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-   -   Is 19 considered a minor? (https://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2571172)

uwhusky78 December 5th, 2017 12:47 PM

Is 19 considered a minor?
 
My daughter is 19 and was invited to go on a cruise with her grandparents and family. However, when grandma tried to check her in online, she got a "Traveling with a Minor" popup and it says she'll require a notarized letter signed by the child's parents.

Why is 19 considered a minor/child? If this letter is truly required, does someone have a template or example I can use? Thank you!

Keith1010 December 5th, 2017 01:31 PM

I am surprised about 19.

I would contact the cruise line.

Here is an example:

http://seauonboard.com/Parental%20Authorization.htm

Keith

Velvetwater December 5th, 2017 01:33 PM

Here are the regulations for all cruise lines as you did not say which line she will be on. Most consider under 21 a minor under maritime law around US waters. This changes to under 18 in most other parts of the world.

https://cruises.affordabletours.com/...eRequirements/

Kamloops50 December 5th, 2017 01:34 PM

In North America most cruise lines consider anyone under the age of 21 a minor. In Europe the
age is 19 or younger as a minor.

Keith1010 December 5th, 2017 01:40 PM

I meant to have also welcomed you to Cruise Critic when I responded earlier.

Keith

uwhusky78 December 5th, 2017 02:09 PM

Hi, thanks for the replies. Sorry, I had meant to put a little more info in the original post. They will be on Royal Caribbean... this was surprising because we were in the Bahamas a few years ago and I thought the legal drinking/gambling age was 18, so I didn't think there would be any issue with my 19 y/o going along. Guess it's different due to the maritime law. Thanks again everyone.

Aquahound December 5th, 2017 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uwhusky78 (Post 54699525)
Guess it's different due to the maritime law.

I'm not aware of any maritime law identifying 19 year olds as minors. I'm not sure where Velvetwater got that.

These age restrictions and guidelines are mostly created for liability purposes.

paul929207 December 5th, 2017 02:18 PM

When ashore, your daughter would be under the local laws. While on the ship, their rules apply. So it may be that she can drink and gamble in some or all the ports, but not on the ship.

easyboy December 5th, 2017 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uwhusky78 (Post 54699525)
Hi, thanks for the replies. Sorry, I had meant to put a little more info in the original post. They will be on Royal Caribbean... this was surprising because we were in the Bahamas a few years ago and I thought the legal drinking/gambling age was 18, so I didn't think there would be any issue with my 19 y/o going along. Guess it's different due to the maritime law. Thanks again everyone.

You may be right. It could depend on ports of itinerary.


Sent from my iPhone using Forums

zqvol December 5th, 2017 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uwhusky78 (Post 54698936)
My daughter is 19 and was invited to go on a cruise with her grandparents and family. However, when grandma tried to check her in online, she got a "Traveling with a Minor" popup and it says she'll require a notarized letter signed by the child's parents.

Why is 19 considered a minor/child? If this letter is truly required, does someone have a template or example I can use? Thank you!

Technically she is not a minor and does not need a letter in spite of what the cruise line pop up says, in fact a letter has no effect at all. Instead of arguing the point, just get her parents to write a letter saying she has permission to leave the country. Nothing formal is needed.


People often confuse the age when one is no longer a minor with the legal drinking age, they are not the same in the US. In the US anyone 18 or over is considered an adult for legal purposes, but they are not of legal drinking age until they are 21. This means that they can vote, sign a binding contract to buy a house or a car, or get a credit card, but they cannot drink alcohol.

In most places in the Caribbean the legal drinking age is 18 or lower, so while a person might not be able to drink on the ship they can legally drink ashore.


Good luck keeping track of it all!

sail7seas December 5th, 2017 04:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zqvol (Post 54700206)
Technically she is not a minor and does not need a letter in spite of what the cruise line pop up says, in fact a letter has no effect at all. Instead of arguing the point, just get her parents to write a letter saying she has permission to leave the country. Nothing formal is needed.


