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cvgrammy

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About cvgrammy

  • Rank
    Cool Cruiser

About Me

  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    Travel
  • Favorite Cruise Line(s)
    Viking
  • Favorite Cruise Destination Or Port of Call
    Bergen, Norway

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  1. Yes, we do the very same thing KBourgeois! Actually, we have booked on our own twice (found cheaper air and routes) and this time, booked through Viking and then waited a few days to clear and booked and paid for our upgrade. Hope that helps.
  2. Anyone know anything about cabin #4048?
  3. Well several on this string don’t leave for months...we leave on our cruise in 20 days! We disembark in Hong Kong. We’ve been told by Viking “management knows about the situation and are discussing the options.” We aren’t worried; we just want to know before we leave as we have hotel reservations to extend in Hong Kong.
  4. We are only weeks away from our cruise...we leave early Sept. on Viking from Tokyo to Hong Kong. No notice from Viking yet. We are making an educated guess that Viking will change and we'll disembark in Taipei instead. Canade, Australia and US have all raised the level of warning to travel to Hong Kong.
  5. cvgrammy

    HONG KONG

    Boatharbour, We are seasoned travelers and certainly won't put ourselves at risk! Thank you for your comments! Yes, things are certainly getting heated up over there. I don't get ANY information from Viking. In fact, the guy I spoke to had NO CLUE as to anything going on in Hong Kong! We also know they are given "canned answers" to give to clients. We booked our air through Viking this time and know they will have to deal with getting us home...we aren't worried about that. We are "supposed" to go to Taipei, then a day at sea, then two nights in Hong Kong. We kinda think that if things don't change dramatically, the ship will dock in Taipei and just stay there. I don't think they'll shorten the trip due to having to give refunds.
  6. We did the Baltic Sea cruise in May 2018. Am I reading correctly that they are still doing the same shows of Beatles and Abba? We leave on another cruise in Sept. and hoping it's not the same show 1 1/2 years later!
  7. We were in 6091 and loved the room. Only once or twice did we hear them move furniture on the outside deck but it wasn't at night or early morning.
  8. cvgrammy

    HONG KONG

    We got a great rate at the hotel. I checked today and prices have increased. Glad we made reservations when we did. i'll continue to check!
  9. cvgrammy

