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kaymoz

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About kaymoz

  • Rank
    Cool Cruiser

About Me

  • Location
    Virginia
  • Interests
    travel
  • Favorite Cruise Line(s)
    who knows! still trying them all....
  • Favorite Cruise Destination Or Port of Call
    who knows -- still exploring!

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  1. It's the nature of scientific inquiry while exploring "the unknown" that different people ("experts") will have different theories, while the details are getting flushed out. And even tho eventually a consensus about the "truth" may eventually be reached, it can always be revised when more/better information comes along. I know it's hard to accept what can seem like waffling, especially when it's a really serious matter, and people like certainty. Think about the days of the European explorers who sailed into uncharted waters based on differing theories about how the earth was configured &
  2. Thanks for posting this well-written summary which provides lots of insights. It's super relevant to me right now since we leave for Iceland ourselves in one week to do a circumnavigation cruise! But not with Viking. We'll sail on the much smaller Ocean Diamond (<200 passengers) with Iceland ProCruises. So I expect they will have their own learning/experience curve with the local authorities as covid protocols are worked out across the nation.
  3. Yes -- here the utube video I mentioned: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUXwd1PB_zk
  4. A passenger from one of the Viking cruises that experienced covid-related disruptions (Jupiter) posted a youtube video while the ship was in Akureyri commenting that the local authorities had questioned the ship's "covid protocols." I wondered what that meant, since I was under the impression that the testing that Viking was doing was not required. Does anyone have more info about these "protocol" concerns?
  5. We had arranged our own tourist visas, as I mentioned in my earlier comment, so we could move freely while we were at the portstop in St. Petersburg. We did this long before we left the US, and there was a detailed application required, with fees, plus we had to make our passports available so the visa could be added onto a page therein. I probably would not have bothered if we'd only had two days, but we had three full days, and this wasn't my first visit PLUS we were planning a later cruise around the northern part of Norway that we thought might include a stop in Russia.
  6. I did alot of research before selecting a Baltic cruise. It turns out that for St. Petersburg and some other ports included in many cruises in that part of the world, there is an old city port in the middle of everything that the smaller cruise ships can use and a newer port (often very far away from the tourist action!) where the larger ships must go, since they are generally too big for the old ports. (I think someone has alluded to this earlier in this thread, tho I confess I didn't read all replies!) When the big ship parks far away, you have to spend alot of your limited time in port
  7. We did a Baltic cruise in 2018 on Oceania Nautica which was totally delightful and I look forward to sailing with them again. This trip was two weeks overall, with three days in Saint Petersburg where the ship docked within walking distance of the Hermitage, which was super convenient. We obtained our own visas for Russia in advance, which was a bit of hassle and expense, but we wanted to truly be independent with our time rather than having to stick with a tour guide/minder guide and their schedule for everything. This gave us the freedom to linger in areas of the Hermitage that were mean
  8. Another alternative is Iceland Procruises. We booked with them for a Circumnavigation of the island this summer, which will allow us to visit ten different places around Iceland without the hassles of driving. We appreciate that it's a small ship, <200 passengers. Right now they have some special offers -- great prices with free airfare on certain sailings.
  9. Another option for visiting Iceland and Greenland by ship is with Iceland ProCruises. Their plan for this summer would allow you do do a ten day circumnavigation of Iceland coupled with an extensive loop to and around the coast of Greenland (29 July - 18 August, for example) on a small ship (<200 passenger) . We've booked the Iceland portion.
  10. We've booked pre-cruise lodging within walking distance of the port a few times. Southampton for one. What a thrilling way to begin any cruise!
  11. Wow! I am surprised so many have responded so heavily in favor of land travel BEFORE the cruise, and that the common sentiment seems to be 'when the cruise is done, I'm ready to go home.' That's what our TA said too! I have to confess at the end of a cruise, I usually feel like I just want to stay on. Now that I'm retired, I feel no compulsion to rush back home! We've typically extended after cruising, but in retrospect that was largely because of port locations. But the trip we are planning now is a circumnavigation of Iceland in 10 days, beginning and ending at the same por
  12. When you add land-based travel to a cruise, and it's all in the same country, do you prefer to do it: Before sailing, After the end of the cruise, It depends (on what?)
  13. Yes, agree that there are multiple lists of foods limits for a low oxalate diet. But when not cooking at home, the trick is knowing which specific ingredients others have included, which isn't always obvious by looking at a dish on the buffet or by reading menu descriptions. For example, is the soup made with a vegetable stock that includes spinach (one of the bad boys for oxalates)? Just wondered if anyone has "been there" on this issue!
  14. Many cruise lines will specifically accommodate low-salt or gluten free diets, but what about the low oxalate diet? Has anyone found any ships adapting for oxalate content? [This kind of diet is often prescribed for those who have had (or want to prevent) kidney stones. Oxalates are fairly common in plants, so there are some foods ingredients derived from plants that contain high enough levels of oxalates that they should be avoided completely by some.]
  15. Many cruise lines will specifically accommodate low-salt or gluten free diets, but what about the low oxalate diet? Has anyone found any ships adapting for oxalate content? [This kind of diet is often prescribed for those who have had (or want to prevent LOL!) kidney stones. Oxalates are fairly common in plants, so there are some foods ingredients derived from plants that contain high enough levels of oxalates that they should be avoided completely by some.]
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