your cruise line - some require rentals for specific companies.

You will need a handicap accessible cabin to accommodate
the scooter.

As stated above - it is very easy to use the scooter in the dining
room.

You might want to have your husband try out scooters at a medical
supply store. They can also assess the type and size he needs.

Or you could try one in places like grocery stores or some stores.
However, they are large, bulky pieces of equipment. But it will give
him a little practice on how they operate before cruising.

Also, the cruise line personnel will assist you at embarkation and push
him in a wheelchair to your cabin.

uppitycats
June 5th, 2009, 11:28 AM
Try looking for a Scootie, (and look around, not just one place, their are about four or five different sites that sell the same thing, even E-Bay) it's a bit smaller than your average size scooter, the four wheel types and they break apart in three pieces for easy handling. They're light weight as well total about 120/125 lbs, apart the heaviest piece is 75 lbs The cost is pretty reasonable as well, they make them with three or four wheels, the front wheels (with the four wheel model is a bit more stable).
As for the vain thing, it comes with stubborness.

That sized scooter will not work for a 6 foot tall/225 pound man.

katisdale
June 5th, 2009, 12:28 PM
I am female but 6 feet 2 inches tall and unfortunately outweigh your husband (but only barely). I have a standard scooter that I use around my neighborhood. I purchased a travelscoot expressly for travel. I am amazed how well it works for me. Although it is small it has power and only weighs 35 pounds TOTAL. It collapses into a duffel bag which my DH can handle easily although we have also purchased a hard sided golf bag carrier which it fits in and that has wheels so he says that is even easier. My only caveats about the scooter are that there is no reverse (if I need to reverse I push with my feet) and you must use the brakes to slow or stop the scooter. My big scooter stops automatically when I release the drive, but I have to remember to use the brakes on the travelscoot.

Queenie2
June 5th, 2009, 12:34 PM
I agree with uppity. The compact scooters do have weight limits. Many, like the scootie have a 250 pound weight limit, but I have to say that they really do better with lighter people. They tend to really bog down when they carry someone 225 or so. Best bet is to invest in a full-size scooter, which will have more pep an be able to accommodate your husband. As for getting to the dining room table (or elsewhere), why not just carry a folding cane in the basket? It also comes in handy for opening doors. My advice is to shop around and test drive a lot of scooters, so your husband finds something that is comfortable for him, and has the pep he needs.

Candy

WheelieBob
June 5th, 2009, 01:48 PM
You sound exactly like me a few years back. First he didn't want the cane -- I went ahead and bought it and he agreed that it was very helpful. Next we went on a land vacation and we had real difficulty with the walking and the heat (he has MS), but he didn't need anything more than the cane :rolleyes: The next land vacation we went on was for our 25th wedding anniversary and we renewed our vows on the beach. My gift for him was a scooter. Well, there was no looking back for him. The scooter gave him such independence and he can now go where he wants, when he wants -- he loves it.

I would suggest that you rent one for your cruise. Once he tries it and sees how awesome it is, I'm sure you will have no trouble talking him into buying one when you get home. I would change the booking to a HC cabin so you can get the scooter in the room and so you have the extra space for it.

Good luck, let us know how you make out

Mrs. Wheelie

Harleycat
June 5th, 2009, 01:54 PM
Doesn't make a difference if male or female when it comes to Pride. it's hard to accept that one might need to use mobility equipment at all and than have to progress to a scooter. It's hard to accept that but we all get over it when we realize it changes are life for the better.

You might try this approach. Would suggest stressing to DH that it's not about whether or not he needs a scooter for long term use. Instead it's all about energy managment, expanding ones independance and both of you enjoying the vacation. It also needs to be stressed to DH that he places you at great risk when he expects you to support him while he uses only a cane. What happens if you were to fall and hurt yourself in the process ? You'd be of no use to him. The scooter will help him to realize that independence is greater that trying to save pride.

I suggested this approach to a friend of mine and than she just rented the scooter. It's has changed her husband's whole thinking about a scooter. In fact since he now will use a scooter when traveling, they take more cruises. She comes back having felt as though she had a vacation with her husband rather than feeling like an overworked/underappreciated caregiver.