    HONG KONG

    We are arriving (end of cruise) in Hong Kong towards the end of September. We are staying at the New Millennium Hotel. I stayed there about 10 years ago (different name). It was a great location! We are watching HK news for updates and hoping things calm down sooner than later. I will also check to see if rates have come down since we booked!
  10. Liz Masterson, repost anywhere you would like to! I love researching our destinations.
  11. We went to Bergen a title over a year ago. Darling town! Bergen, known as the "Gateway to the Fjords," is Norway's second-largest city. We traveld in May and had warm beautiful weather...NO rain! woo hoo! We came in one day before we were to board the ship. Stayed at: Thon Hotel Bergen Brygge (walked to the ship) By the time we got to the hotel we were tired but walked to the wharf and had a fantastic shrimp lunch/dinner outside with a cold beer. We then walked a couple of blocks and went straight to the Funicular (we were told if it is sunny it is a must do as not sunny often) SPECTACULAR! Just sat and looked at the extraordinary view! Very relaxing, took pictures. Woke up, ate breakfast and did "my walk". Perfect! Went back, got luggage and boarded ship. Top things to see: 1. Mount Floyen & the Funicular (Floibanen): Go before cruise ship tours as the cruise ship groups cut to the front of the line. If the line between the lake and Fish Market were the base of an isosceles triangle, at the apex of the triangle would be the station for the Floibanen Funicular, which climbs more than 1,000 feet to the peak of Mt. Floyen. Magnificent views of Bergen and the other six mountains that frame the city, as well as the fjords beyond. Don’t go when the weather turns bad or rains as not much to see! 2. Bryggen Hanseatic Wharf: walk & wander through the wharf and down its historic, wooden alleys. 3. Fish Market: in Bergen is one of Norway's most visited outdoors markets. The Fish Market sells seafood, fruit and vegetables. Open: 8:00- 23:00 Where You're Docked: The cruise port is within walking distance of Bryggen and Bergen Town Centre. Good to Know: It rains quite a bit in Bergen, and it can be especially chilly by the water, so be sure to pack layers. Shopping: Everything is expensive! Wool sweaters, troll dolls, contemporary tableware, silver and ceramics. These can easily be found in Bryggen (historic wharf area) and in the cross streets running southwest perpendicular to Olav Kyrres Gate. For true quality two stores: OLEANA: STRANDKAIEN 2A BRYGGEN; The flagship store of this famous Norwegian design shop is full of gorgeous, colorful wool sweaters. BERLE BRYGGEN: BRYGGEN 5 BRYGGEN; This clothing and souvenir store stocks the complete Dale of Norway collection of sweaters and cardigans, as well as trolls, pewter, down duvets, and other traditional knitwear and souvenir items. My Walking Tour: Historic Bergen Start: The Fish Market. Finish: West Norwegian Museum of Decorative Arts. Time: 1 hour 1. Fish Market: From here, walk west along the Strandkaien, hugging the harborfront on your right side, making a small detour inland at the Strandkaien's end. Within a block, at an angular jog in the avenue known as the Strandgaten, you'll see the solid, partially fortified walls of: 2. City Wall Gate: This gate was originally built in 1550 as a checkpoint in a once-continuous wall that surrounded Bergen. Today it stands isolated amid the newer buildings and broad avenues that surround it on all sides. From here, walk west along Strandgaten, noting the many shops that line the street on either side. Within about 5 minutes you'll reach: 3. Nykirken: Noteworthy features of this church are the Danish-inspired, mansard roof from around 1761, the copper-capped baroque spire, and its location overlooking the entrance to Bergen's harbor. From here, walk steeply uphill for a block along the Nykirkeallmenningen, and turn left onto the narrow confines of the cobble-covered Ytre Markeveien, noting the antique wood-sided houses on either side. Walk 4 short blocks to the Kippersmauet, and then turn left, walking down a steep, cobble-covered alleyway where, at nos. 23 and 24, there was a disastrous fire in 2001. Now retrace your steps uphill back to the Ytre Markeveien, and then turn right onto the big square (Holbergsallmenningen), originally conceived as a firebreak. Cross the wide boulevard (Klosteret) and walk east for 1 short block, turning right (sharply downhill) on the impossibly narrow cobble-covered alleyway identified within a few steps as the: 4. Knøsesmauet: You'll immediately find yourself hemmed in, somewhat claustrophobically, by the antique wooden houses of a district known as the Klosteret. It's composed of compact, impeccably well-maintained wooden houses immediately adjacent to one another. The risk of fire among the brightly painted historic buildings is a much-feared issue. Continue descending the cobble-covered, steeply sloping length of the Knøsesmauet, bypassing brightly painted wooden houses, prefaced, in some cases, with tiny gardens. Cross over the Skottogaten and continue walking downhill. Turn left onto the St. Hansestredet. (Sankt Hanse is the patron saint of the summer solstice, often invoked in midsummer with bouquets of midsummer flowers such as the ones that adorn the sides of the houses along this street.) St. Hansestredet, within 2 short blocks, merges with the busy traffic of the Jonsvollsgaten, a wide commercial boulevard. Walk east for about 3 minutes, cross over the Teatergaten, and continue walking east along Engen, the eastward extension of the Jonsvollsgaten. On your left rises the stately looking, Art Nouveau bulk of the: 5. National Theater: Details to look for inside and out include life-size portrait statues of Bjørnson, author of Norway's national anthem, and Ibsen, who served as the theater's director for 5 years. (The stern and magisterial-looking granite sculpture of Ibsen, completed in 1982 and set into the lawns of the theater's eastern side, was considered so ugly that it remained in storage for many years.) On the theater's tree-shaded western side, just outside the entrance to its lobby, is a flattering likeness, in bronze, of Nordahl Grieg, often referred to as the Norwegian version of Winston Churchill because he warned of the Nazi menace before many of his colleagues in the Norwegian Parliament. If it's open, walk into the theater's lobby, a survivor of a disastrous fire in 1916 and of a Nazi bomb that fell directly into its lobby in 1944. Completely restored in the late 1990s, the lobby has an understated Art Nouveau style and portraits of great Norwegians lining its walls. Now, with your back to the ornamental eastern side of the theater, walk easterly along the: 6. Ole Bulls Plass: Descend the gradual slope and note the grand commercial buildings that rise on either side. Broad and wide and flanked with flower beds, restaurants, bars, and shops, it was originally laid out, in an era when virtually everything that flanked it was made of wood, as a firebreak. Today it's an architectural showcase of Bergen, named after Norway's first musical superstar. Descend along the Ole Bulls Plass, past a violin-playing statue of the musical star himself. When the street opens onto the broad esplanade known as Olav Kyrres Gate, note on the right side the turn-of-the-19th-century brick facade of the: 7. West Norway Museum of Applied Art: The statue of a seated male lost in thought set into a niche on the museum's facade commemorates the 19th-century painter J. C. Dahl. It was crafted by one of Norway's first widely celebrated female sculptors, Ambrosia Tønnesen. The abstract sculpture set onto the lawn in front of the museum, composed of a series of rainbow-colored concentric hoops, is in honor of Bergen-born early-20th-century composer Harald Saeverud.
