Go Back   Cruise Critic Message Board Forums > Cruise Conversations > Cruise Foodies
 
Register here!
Forgot Your Password?


Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old March 7th, 2011, 05:51 PM
piscesgal223 piscesgal223 is offline
Cool Cruiser
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 635
Lightbulb Cruising during Lent

Being the good Catholic I am, I usually give something up for Lent. This year,however, Lent starts right before(actually 2 days from now!) my cruise.

Because of all the good food on the cruise, I am not going to give up sweets(I've been on a cruise before..I know the food-desserts especially-are not to be missed!). At the very least,I am going to do meatless Friday when I am on the cruise.
Reply With Quote

  #2  
Old March 7th, 2011, 06:53 PM
Cruising Golfer's Avatar
Cruising Golfer Cruising Golfer is offline
Cool Cruiser
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 1,025
Default Lent

If you are doing meatless Friday's, you are already giving up something for lent... My DW gives up smoking, no matter what. If you feel you still must give up something else, maybe coffee. You could save a bunch and give up shopping. I don't think the Lord will mind if you just give up meat on Friday!
Enjoy your cruise and Good Luck...C.G.
Reply With Quote

  #3  
Old March 7th, 2011, 06:56 PM
piscesgal223 piscesgal223 is offline
Cool Cruiser
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 635
Default

Coffee would be a tricky one..I've gone maybe a few days without coffee and felt the effects. Luckily,I'm not a soda drinker for the most part(which is a good thing, seeing as how they charge for it on cruises),otherwise I'd do that.

Last edited by piscesgal223; March 7th, 2011 at 06:57 PM.
Reply With Quote

  #4  
Old March 9th, 2011, 04:02 PM
debdiva debdiva is offline
Cool Cruiser
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Denver
Posts: 58
Default Don't give up, take on

As I understand it, it is not necessary to give up something for Lent. Rather, it is to take on a discipline for Lent. I have sometimes read the New Testament in Latin or done an online retreat on forgiveness.
__________________
Reply With Quote

  #5  
Old January 19th, 2013, 07:05 PM
cruztravelr cruztravelr is offline
Cool Cruiser
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: delaware
Posts: 8
Default Would you cruise during Lent?

DH and are are new empty-nesters. Thought we'd take advantage of a low-cost ship from a nearby port as a romantic get-a-way. Since September, we've been trying to find a convenient time and good price. Finally, we found in February the almost perfect cruise. We'll be cruising on Valentines Day. I thought that Ash Wednesday was a week later than it is.

I already don't eat meat, so diet changes are just eating less, and more meager when in Lent. Thought to read "The Devout Life" and more prayer. Will be in port for ashes--I usually go to the services.

I am seriously reconsidering booking. What would you do?
Reply With Quote

  #6  
Old March 9th, 2013, 11:28 AM
DonnaK's Avatar
DonnaK DonnaK is offline
10,000+ Club
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 13,561
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by debdiva View Post
As I understand it, it is not necessary to give up something for Lent. Rather, it is to take on a discipline for Lent. I have sometimes read the New Testament in Latin or done an online retreat on forgiveness.

I am a catechist in the Catholic Church, and this is what we are advised by our diocese to teach the children/teens.

Lenten sacrifice doesn't have to involve food at all (aside from meatless Fridays). You can give up a behavior, like selfishness, impatience or holding grudges. Or, you can take on an additional activity, such as attending daily Mass or going out of your way to do random acts of kindness each day. This year, I gave up complaining. Last year, I gave up gossiping (or talking about other people). The year before, I did two random acts of kindness each day.

Perhaps after 6 weeks of these behavior modifications that started out as Lenten sacrifices, they will become good habits that we continue to incorporate into our everyday lives.
__________________
~Donna

119 nights at sea (61 with RCI):
RCCL Quantum of the Seas (3 day inaugural sampler cruise to nowhere) 11/18/14
Celebrity Summit (7 nights NJ to Bermuda) 8/17/14
Celebrity Summit (7 nights NJ to Bermuda) 8/25/13
RCCL Jewel of the Seas (7 days Southern - Barbados route) 5/25/13
RCCL Explorer of the Seas (9 days NJ to Bermuda, Labadee, San Juan and St Maarten) 5/24/12
RCCL Explorer of the Seas (NJ to Bahamas - New Years cruise) 12/30/11
RCCL Allure of the Seas (Eastern Caribbean) 8/21/11
Caribbean Princess (9 days NY to Bermuda, St Thomas, San Juan and Grand Turk) 7/29/10 REVIEW
Caribbean Princess (Canada/New England) 8/24/08 REVIEW
RCCL Mariner of the Seas (Western Caribbean) 8/26/07 REVIEW
RCCL Mariner of the Seas (Eastern Caribbean) 8/20/06
Carnival Miracle (NY to Bahamas) 6/26/04 REVIEW
RCCL Adventure of the Seas (Southern - Aruba route) 8/24/03
RCCL Explorer of the Seas (Western Caribbean) 8/17/02
Costa Riviera (Western Caribbean) 5/90
Cunard Countess (Southern Caribbean) 6/89
Home Lines Atlantic (NY to Bermuda) 7/88

Last edited by DonnaK; March 9th, 2013 at 11:33 AM.
Reply With Quote

  #7  
Old March 31st, 2013, 05:20 PM
altiva altiva is offline
Cool Cruiser
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 684
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonnaK View Post
I am a catechist in the Catholic Church, and this is what we are advised by our diocese to teach the children/teens.