To answer your other questions
No he will will not look foolish using a scooter. There will be many others on the ship. The rental company will take height /weight into consideration so he gets the appropriate scooter. Also ask the to properly adjust the seat height before delivering it to the cabin. There will be many others on the ship.

For dining : he'll drive the scooter right up to the dining table. Transfer into a chair and the waiter will store with scooter and return it after dinner.

You got that right, we had the hardest time getting mom to use any assisted walking devices. I finally had to put my foot down when she was staying with me after surgery. I said she had to use the walker or go somewhere that had professional staff to take care of her. I'm just not physically capable of assisting someone everywhere since I'm disabled.

My sister usually takes her shopping and found it was getting harder and harder to get things done because, at 87, she's just not as mobile as she used to be. My sister suggested getting a WC just to keep in the car for shopping. My mother was horrified at the suggestion and called me crying. Several months later mom decided it was a good idea.

Hei1980
June 5th, 2009, 02:21 PM
I've used both a scooter (full size) and a power wheelchair
on many cruises. It certainly was a better choice
than when I used crutches and thus was limited in time I could
be out and about as well as distance I could walk.
And with the crutches I was often worried about falling.

I suggest you rent a scooter for your next cruise. It will
be delivered to your cabin for your use on the ship and
at ports. Then you leave it in your cabin when you depart.

The rental company will determine the size needed. Check
with your cruise line - some require rentals for specific companies.



Concerning the renting of the scooter; in December we will be on two 8 day cruises, BTB. The cost of the rental would be more than the $800.00 scooter. Will try to find somewhere for DH to give it a test run, size-wise. We were at Sam's Club and he used an electric cart; ah freedom, he looked 10 years younger and wore a wonderful smile on his face the whole time!

georgiac
June 5th, 2009, 02:51 PM
I am female but 6 feet 2 inches tall and unfortunately outweigh your husband (but only barely). I have a standard scooter that I use around my neighborhood. I purchased a travelscoot expressly for travel. I am amazed how well it works for me. Although it is small it has power and only weighs 35 pounds TOTAL. It collapses into a duffel bag which my DH can handle easily although we have also purchased a hard sided golf bag carrier which it fits in and that has wheels so he says that is even easier. My only caveats about the scooter are that there is no reverse (if I need to reverse I push with my feet) and you must use the brakes to slow or stop the scooter. My big scooter stops automatically when I release the drive, but I have to remember to use the brakes on the travelscoot.
I am considering the travelscoot based on your testimony and what I have read on their site. Is there any more you can tell me regarding accelerating and any other feelings? We are avid cruisers but now I am experiencing foot and endurance problems.
Georgia

Arwenmark
June 5th, 2009, 03:47 PM
DH has fought me when he needed a cane, then another fight concerning a walker; now it is the scooter. What to do? It turned out I was right about the cane and about the walker. Know his life would be easier with the scooter. It takes all of his strength to walk a short distance. I am not strong enough to push him in a wheelchair for any amount of time.

Sorry, guys, but men are very vain and I think he feels to have a scooter small enough to be of service on a cruise ship he would look foolish being 225 lbs and 6 ft tall. Too big for something that small. He also worries about going to the dining room, what to do with the scooter and how does he get to the table without his walker? My answer is this; I am 5’2” tall and he could use me and a cane.
Now, do I just go ahead and order the scooter?

The fact you have a Cat 11 cabin does not mean that a scooter will fit through the door.
when you have a scooter you need an HC cabin. the smaller travel models will not work for someone that is large. If you get one he will then be SURE he does not want a scooter period and won't get a regular one when he needs one.
buy a regular one and change to an HC cabin if you can still get one.
As to the dining room it is no problem you ride the scooter as close as it can get to the table then the staff will ride it back to a parking area and return it when you want to leave.

elizbbw
June 5th, 2009, 04:37 PM
Georgia, I have a TraveScoot too, and have been using it for months with very good results. I'm 5'6" tall and over 400 lbs and amazingly, the TravelScoot works wonderfully for me. I'm keeping a blog about it, at http://mytravelscoot.blogspot.com, if you'd like to read more.

