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pingpong1

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Everything posted by pingpong1

  1. Or....Go to Walmart and buy an inflatable pool lounger, pick up a 6-pack of beer, and find the closest creek or pond nearest your house. Inflate the lounger, climb on board with the beer, and float around in the pond. Close your eyes, and pretend you're on a cruise ship. Just think about how much money you've saved!
  2. We're looking forward to our next (this Oct) Regent/Navigator cruise, as well. And we're bringing along some "first-time to Regent" friends with us. "MadMarine" - Like you, Navigator was also our first Regent cruise (2011) as well, and we enjoy the ship very much. My only disappointment was when they eliminated the Connoisseur Club. I always looked forward to that for a fine afternoon cigar, good conversation with fellow cruisers, and a relaxing single-malt. "Rcandkc", do you have any info about what, specifically, they'll be doing during the upcoming June refurb? "Papa" - like you, we like deck 7 - forward, as well (I like to hear the anchor drop!) 😉 We will be in #704. Best Regards to you all.
  3. Wendy - Absolutely right. As you and others have said, no one is forcing any person to book a Regent (or any other "all-inclusive") Cruise Line. So I'm not understanding why (some) people get so seemingly concerned, angry, or zealous (pick your own adjective) about the "included alcohol, excursions, or gratuities" that make up Regent's fare structure? I could say, "I don't eat caviar and my wife doesn't eat fish....so why should we have to subsidize or pay for those things, just so that others can eat it "for free"? Is "included alcohol, caviar, and excursions" a part of Regent's fare structure? Of course. But that doesn't stop many of us from booking Regent Cruises and paying the premium (er....."luxury") prices for that "whole Regent package" and experience, no matter whether we use any one particular included amenity, or not. As others, like Wynterwynd have said, we all have choices. For those who simply don't want to pay for unlimited alcohol, which they won't use, as a "built in component" of their cruise fare, then Oceania seems to be a very satisfactory alternative for them. And many of us on this board actually seem to be choosing both lines, based upon itineraries, ship features, and schedules, and are "crossing between lines", quiet adeptly. Regards.
  4. According to the "fine print" (T&C's) on Regent's website, the "RegentCare Travel Protection Program" is underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company of Columbus, Ohio. I don't think there's much of chance of Nationwide "going under" anytime soon. Apparently, Regent is not a "self-insurer" for their travel protection program. You can get to the info by dropping to the FAQ section at the very bottom of Regent's homepage and then "clicking on" the section for RegentCare Insurance. You then have to specify your state of resident (maybe it's not available for non-U.S residents?). It will then take you to the specific policy and coverage that would apply to you - under the laws of your home state. Like any Insurance policy, you'll see multiple pages of "definitions" and "exclusions". Some might say, "loop holes", that would absolve them from "paying up" for any claim. I didn't read the whole thing but "Exclusion #1" was "pre-existing conditions". I also noted this RegentCare insurance will not be the "first payee" for any claims if you have any other insurance that would provide coverage (like a Chase Sapphire Reserve Card, etc.). RegentCare would only pick up the "difference" (up the limit of their coverage) after any/all other payees possible/conceivable payees you might have "kicked in" first. I would advise anyone to read the tiny details carefully before handing over any money for any travel insurance policy - from any company. As they say, "the devil's in the details". Best Regards
  5. Poss - The (financial) way I thought of it was that DW and I were actually paying for "the full stateroom" and infrastructure costs, and Dad's small additional fare was going towards the additional food and beverages that he was consuming. And even up into his 90's (as an "old retired Navy Man"), Dad could still ably hold up his end of a good bottle of single-malt scotch! The pull-out sofa in the stateroom would have been there anyway, if it had just been the 2 of us, so we felt that the small additional fare being charged by Regent (for Dad) was quite reasonable (and appreciated). On an additional note, Mark Conroy - a true gentleman - personally arranged for that room to be made available for us on very short notice. I still think fondly of Mark and appreciated that kindness very much. Best Regards.