  12. Peregrina651, I can't post "live" as we went on that cruise a year ago last May. I do a ton of research before a trip and put together a booklet with flight information, excursions, "my walking guides", etc. That way we have it and we toss the paper away after that particular day. Tracy
  13. We went into Bergen a day early. LOVE Bergen! We arrived, checked into hotel (VERY close to cruise ship). Had a late lunch on the wharf. We got up in the morning and did my planned walk: Walking Tour: Historic Bergen Start: The Fish Market. Finish: West Norwegian Museum of Decorative Arts. Time: 1 hour 1. Fish Market: From here, walk west along the Strandkaien, hugging the harborfront on your right side, making a small detour inland at the Strandkaien's end. Within a block, at an angular jog in the avenue known as the Strandgaten, you'll see the solid, partially fortified walls of: 2. City Wall Gate: This gate was originally built in 1550 as a checkpoint in a once-continuous wall that surrounded Bergen. Today it stands isolated amid the newer buildings and broad avenues that surround it on all sides. From here, walk west along Strandgaten, noting the many shops that line the street on either side. Within about 5 minutes you'll reach: 3. Nykirken: Noteworthy features of this church are the Danish-inspired, mansard roof from around 1761, the copper-capped baroque spire, and its location overlooking the entrance to Bergen's harbor. From here, walk steeply uphill for a block along the Nykirkeallmenningen, and turn left onto the narrow confines of the cobble-covered Ytre Markeveien, noting the antique wood-sided houses on either side. Walk 4 short blocks to the Kippersmauet, and then turn left, walking down a steep, cobble-covered alleyway where, at nos. 23 and 24, there was a disastrous fire in 2001. Now retrace your steps uphill back to the Ytre Markeveien, and then turn right onto the big square (Holbergsallmenningen), originally conceived as a firebreak. Cross the wide boulevard (Klosteret) and walk east for 1 short block, turning right (sharply downhill) on the impossibly narrow cobble-covered alleyway identified within a few steps as the: 4. Knøsesmauet: You'll immediately find yourself hemmed in, somewhat claustrophobically, by the antique wooden houses of a district known as the Klosteret. It's composed of compact, impeccably well-maintained wooden houses immediately adjacent to one another. The risk of fire among the brightly painted historic buildings is a much-feared issue. Continue descending the cobble-covered, steeply sloping length of the Knøsesmauet, bypassing brightly painted wooden houses, prefaced, in some cases, with tiny gardens. Cross over the Skottogaten and continue walking downhill. Turn left onto the St. Hansestredet. (Sankt Hanse is the patron saint of the summer solstice, often invoked in midsummer with bouquets of midsummer flowers such as the ones that adorn the sides of the houses along this street.) St. Hansestredet, within 2 short blocks, merges with the busy traffic of the Jonsvollsgaten, a wide commercial boulevard. Walk east for about 3 minutes, cross over the Teatergaten, and continue walking east along Engen, the eastward extension of the Jonsvollsgaten. On your left rises the stately looking, Art Nouveau bulk of the: 5. National Theater: Details to look for inside and out include life-size portrait statues of Bjørnson, author of Norway's national anthem, and Ibsen, who served as the theater's director for 5 years. (The stern and magisterial-looking granite sculpture of Ibsen, completed in 1982 and set into the lawns of the theater's eastern side, was considered so ugly that it remained in storage for many years.) On the theater's tree-shaded western side, just outside the entrance to its lobby, is a flattering likeness, in bronze, of Nordahl Grieg, often referred to as the Norwegian version of Winston Churchill because he warned of the Nazi menace before many of his colleagues in the Norwegian Parliament. If it's open, walk into the theater's lobby, a survivor of a disastrous fire in 1916 and of a Nazi bomb that fell directly into its lobby in 1944. Completely restored in the late 1990s, the lobby has an understated Art Nouveau style and portraits of great Norwegians lining its walls. Now, with your back to the ornamental eastern side of the theater, walk easterly along the: 6. Ole Bulls Plass: Descend the gradual slope and note the grand commercial buildings that rise on either side. Broad and wide and flanked with flower beds, restaurants, bars, and shops, it was originally laid out, in an era when virtually everything that flanked it was made of wood, as a firebreak. Today it's an architectural showcase of Bergen, named after Norway's first musical superstar. Descend along the Ole Bulls Plass, past a violin-playing statue of the musical star himself. When the street opens onto the broad esplanade known as Olav Kyrres Gate, note on the right side the turn-of-the-19th-century brick facade of the: 7. West Norway Museum of Applied Art: The statue of a seated male lost in thought set into a niche on the museum's facade commemorates the 19th-century painter J. C. Dahl. It was crafted by one of Norway's first widely celebrated female sculptors, Ambrosia Tønnesen. The abstract sculpture set onto the lawn in front of the museum, composed of a series of rainbow-colored concentric hoops, is in honor of Bergen-born early-20th-century composer Harald Saeverud.
  14. We too shall just wait and see...I'll check it out once on board. 38 days but who's counting! 🙂
  15. You can do both at the same time. A little circle that you choose both names. We book excursions at the MOMENT they are available as to not get disappointed. We research way in advance.
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