With a 180-lb person the TravelScoot will go a maximum of 6 mph. At my weight it flies fast enough that I feel the breeze in my hair. I can't imagine wanting it to go any faster than it does. I have the lithium ion battery, and it's tested to go for 8 miles. There's more interesting battery information on the TravelScoot website, at http://www.TravelScoot.com/batteries.htm.

I haven't taken mine on a cruise yet, but I'll be doing that next March. My scooter weighs 35 lbs., with the battery, and I can break it down and put it in the trunk of my Camry in about a minute. It folds up like an umbrella.

My problem is endurance and my knees. I can walk short distances just fine, and have good balance. I really just need help with distances. My TravelScoot helps me be independent. I don't need it at work, but with it I'm able to shop and do other things by myself. I especially like it that I can lift it in and out of my car with no assistance.

Elizabeth

elizbbw
June 5th, 2009, 04:57 PM
Hei,

I read a book titled "When Walking Fails," by By Lisa I. Iezzoni. She's a doctor who has MS and uses a scooter to get around. I highly recommend the book, and I believe there are many points made in it that will help you convince your husband to use mobility aids if he needs them.

It sounds like your husband is probably also doing something she calls "furniture surfing" where you move around your home by going from one piece of furniture to another. I didn't realize I was doing that until I read this book. Or since he holds onto you, maybe we should call it PEOPLE surfing!

I believe this book is now out of print, but many copies are available on eBay for $1.95 each with reasonable shipping.

Being able to move freely without pain or fear of injury is nothing short of liberating. I hope this is one fight you both win.

Elizabeth



DH has fought me when he needed a cane, then another fight concerning a walker; now it is the scooter. What to do? It turned out I was right about the cane and about the walker. Know his life would be easier with the scooter. It takes all of his strength to walk a short distance. I am not strong enough to push him in a wheelchair for any amount of time.

Sorry, guys, but men are very vain and I think he feels to have a scooter small enough to be of service on a cruise ship he would look foolish being 225 lbs and 6 ft tall. Too big for something that small. He also worries about going to the dining room, what to do with the scooter and how does he get to the table without his walker? My answer is this; I am 5’2” tall and he could use me and a cane.
Now, do I just go ahead and order the scooter?

Hei1980
June 5th, 2009, 06:42 PM
The fact you have a Cat 11 cabin does not mean that a scooter will fit through the door.
when you have a scooter you need an HC cabin. the smaller travel models will not work for someone that is large. If you get one he will then be SURE he does not want a scooter period and won't get a regular one when he needs one.
buy a regular one and change to an HC cabin if you can still get one.
As to the dining room it is no problem you ride the scooter as close as it can get to the table then the staff will ride it back to a parking area and return it when you want to leave.

Here is the rub: we have booked a cat 11 aft wrap. DH would rather travel in this cabin than with me. He loves it! Not to say he does not love me, ok; it’s a toss up. I think? I believe the scooter being 19” wide would fit in this cabin. (?) The cabin has a long hallway and should not be a problem. I hope?

katisdale
June 5th, 2009, 07:32 PM
GeorgiaC, I was surprised how easily the travelscoot handled upgrades. At first I was afraid that if I didn't have enough speed built up before I tried the grade that I would not make it. This was not the case. It handles upgrades very well. The handbrakes also do well on down grades but I haven't tried a really steep one. Since I am so tall I was very pleased that the seat has inserts that can be used to raise it which is much better for me as I have trouble standing. It does fold up amazingly quickly. We bought two of the lithium batteries so if needed I could trade one out and keep on going if we were on a long excursion. This has not been necessary yet.

Starr Mtn
June 5th, 2009, 08:49 PM
Hei1980


Depending on your situation - please remember that
Medicare covers the cost of a scooter and/or wheelchair
(believe it is 80%). If you have secondary coverage,
that will cover the remainder of the cost.

xxoocruiser
June 5th, 2009, 09:51 PM
Hei1980


Depending on your situation - please remember that
Medicare covers the cost of a scooter and/or wheelchair
(believe it is 80%). If you have secondary coverage,
that will cover the remainder of the cost.

