A silly food question

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#21
Lancashier
197 Posts
Joined Feb 2013
Originally posted by ToadOfToadHall
That's it.

And it will be deep fried in breadcrumbs or a light batter.
Approx 2/3 years ago we did aT/A plus the east coast of American, one port of call (cannot remember the name) only a small town, and we found a pub which even had a dart board, and served food, we waited quite a while for a table, I ordered Scampi and Chips, the scampi cooked in batter, so much better than the breaded version, and I could not believe how many scampi they gave me, my wife had to help me clear the plate. In pubs in England they always appear to be done with breadcrumbs unfortunately.
#22
4,065 Posts
Joined Nov 2004
This thread reminds me the first time I was in London as a kid my parents asked me late one night if I wanted a biscuit. I vividly remember staring at them and asking why on earth would I want a biscuit at night without any jam or with any other meal?

When my mom handed me a cookie, I was floored.
#23
Chicago
132 Posts
Joined Jun 2017
Originally posted by Solent Richard
Good morning Lanky Lad.

There's another anomaly between us Brits and our amazing 'American Cousins'.

Their shrimps are really our Prawns.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...english/shrimp
It's more complicated than that: Your prawns are either called prawns or "jumbo shrimp" in the US, except in the Carolinas, where a "jumbo shrimp" is so large, a single shrimp is served as an entree, and they're also so large, they're very difficult to cook.
#24
Chicago
132 Posts
Joined Jun 2017
Originally posted by sppunk
This thread reminds me the first time I was in London as a kid my parents asked me late one night if I wanted a biscuit. I vividly remember staring at them and asking why on earth would I want a biscuit at night without any jam or with any other meal?

When my mom handed me a cookie, I was floored.
I've heard that every child who is born in Britain and moves to the US after starting school has the experience of asking their teacher for a "rubber" and being laughed at by the rest of the class.
#25
2,744 Posts
Joined Mar 2005
Originally posted by Solent Richard
Generally recognised as 'Pub' food in the UK surely.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...nt-asked-.html
Yes it is, that's actually how I introduced the wife to it, we were on a family trip to Ireland in 2012, we were staying near Donegal , IRE (Lough Eske to be exact) and we stopped for lunch at a pub, the rest of the family being American ordered a burger, me being the sole Brit knew this was a mistake (I love British/Irish food, but they have no idea how to make a good burger...Sorry) so I ordered the scampi, this raised some eyebrows in the group as they figured it would be the American version.

As the food was delivered they of course were surprised not to see the American version, this soon turned into my father in law asking for a sample....Which in turn turned into 8 orders of scampi being placed.....

Originally posted by ToadOfToadHall
In pubs, only females eat scampi. That's why a mate of mine refers to it as "Ladies Scampi" !
Really ? Hmmm, I had no idea.

Originally posted by sppunk
.

Yes, when I first moved here I had to adapt some of my phrases, thankfully I managed to figure out the "bad" translations pretty quickly.
#26
Chicago
132 Posts
Joined Jun 2017
Our five-year-old niece was born in England to an American mother and a Norwegian father and insists there's a difference between a "cookie" and a "biscuit." Cookies have chips, biscuits do not.
#28
USA
2,013 Posts
Joined May 2011
Originally posted by abefroman329
I've heard that every child who is born in Britain and moves to the US after starting school has the experience of asking their teacher for a "rubber" and being laughed at by the rest of the class.
I was mentoring a Fulbright exchange teacher fron the U.K. many years ago. This female teacher ordered a "box of rubbers" for her classroom from the one in charge of teacher supplies. The male who was in charge of distributing supplies asked "Why in the world would you ask me for that?" It was eventually worked out and we all had a good laugh. Katherine
#29
Chester, UK
1,274 Posts
Joined Apr 2011
When I was at school all those years ago we had an American exchange teacher with one from our school. The two stories we were told:

a) The American teacher shouting at a child in my school to "Stop running in the corridor, otherwise you will fall on your fanny" and having to be taken aside and have that word explained to him !

b) The English teacher saying "Cherrio" to his US class at the end of lesson and the pupils looking highly bemused !
#30
Chicago
132 Posts
Joined Jun 2017
Originally posted by Lady Hudson
I was mentoring a Fulbright exchange teacher fron the U.K. many years ago. This female teacher ordered a "box of rubbers" for her classroom from the one in charge of teacher supplies. The male who was in charge of distributing supplies asked "Why in the world would you ask me for that?" It was eventually worked out and we all had a good laugh. Katherine
And now I'm remembering the commercial on American television from about 25 years ago featuring an English bellhop who got in trouble for asking an American guest at the hotel if she wanted him to knock her up in the morning.
#31
Chicago
132 Posts
Joined Jun 2017
Originally posted by ToadOfToadHall
a) The American teacher shouting at a child in my school to "Stop running in the corridor, otherwise you will fall on your fanny" and having to be taken aside and have that word explained to him !
Well if it was a female student, he wasn't wrong, was he?