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  #1  
Old November 15th, 2012, 01:36 AM
altiva altiva is offline
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Default Have you ever tried Ukrainian cuisine?

Hi people.
Have you ever tried Ukrainian cuisine?
Where did you try it?
What dishes did you eat?
Did you like it or not?
Thank you for your answers.
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  #2  
Old November 15th, 2012, 05:45 AM
altiva altiva is offline
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And if you have never tried it, would you like to?
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  #3  
Old November 18th, 2012, 07:00 PM
romrai romrai is offline
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Default all the time

Unfortunately not on a cruise. brought up on them and still cook them myself (only because mom isn't here)

my usual are. Perogies, petiheh(sp?) potato dumplings with/ cottage cheese, cheddar, onions, bacon, plums. wrapped in dough. boiled and/or fried in butter. served with butter and onions or in the case of plums, brown sugar.

holobski/cabbage rolls. my favorite are with bacon and onion, (no ground beef) and rice.

kobassa/garlic sausage....speaks for itself.
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  #4  
Old November 19th, 2012, 08:34 AM
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Bookish Angel Bookish Angel is offline
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Default Perogies are delicious!

I love the potato and onion ones. Cabbage rolls are wonderful, too. I don't eat beef anymore but the vegetarian ones with just the sauce and rice are so good.
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  #5  
Old November 19th, 2012, 09:44 AM
altiva altiva is offline
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Hi people,
thank you for your replies, I appreciate them a lot!
The dumpings wrapped in dough are called varenyki. There are main
course varenyki (with potatoes, cabbage, meat) and the desert variety
(with cherries an cottage cheese), sweet ones.
The cabbage rolls are holubtsi.
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  #6  
Old January 27th, 2013, 10:56 AM
altiva altiva is offline
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Ukrainian cuisine is the best in the world.
It consist of what people call "healthy food". At the same time,
it's not tasteless cardboard-like chew. It's extremely tasty, and you
can eat it with clear conscience, knowing that it's all good for you.
It's not for nothing, in Ukraine, when you start eating, people say
"For your health" (eat to improve your health).
Ukrainian food is the world's answer for the fusion of healthy and
tasty.
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  #7  
Old February 6th, 2013, 03:55 PM
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shellyfronk shellyfronk is offline
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My daughter in law is Ukranian. She makes a lot of dishes with potatoes, soups (always with potatoes), pulmeni (meat dumplings/sour cream), buckwheat (but calls it Kashka, with a K), and also eats from the russian/ukranian stores and restaurants, gizzard stew, tongue, lots of different types of sausages, and smoked cheeses. My son went to the Ukraine with her last year and tried all sorts of new things. However, what is very common is that foods grown in the summer are canned for all winter use, so they would not have strawberry preserves till winter, and some vegetables that were canned. Generally, the Ukranians use all parts of the animal and parts that Americans would normally toss in the garbage are eaten regularly i.e. pig's ear, cartiledge, tongue gizzards etc. We have learned to eat some new dishes and happily give her parts that we don't normally eat too!
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  #8  
Old February 24th, 2013, 03:47 PM
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There are many types of Ukrainian bread. There is palyanytsya, kolach, korovai. I will post it. Now, I have a photo of korovai - this is a bread, specially made for weddings. The flowers on the bread, they are called "cones" (like cones from a pine). The cones are very crunchy, and they are salty. They give them to children to eat. They are very yummy.





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  #9  
Old March 1st, 2013, 03:49 PM
altiva altiva is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by romrai View Post
Unfortunately not on a cruise. brought up on them and still cook them myself (only because mom isn't here)

my usual are. Perogies, petiheh(sp?) potato dumplings with/ cottage cheese, cheddar, onions, bacon, plums. wrapped in dough. boiled and/or fried in butter. served with butter and onions or in the case of plums, brown sugar.

holobski/cabbage rolls. my favorite are with bacon and onion, (no ground beef) and rice.

kobassa/garlic sausage....speaks for itself.
hi Romrai,
pyrogy are pies. Like apple pie, cherry pie.
One - pyrig, many - pyrogy.
Then there are litle pies, called pyrizhky.
And there are varenyky.
They can be filled with anything - meat, potatoes, cheese, plumps, cherries, cabbage and so on.