Medicare (CMS) has very strict requirements that must be met in order to qualify for reimbursment . Medicare does not reimburse for a Travel scooters . The scooter has to be for the primary use within your residence and you must not be able to operate a manual wheelchair. Also Medicare will only cover once in a 5 year period if needed for your primary use with you residence. The following coverage criteria must all be met in order for Medicare to approve a mobility scooter. The rules change so you need to check with Medicare .


The patient is unable to operate a manual wheelchair within his or her residence and would otherwise be confined to bed.
The patient is capable of safely operating the controls for the scooter.
The patient can transfer safely in and out of the scooter, and have adequate trunk stability for safety.
The patient's condition must be such that a POV is required for the patient to get around WITHIN his or her residence. A POV that is beneficial primarily in allowing the patient to perform leisure or recreational activities will be denied as a non medically necessity.

cusyl
June 5th, 2009, 11:48 PM
Hei1980


Depending on your situation - please remember that
Medicare covers the cost of a scooter and/or wheelchair
(believe it is 80%). If you have secondary coverage,
that will cover the remainder of the cost.
Medicare will not pay for a travel scooter, I have looked into it. They will only pay for a power chair for you to get around in your home if you can't walk.

elizbbw
June 6th, 2009, 01:00 AM
There's also a modification Hardy Huber (the TravelScoot inventor) will make for taller people if it's needed. He can modify where the footrests are mounted. There's a picture of it on my blog:

http://mytravelscoot.blogspot.com/2009/03/footrest-modification.html

I have one lithium ion battery and haven't had a need for a second one yet, but would like to get one eventually, just in case.

The only time I've needed to use the brakes has been on down grades, and then they come in really handy. Normally I just let off the throttle and my TravelScoot stops. Putting my feet down helps stop it quicker too.

Elizabeth

GeorgiaC, I was surprised how easily the travelscoot handled upgrades. At first I was afraid that if I didn't have enough speed built up before I tried the grade that I would not make it. This was not the case. It handles upgrades very well. The handbrakes also do well on down grades but I haven't tried a really steep one. Since I am so tall I was very pleased that the seat has inserts that can be used to raise it which is much better for me as I have trouble standing. It does fold up amazingly quickly. We bought two of the lithium batteries so if needed I could trade one out and keep on going if we were on a long excursion. This has not been necessary yet.

uppitycats
June 6th, 2009, 07:01 AM
I just checked out the travelscoot site. It says quite clearly that a purchase of this is not covered by Medicare. It also doesn't look all that stable for anyone who might have balance problems, but might well serve for folks who can't walk long distances but otherwise are mobile.

JNCRUISEBUMS
June 6th, 2009, 11:52 AM
Medicare will not pay for a travel scooter, I have looked into it. They will only pay for a power chair for you to get around in your home if you can't walk.
They paid for a Pride GoGo Elite for me!!!!!! It's small enough to travel with, it's been on 3 cruises now! Nancie

uppitycats
June 6th, 2009, 01:07 PM
They paid for a Pride GoGo Elite for me!!!!!! It's small enough to travel with, it's been on 3 cruises now! Nancie

You were lucky that you were able to get it. It's a pretty rare occurrence.

serene56
June 6th, 2009, 01:11 PM
when a friend of ours used a scooter on the Liberty-- he wheeled to the table and the waiter took it to park it someplace safe.
It made it very manageable for our friend to get around the ship.

The problem with a scooter-- it might not fit into your cabin- so you will have to take it to the pursers desk for recharging

Queenie2
June 6th, 2009, 03:03 PM
what others have written is correct. medicare does not pay for assistive devices to help people outside of the home. It's been a great bone of contention for years. Basically you have to need the device (wheelchair, scooter) to get around in your home. And they won't approve it if you can use a manual wheelchair. They even disallow some upgrades on power chairs that would enable people to get around outside and become more independent. Plus in the past year or so, they have really cracked down on scooters, as there were a lot of companies advertising them "free - medicare covers it all" on TV. Things have really changed and tightened up. Getting coverage by any kin of assistive device that offers independence outside the home is almost impossible.

Oh, an when I said "try out" a scooter before you buy it, I meant go to a dealer to see what they offer, and try out different models there. You should also make it a point to give it a test ride outside, on different surfaces an up and down curb cuts if possible.

