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#21
Philadelphia area
600 Posts
Joined Jul 2010
In response to my previous contribution:
Originally posted by pdmlynek
... But considering what you’ll see in Alaska, the experience of the Inside Passage is relatively minor. There are bigger things to weigh when considering an Alaska cruise.
user LEtue wrote:

Originally posted by LEtue
Totally disagree and the difference can be huge if the first port of call is Juneau. I made the mistake of sailing from Seattle once on HAL's Oosterdam and land was barely visible on the first full day at sea. And the arrival into Juneau was in the early morning so unless you stayed up all night you missed most of the scenic views in the area. ...
I stand by my statement. Here is why:

The ship doing the “Inside Passage” northbound leaves Vancouver at 16:30 to 16:58 or so, and arrives at the Seymour Narrows around 23:30 or 23:45, as you have stated. It then takes about 8 hours to go through the Johnstone Strait, until it emerges into the Queen Charlotte Sound around 7:30 or 8:30. Once it enters the Sound, it will stay away from land until it exits the Dixon Entrance into the Alexander Archipelago.

LEtue, you saw the Narrows at midnight, and I saw the Strait from about 4:00 to 8:00. You enjoyed the Inside Passage, and I enjoyed the Inside Passage. But we are among very few people to see that. A few lucky ones who get up at 7:00 will see a handful of islands in God’s Pocket park. But the vast majority of people will sleep through the Inside Passage, or will not take it in. They will miss seeing the Inside Passage.

So, unless a person is willing to forego the typical sleeping hours, there is very little that choosing the NB “Inside Passage” will do for the person.
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#22
14,683 Posts
Joined Jan 2004
Originally posted by pdmlynek

I stand by my statement. Here is why:

The ship doing the “Inside Passage” northbound leaves Vancouver at 16:30 to 16:58 or so, and arrives at the Seymour Narrows around 23:30 or 23:45, as you have stated. It then takes about 8 hours to go through the Johnstone Strait, until it emerges into the Queen Charlotte Sound around 7:30 or 8:30. Once it enters the Sound, it will stay away from land until it exits the Dixon Entrance into the Alexander Archipelago.

LEtue, you saw the Narrows at midnight, and I saw the Strait from about 4:00 to 8:00. You enjoyed the Inside Passage, and I enjoyed the Inside Passage. But we are among very few people to see that. A few lucky ones who get up at 7:00 will see a handful of islands in God’s Pocket park. But the vast majority of people will sleep through the Inside Passage, or will not take it in. They will miss seeing the Inside Passage.

So, unless a person is willing to forego the typical sleeping hours, there is very little that choosing the NB “Inside Passage” will do for the person.
I agree with you. Until I passed through the Seymour Narrows in broad daylight on day 2 (see previous page) - I had NO idea what I was missing on a previous cruise out of Vancouver while I slept. On that cruise - we woke up to the tail end of land on both sides.
#23
24,233 Posts
Joined Jul 2001
Originally posted by pdmlynek
I
LEtue, you saw the Narrows at midnight, and I saw the Strait from about 4:00 to 8:00. You enjoyed the Inside Passage, and I enjoyed the Inside Passage. But we are among very few people to see that. A few lucky ones who get up at 7:00 will see a handful of islands in God’s Pocket park. But the vast majority of people will sleep through the Inside Passage, or will not take it in. They will miss seeing the Inside Passage.

So, unless a person is willing to forego the typical sleeping hours, there is very little that choosing the NB “Inside Passage” will do for the person.
We left extremely late (probably 4 hours late) on our last cruise out of Vancouver which proved to be very beneficial for our viewing
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#24
Syracuse, New York
49,366 Posts
Joined May 2000
I will speculate there aren't a lot of trips involved here?? There are MANY different routes within the "inside passage". VARIOUS times for transits etc. I have been all the way back to Vancouver at dusk, compared to it being dark before Campbell River on a southbound, and I have had, scenic sailing northbound of the upper Vancover Island/Queen Charlotte Islands into the afternoon.

I did three cruises this year. All had their scenic highlights and none were any "disappointment". I spend a significant amount of time out on deck, clearly much more than most. Both directions are loaded with highlights.
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#25
California
2,122 Posts
Joined Feb 2012
I have to disagree that you don't see anything the first sea day sailing out of Seattle. We followed the coast line the day we sailed and for at least half the next day. We had a starboard side aft corner suite on the Westerdam and we spent most of our 1st sea day on our balcony. We enjoyed views of the coast for at least half the day. Then we went exploring the ship, so I don't know when we lost sight of land.

Both of these pics were taken on our sea day heading from Seattle to Juneau


100 some of the rugged coast line by Rescue-Diver, on Flickr


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101 rugged coast line by Rescue-Diver, on Flickr
#26
Syracuse, New York
49,366 Posts
Joined May 2000
Originally posted by NoobCruise
I have to disagree that you don't see anything the first sea day sailing out of Seattle. We followed the coast line the day we sailed and for at least half the next day. We had a starboard side aft corner suite on the Westerdam and we spent most of our 1st sea day on our balcony. We enjoyed views of the coast for at least half the day. Then we went exploring the ship, so I don't know when we lost sight of land.

Both of these pics were taken on our sea day heading from Seattle to Juneau


100 some of the rugged coast line by Rescue-Diver, on Flickr


[/url]
101 rugged coast line by Rescue-Diver, on Flickr
This confirms my above comment on the multiple routes a ship can take. I have also sailed out of Seatte with NO coastal view except a way off with binoculars.

Your single trip had viewing. Some more may have as well. BUT, you can not count on it with any round trip Seattle sailings.
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