Lenten sacrifice doesn't have to involve food at all (aside from meatless Fridays). You can give up a behavior, like selfishness, impatience or holding grudges. Or, you can take on an additional activity, such as attending daily Mass or going out of your way to do random acts of kindness each day. This year, I gave up complaining. Last year, I gave up gossiping (or talking about other people). The year before, I did two random acts of kindness each day.

Perhaps after 6 weeks of these behavior modifications that started out as Lenten sacrifices, they will become good habits that we continue to incorporate into our everyday lives.
Doesn't this attitude promote the sin of gluttony? Seeking an easy way, just live as you used to, eat whatever, maybe help an old woman to cross the road? Gluttony is a deadly sin and Lent is the strict fast. I am suprised that they don't offer people fast dishes. All the restaurants in my country do.
Fast is good for your soul as well as your body - it cleanses the bad toxins and improves your health. No meat, diary, no alcohol and smoking.
Though I am late with this, because Easter arrived!
Reply With Quote

  #8  
Old May 3rd, 2013, 11:20 AM
DonnaK's Avatar
DonnaK DonnaK is offline
10,000+ Club
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 13,561
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by altiva View Post
Doesn't this attitude promote the sin of gluttony? Seeking an easy way, just live as you used to, eat whatever, maybe help an old woman to cross the road? Gluttony is a deadly sin and Lent is the strict fast. I am suprised that they don't offer people fast dishes. All the restaurants in my country do.
Fast is good for your soul as well as your body - it cleanses the bad toxins and improves your health. No meat, diary, no alcohol and smoking.
Though I am late with this, because Easter arrived!
It's really a stretch to say that teaching that Lenten sacrifices doesn't always have to involve food, and that it can involve some other behavior modification, promotes gluttony.

Using your logic, fasting from food during Lent would then promote other deadly sins such as laziness (sloth) or envy or greed or pride. Ridiculous, isn't it? If I choice to give up being selfish or lazy rather than giving up food, how is that not also worthy of Lent? Why is choosing to focus on one sin (gluttony) better than focusing on another?

Fasting is only an obligation in our religion on Ash Wednesday and on Good Friday, and not throughout Lent. Yes, fasting is good for the soul/health, however giving people a choice of fasting from various foods, or fasting from various behaviors, is not seeking an easy way. It is often harder to give up a behavior than a particular food item, making it more of a sacrifice.

I did say in my original post that we still give up eating meat on Friday, which is a Lenten obligation regardless of whatever else one decides to sacrifice for Lent.
__________________
~Donna

119 nights at sea (61 with RCI):
RCCL Quantum of the Seas (3 day inaugural sampler cruise to nowhere) 11/18/14
Celebrity Summit (7 nights NJ to Bermuda) 8/17/14
Celebrity Summit (7 nights NJ to Bermuda) 8/25/13
RCCL Jewel of the Seas (7 days Southern - Barbados route) 5/25/13
RCCL Explorer of the Seas (9 days NJ to Bermuda, Labadee, San Juan and St Maarten) 5/24/12
RCCL Explorer of the Seas (NJ to Bahamas - New Years cruise) 12/30/11
RCCL Allure of the Seas (Eastern Caribbean) 8/21/11
Caribbean Princess (9 days NY to Bermuda, St Thomas, San Juan and Grand Turk) 7/29/10 REVIEW
Caribbean Princess (Canada/New England) 8/24/08 REVIEW
RCCL Mariner of the Seas (Western Caribbean) 8/26/07 REVIEW
RCCL Mariner of the Seas (Eastern Caribbean) 8/20/06
Carnival Miracle (NY to Bahamas) 6/26/04 REVIEW
RCCL Adventure of the Seas (Southern - Aruba route) 8/24/03
RCCL Explorer of the Seas (Western Caribbean) 8/17/02
Costa Riviera (Western Caribbean) 5/90
Cunard Countess (Southern Caribbean) 6/89
Home Lines Atlantic (NY to Bermuda) 7/88
Reply With Quote

  #9  
Old June 12th, 2013, 04:04 PM
altiva altiva is offline
Cool Cruiser
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 684
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonnaK View Post
It's really a stretch to say that teaching that Lenten sacrifices doesn't always have to involve food, and that it can involve some other behavior modification, promotes gluttony.

Using your logic, fasting from food during Lent would then promote other deadly sins such as laziness (sloth) or envy or greed or pride. Ridiculous, isn't it? If I choice to give up being selfish or lazy rather than giving up food, how is that not also worthy of Lent? Why is choosing to focus on one sin (gluttony) better than focusing on another?

Fasting is only an obligation in our religion on Ash Wednesday and on Good Friday, and not throughout Lent. Yes, fasting is good for the soul/health, however giving people a choice of fasting from various foods, or fasting from various behaviors, is not seeking an easy way. It is often harder to give up a behavior than a particular food item, making it more of a sacrifice.

I did say in my original post that we still give up eating meat on Friday, which is a Lenten obligation regardless of whatever else one decides to sacrifice for Lent.
I am not sure how not eating meat produces laziness, unless you chase and kill the poor animals yourself. As for the rest, once you restrict your flesh, good things come to your mind, and not pride. As for greed and envy, do you realy feel envy towards non-believers? What kind of envy? After all, you should believe that you will be saved, and they will be damned.
If giving up meat as easy as you decribe, why didn't you do it?
Reply With Quote

Reply

Bookmarks


Ad Sponsored By
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:50 AM.


© 1995 - 2014, The Independent Traveler, Inc. All rights reserved.
"A Community of People Who Love To Cruise"
All of the information contained within Cruise Critic is protected by copyright. You may, however, download a single copy only for your personal use.