Candy

maw
June 6th, 2009, 03:55 PM
My husband uses a wheel chair in the house but does everything in outside on his scooter. I purchased the scooters at the local Durable Equipment supply at Hospital. We rented them for first time on a curise. I rented them for less than $100 for a month much less than rentals I have seen We have them now to get around airports and pre cruise -after we saw how well they worked we purchased them for abt 1/2 regular price. I have difficulty walking distances so sure are great on cruise.

elizbbw
June 6th, 2009, 05:26 PM
I do know that the TravelScoot fits through the cabin door, and if it didn't, it EASILY folds like an umbrella to go through the door or to store in a small place. My TravelScoot battery weighs less than 6 pounds and I plug it directly into the charger, so the scooter itself doesn't need to be near where it's being charged.

I haven't been on a cruise yet with a scooter, but it's great to hear all the comments about how well it works. My cruise is next March.

when a friend of ours used a scooter on the Liberty-- he wheeled to the table and the waiter took it to park it someplace safe.
It made it very manageable for our friend to get around the ship.

The problem with a scooter-- it might not fit into your cabin- so you will have to take it to the pursers desk for recharging

cusyl
June 7th, 2009, 08:39 AM
I think the Scoot is 23 inches wide so you would have to fold it. It sounds like a great scooter for one person to handle. I hate the price of that light weight battery though.:eek:

cusyl
June 7th, 2009, 08:43 AM
They paid for a Pride GoGo Elite for me!!!!!! It's small enough to travel with, it's been on 3 cruises now! Nancie
How did you manage that? I've talked to about all the companies and they have told me otherwise. How long have you had yours?

Hei1980
June 7th, 2009, 10:12 AM
Nancie; any problems with your Go-Go and door openings on your cruise?

mdvlprof
June 7th, 2009, 03:34 PM
Looked at company website. Think I'll get one as soon as I can afford it.

(Main concern on other posts has been for son, but I have mobility issues of my own since stroke.):cool:

There's also a modification Hardy Huber (the TravelScoot inventor) will make for taller people if it's needed. He can modify where the footrests are mounted. There's a picture of it on my blog:

http://mytravelscoot.blogspot.com/2009/03/footrest-modification.html

I have one lithium ion battery and haven't had a need for a second one yet, but would like to get one eventually, just in case.

The only time I've needed to use the brakes has been on down grades, and then they come in really handy. Normally I just let off the throttle and my TravelScoot stops. Putting my feet down helps stop it quicker too.

Elizabeth

Splinter
June 7th, 2009, 04:31 PM
Nancy, you must have gotten your scooter more than 2 years ago which is when Medicare significantly tightened up their rules. You would not get a scooter now if you could walk in your home, and Medicare clearly states that they will not buy a scooter or power wheelchair for community mobility only (ie, travel, getting to the market, going to the zoo, or taking a cruise). Even getting one for use in the home is only possible now if you have an evaluation by a RESNA credentialed therapist, who must indicate in their evaluation that you cannot use a manual wheelchair in your home.

vickila
June 8th, 2009, 01:22 PM
For stability purposes I purchased a Golden Companion II -- comes apart into 3 sections - fits in a Nissan Maxima. It's very rugged and takes a beating - cobblestones, hard pressed sand, does ramps well - large under clearance, foam filled tires (very important), comfy seat, lots of power. Highly recommended.

We just did a cabin crawl on the Explorer of the Seas -- accessible cabin is the only one it would go through, except for Suite. Accessible cabins are lovely, about 1-1/2 size of regular and give you turning area. Go see the maitre d' in the dining room as soon as you board to get an appropriate table. Scooter can go right up to the table and they LOVE parking them and returning them to you. Any scooter gives you a sense of independence and it's fun. Vicki:)

nieciez
June 9th, 2009, 09:47 AM
I am considering purchasing a Travelscoot for our upcoming Transatlantic cruise on Carnival Dream and will be using it pre-cruise in Rome. Has anyone had any experience with using s Scooter in Rome, Malaga or Barcelona?