People often confuse the age when one is no longer a minor with the legal drinking age, they are not the same in the US. In the US anyone 18 or over is considered an adult for legal purposes, but they are not of legal drinking age until they are 21. This means that they can vote, sign a binding contract to buy a house or a car, or get a credit card, but they cannot drink alcohol.

In most places in the Caribbean the legal drinking age is 18 or lower, so while a person might not be able to drink on the ship they can legally drink ashore.


Good luck keeping track of it all!

Can a 19 year old enlist in the U.S. Military without parent's approval?



If a 19 year old is not a full time student, does a non- cusstodial parent's court ordered child support obligation end?

Shorex December 5th, 2017 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sail7seas (Post 54700346)
Can a 19 year old enlist in the U.S. Military without parent's approval?

If a 19 year old is not a full time student, does a non- cusstodial parent's court ordered child support obligation end?

In general, even an 18 year old can enlist in the military without parental approval. Perhaps even younger if emancipation has occurred. The is easily googled from many official sources.

Your second question is best answered by a family law attorney in the relevant state and having access to all the relevant documents. I would give zero weight to responses from strangers on a cruise board (yes, a random response might be correct, but should you rely on it? No. Blind squirrels, etc.)

Krazy Kruizers December 5th, 2017 05:03 PM

Welcome to Cruise Critic.


You should call RCI to get their ruling if they consider a 19 year old a minor.

chengkp75 December 5th, 2017 05:22 PM

RCI clearly states in their ticket contract that anyone over 18 is not a minor. It also states that 21 is the drinking age (does not say anything about "minors" drinking, just states the age). It may be that they are trying to book the 19 year old in a cabin by themselves, that is not adjacent to the grandparent's cabin, and even booking in an adjacent cabin requires a "guardian" for a passenger under 21.

navybankerteacher December 5th, 2017 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sail7seas (Post 54700346)
Can a 19 year old enlist in the U.S. Military without parent's approval?



If a 19 year old is not a full time student, does a non- cusstodial parent's court ordered child support obligation end?

Depends upon the state- under Connecticut divorce law there is no presumed parental obligation to pay child support after age 18.

sail7seas December 5th, 2017 06:55 PM

Thanks for the answers to my questions. ;)

cb at sea December 5th, 2017 08:04 PM

Cruise ships don't allow 19 year olds to do anything on their own. Many require you to be 25 to sail alone, unless you're married....stupid rules.
18 is considered ADULT for signing legal documents...yet you can't drink on a cruise (depending on cruise line and destination) without permission..and sometimes, even permission isn't enough.

zqvol December 5th, 2017 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sail7seas (Post 54700346)
Can a 19 year old enlist in the U.S. Military without parent's approval?



If a 19 year old is not a full time student, does a non- cusstodial parent's court ordered child support obligation end?

An 18 year old can enlist in the military without anyone's permission. It is impossible to answer your second question because often divorce degrees create contractual obligations that have nothing to do with the dependent's age. Those rules also vary from state to state but absent a court order generally child support obligations end on a child's 18th birthday even if they are in school.


Please note this is not legal advice and should not be considered as such.

leaveitallbehind December 5th, 2017 08:50 PM

Specific to RCI and to consuming alcohol, any US based itinerary restricts that to 21 on board. European, Asian, Australian, and South American based itineraries allows this at age 18. In any port of call the guidelines there dictate the age of consumption while off the ship and in port.

Nebr.cruiser December 5th, 2017 09:43 PM

When we sailed RCI with grandchildren (they were under 18 though), Royal Caribbean had a form for parental permission on their site available for download. You can also google 'parental permission form for cruises' or something similar and print one off.

The RCI form and probably others did need to be notarized.

The 18-21 age group is really in a warp when cruising; too old for the teen club, too young to do most 'adult' things.


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