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  #10  
Old March 1st, 2013, 04:06 PM
altiva altiva is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shellyfronk View Post
My daughter in law is Ukranian. She makes a lot of dishes with potatoes, soups (always with potatoes), pulmeni (meat dumplings/sour cream), buckwheat (but calls it Kashka, with a K), and also eats from the russian/ukranian stores and restaurants, gizzard stew, tongue, lots of different types of sausages, and smoked cheeses. My son went to the Ukraine with her last year and tried all sorts of new things. However, what is very common is that foods grown in the summer are canned for all winter use, so they would not have strawberry preserves till winter, and some vegetables that were canned. Generally, the Ukranians use all parts of the animal and parts that Americans would normally toss in the garbage are eaten regularly i.e. pig's ear, cartiledge, tongue gizzards etc. We have learned to eat some new dishes and happily give her parts that we don't normally eat too!
Great answer, Shelly, sounds like your daughter in law is ethnic Russian from Ukraine, because pelmeni are definitely Russian food.
Ukrainians do love making preserves, from fruit and vegetables, and eat them in winter:


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  #11  
Old March 3rd, 2013, 12:13 PM
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Spring arrived.
The Ukrainian traditional soup is called borsch.
Foreign people frequently called the borsch - a soup with beet
roots. I am always amazed, because there is no more than one spoon
full of beet roots in the whole soup. Rather, I would have called it a
"tomato soup".
There are different kinds of borsch.
There is borsch, borsch with mushrooms, borsch with a carp, borsch
with pampushki.
In spring, Ukrainian people
make green borsch. The green borsch is made from sorrel. It has a
light taste. It tastes like spring. In Ukraine, they say "spring
freshness came to your table".


This is a photo of a green borsch in a restaurant. The restaurant
bakes the bread. Then, they take the middle of the bread out. They
pour the borsch inside the bread. Then, you can eat it! You eat the
bread also.
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  #12  
Old March 3rd, 2013, 12:14 PM
altiva altiva is offline
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Anybody hungry yet?
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  #13  
Old March 3rd, 2013, 12:52 PM
altiva altiva is offline
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More Ukrainian preserves...
The first person to guess what it is receives one jar!
:-)))
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  #14  
Old March 11th, 2013, 09:29 AM
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Today is a start of Maslenytsya in Ukraine.
It's the last week before the great Easter fast, when people are not
supposed to eat dairy, fish and meat. Many Ukrainian restaurants will have
a fast menu added to accommodate people who are fasting.
Maslenytsya means "buttery". You are supposed to stuff yourself with
pancakes this week. And they are supposed to be fried on real butter.
Ukrainians love butter and add it to many dishes. Vareniky
(dumplings) must "swim" in butter, for example.
Here is a Ukrainian woman, making butter at home. You can buy real
home made butter on farmer's markets.

Ukrainian pancakes are called nalysnyky.
It's pancakes, stuffed with rice, meat, buckwheat, berries, cheese
(the cheese ones are sweet, they add sugar and raisins to them).
These are the ones with cheese. You eat them with sour cream.


Besides pancakes, people eat different sausages, salo (lard), meat,
paltry.
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  #15  
Old March 11th, 2013, 11:00 AM
altiva altiva is offline
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Nalysnyky with raspberries.
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  #16  
Old March 22nd, 2013, 03:29 PM
altiva altiva is offline
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Today is a holiday in Ukraine. It's called "Forty sainted martyrs".
It's dedicated to the Holy Forty Martyrs of Sebastia.
Forty saint martyrs were forty Christian warriors. They served in the
army under Roman emperor Licinius. They were killed because they
refused to perform Roman pagan rituals.
But, in fact, it's a very old Ukrainian holiday, which comes from the
pre-Christian times. When Ukraine was christened,the church tried to
incorporate the old pagan holidays into Christian rituals.
This day, people asked the spring to come, and
to come quickly. They sang special songs, and danced.
They also made buns or cookies, shaped like birds. They took the
pastry outside, and paraded it throughout. People believed, back
then, that the spring came on the wings of the birds. So, they
reasoned: if we showed the baked birds outside, the real birds would see
it and they would bring the spring quicker.
After the ritual, children were given these cookies to play with, and
eventually, to eat.
"Forty" is pronounced "sorok" in Ukrainian language. It sounds similar to
the word "magpie". So, the holiday is called also "magpies". Also, "larks", "birds",
"little storks".
It's a holiday about the birds, after all.


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  #17  
Old March 31st, 2013, 09:14 AM
altiva altiva is offline
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Happy Easter, people. Here are some pyskany for you.
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  #18  
Old April 1st, 2013, 04:48 PM
number5 number5 is offline
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Nalysnyky with raspberries looks very tasty !
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  #19  
Old May 4th, 2013, 08:29 PM
Velvetwater Velvetwater is online now
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I can't add much more than already said apart from perogi being divine, esp in
a good broth.


Also, make sure you munch on lots of cheese and cured meats as they are of a better quality in these parts.
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