Kati or Elizabeth, how often do you need to replace the belts on your Travelscoot? I see where you can order extras. Though I am a large gal, almost 250, Hardy recommended the Jr. Scoot for me as I am 4’11”. I too have bad knees and endurance issues when walking.

ZellaLamb
June 9th, 2009, 12:25 PM
A quick answer to your question about Rome, Malaga and Barcelona: Spain is much more accommodating than Italy. Barcelona is completely accessible. Malaga is difficult but not impossible, Rome was much more difficult. For all of them, it depends on the scooter and the user. If bumping along cobblestones bothers you or your back, you need a sturdier scooter with bigger tires. If you can get off when you encounter curbs and let your companion lift the scooter up over them, then almost anything is possible.

katisdale
June 9th, 2009, 08:32 PM
I found Rome rather difficult. I was using a rollator then and even with that had trouble. There are very few curb cuts and when I was able to find a cut there was almost always a car parked in front of the cut. However I did have a great time at the coloseum as it has an elevator. The vatican museum was difficult as it is very spread out with lots of different levels and stairs without lifts between the levels. However the Sistine Chapel can be reached with stair lifts. My only problem with the Sistine was how crowded it was and as everyone was looking up I was constantly being bumped. St. Peter's was easily accessible. There are ramps to get to the main area. The pieta and the altar are both awe inspiring. I could not go down to the crypts (stairs again).

Donna & Bob
June 10th, 2009, 12:22 PM
I have MS and haven't been able to walk in over two years. We go on a cruise every year as it is the best vacation for people with a disability. I have taken my scooter for the last two years and will be taking it again on the Carribean Princess on June 20th. The scooter gets around the ship very well, as it is a large one with a high clearance. It isn't easy with excursions as it doesn't fold down like a travel scooter. I also have two travel scooters, but I am afraid of getting stuck on the ship because of the low clearance, so I take my large scooter. I also take a wheelchair (my husband loads our luggage on it and pushes it), just in case there is something I need to do that the scooter won't work for.

I have had no problem with the dining room, the spa, or the theater. I always book early to get an accessible cabin. I get one with a balcony that I can even scoot out onto. If people bring a scooter and it doesn't fit in their room, they leave it in the hall (which is not allowed). I had a cabin across from me two year's ago that left the scooter in the hall and I had no room to pull in or back out of my cabin because of it. My husband would have to move the other scooter, until we complained. It really is a fire hazard to block the halls.

I have taken my scooter to Bermuda, St. Thomas, Nova Scotia, Bay of Fundy, Maine. I have been able to get on the smaller boats that take passengers when the ship can't dock (tethering??).

Believe me, as a person who can't walk, it is so much nicer being independent and not having to count on others to get you around. You and your husband will be happier for it...trust me!:)

Hei1980
June 10th, 2009, 02:09 PM
I have MS and haven't been able to walk in over two years. We go on a cruise every year as it is the best vacation for people with a disability. I have taken my scooter for the last two years and will be taking it again on the Carribean Princess on June 20th. The scooter gets around the ship very well, as it is a large one with a high clearance. It isn't easy with excursions as it doesn't fold down like a travel scooter. I also have two travel scooters, but I am afraid of getting stuck on the ship because of the low clearance, so I take my large scooter. I also take a wheelchair (my husband loads our luggage on it and pushes it), just in case there is something I need to do that the scooter won't work for.

I have had no problem with the dining room, the spa, or the theater. I always book early to get an accessible cabin. I get one with a balcony that I can even scoot out onto. If people bring a scooter and it doesn't fit in their room, they leave it in the hall (which is not allowed). I had a cabin across from me two year's ago that left the scooter in the hall and I had no room to pull in or back out of my cabin because of it. My husband would have to move the other scooter, until we complained. It really is a fire hazard to block the halls.

I have taken my scooter to Bermuda, St. Thomas, Nova Scotia, Bay of Fundy, Maine. I have been able to get on the smaller boats that take passengers when the ship can't dock (tethering??).

Believe me, as a person who can't walk, it is so much nicer being independent and not having to count on others to get you around. You and your husband will be happier for it...trust me!:)

Good to hear, thanks.

usavvy2
July 11th, 2009, 11:46 PM
Hei,

I read a book titled "When Walking Fails," by By Lisa I. Iezzoni. She's a doctor who has MS and uses a scooter to get around. I highly recommend the book, and I believe there are many points made in it that will help you convince your husband to use mobility aids if he needs them.

...I believe this book is now out of print, but many copies are available on eBay for $1.95 each with reasonable shipping. ...Elizabeth

Thanks for the tip about the book. I found it for less than $1 (plus shipping $3.49) at half.com .

elizbbw
July 12th, 2009, 01:25 AM
I hope you find information in the book that helps you. I enjoyed reading it.

Elizabeth

Thanks for the tip about the book. I found it for less than $1 (plus shipping $3.49) at half.com .

eigig
July 12th, 2009, 12:08 PM
Yes thanks for the info on the book; I will get a copy for myself.

My husband also has MS and progressed from cane to scooter--he also was adverse to using either but the cane was a necessity. On our first cruise (The QM2 no less) he used a cane and was virtually captive in the cabin except to go to dinner! The next year he still refused the scooter and same thing happened only that time we left from NYC (where we live) so we did not have the airport to deal with.
However, he was worn out from just walking to dinner and then got cranky and I bore the brunt of his frustration.

By the third cruise the next year, I had decided I really needed him to use a scooter. He still resisted but I insisted which is not something I normally would do regarding his mobility. I rented one. We had a mini suite on HAL cause he refused to book a HC room.

Well the difference was outstanding! We enjoyed ourselves so much that we bought a Pride go go. The only problem I have now is keeping up with him on the ship :D. Also he swears that a venue is on one end of the ship and then scoots off and I am following in formal gown and heels only to find that it is on the other end of the ship and off he scoots again! It is really quite fun and I am only jokingly complaining. We have used it on the plane too and he rides it to the gate and they check it and it is waiting when we get off.

It is a good idea to buy it if he will go along with you on that. He uses it infrequently when not travelling but he finds that it is better to scoot to the party and be able to enjoy it and not worry about getting back to your car than to drag himself there and then be exhausted.

So sometimes you need to put it in terms of your own needs and calmly and thoughtfully express your own needs and feelings.

Have fun cruising--it is the BEST for those with mobility issues!

Hei1980
July 16th, 2009, 03:54 PM
After reading your post I feel I married your husband’s brother.

<he also was adverse to using either but the cane was a necessity. On our first cruise (The QM2 no less) he used a cane and was virtually captive in the cabin except to go to dinner! The next year he still refused the scooter and same thing happened only that time we left from NYC (where we live) so we did not have the airport to deal with.
However, he was worn out from just walking to dinner and then got cranky and I bore the brunt of his frustration.>

DH is still fighting me on the scooter; I keep singing “I am woman and I am strong.” Time will tell.

ryouthr
July 17th, 2009, 03:29 PM
I'm the woman in the marriage who has been through all the stages. Not trying to do the macho thing, just trying to conserve my energy so that I can do more with the addition of mobility aids. Now I'm in a scooter or WC full time, but I love it and don't miss the days of hobbling around; exhausting myself; and being afraid I'll fall. I've also read and recommend When Walking Fails: I read my town library's copy at no cost!

eigig
July 19th, 2009, 06:52 PM
After reading your post I feel I married your husband’s brother.

<he also was adverse to using either but the cane was a necessity. On our first cruise (The QM2 no less) he used a cane and was virtually captive in the cabin except to go to dinner! The next year he still refused the scooter and same thing happened only that time we left from NYC (where we live) so we did not have the airport to deal with.
However, he was worn out from just walking to dinner and then got cranky and I bore the brunt of his frustration.>

DH is still fighting me on the scooter; I keep singing “I am woman and I am strong.” Time will tell.

I truly understand his reluctance. It is a difficult step to take. It was only when I told my husband that "I" needed it for my sanity/enjoyment/back etc that he did listen. He is, understandably, pre occupied with his needs but when I put it in terms of MY needs (again calmly, gently and lovingly) that he saw what his crankiness and demands were doing to me.

Still fights and "wall walks" and takes chances he should not take. However, our niece is getting married at a garden wedding and this summer and he has agreed to take the scooter.

Enjoy and Best wishes for many more happy cruises!