  6. Hi Poss - When my Dad was still alive and cruising with us, he was in his early 90's. I found (and thought) that the Regent-offered cruise insurance for him was quite reasonably priced and the best deal. The premium for him was based solely upon a percentage of the cruise fare paid. And I believe that percentage was 10%. Now, since he was the 3rd person in our room (Dad slept on the "pull out" sofa) his fare, as the 3rd person, was much less than ours was. But at his age, the alternative insurance premium cost (if it were based upon age, as most are) would have been either prohibitive or unobtainable. Look at Regent's premium structure again. You might see, after comparing it to other products, it's not really a bad deal at all compared to the other options. That might not be the case for younger travelers. Regards.
  7. KJ - "Too small" to do "what", exactly? For full disclosure, readers know that I (along with "Wendy" and many others) are "fans" of Navigator - but NOT to the exclusion of the other Regent ships! I won't "talk down" any of the other (Regent) ships just to "talk up" this ship. We'd gladly sail them all (if I didn't run out of money, first)! Yes, Navigator is smaller than the other Regent ships, but it also sails with at least 200 less passengers than the other ships do. I would say (of course, my opinion only) that there's "plenty of room on board", considering the smaller number of passengers she's carrying. Of course, on "bad weather days", more people will be inside in the public areas or in their staterooms - but that also holds true for the other ships, as well! On the "nice days", there's lots of open deck areas to enjoy on Navigator. "Hot Root" is correct that entree selections that are offered/served fleet-wide on the other larger ships are also offered (in Compass Rose or Prime 7) on Navigator. And of course, there's also La Veranda/Sette Mari, and the recently introduced pool deck grill dining option for lunches and evenings, as well (weather permitting). Hypercafe is right - "The trip will be great". Navigator also seems to have some of the lowest per diem/per person fares, along with the largest standard accommodations of any of Regent's other ships. The bathrooms are wonderful and very large, with separate shower stalls and tubs. Hope you have a great time! Best Regards from a "Navigator Fan". (I "second" everything "CWN" just posted) 😉
  8. 1985 - Howdy! Looking back on that sentence of mine, I actually have absolutely no idea or recollection of what the heck I meant (you won't hear that on CC very often)! Of course Riviera is bigger (and wll have more passengers) than Explorer. Passenger load on Riviera is 1250 vs 750 pax on Explorer, as you correctly state. 66K tons for Riviera vs 56K tons for Explorer. 785 ft length (Riviera) vs 735 ft. length (Explorer), and 106' beam (Riviera) vs 102' beam (Explorer). I must have been "thinking" (but didn't say it) that each of those ships are the "newest", largest, and "most lavish" within each of their respective fleets (Regent's Splendor isn't in service yet, but it's virtually identical to Explorer). Having said that, even though the Explorer is 84% of the gross tonnage of Riviera, and is (just) 50 feet shorter than Riviera, it carries 40% fewer passengers. That's a big difference! So Regent's Explorer naturally has a much higher "space ratio" (68) than Riviera's (46). To passengers considering which ship to sail on (if "size matters"), the Explorer will "feel" much larger and "more open" (i.e., spacious) than the Riviera. Thanks for the question and request for clarification.
  9. Gilly, Your quote should be chiseled into granite (or brass) and mounted prominently on a wall in each ship's main reception hall! It's also worthy of being printed at the top of the page of the first issue of "Passages" at the beginning of every cruise. Regards
  10. Hi trulyBlonde - I'm not wishing my comments in any way to be interpreted as being "dismissive" of you or your preferences. In fact a couple of years ago, I think I might have even remarked (on CC) about the 'brown water" (on Navigator) myself. In my own cruising experience on Navigator, I think I saw it once, just like "Wendy" has, and I judged (again, just like Wendy) that it was "no big deal". To me, the "positives" (like lovely bathrooms and huge standard cabins) of cruising on "little Navigator", far outweigh the negatives! Hence, I would still recommend Navigator to my friends. And I do readily admit that sailing on Regent is by no means, "cheap". We each have to judge whether any of these cruises is "good value for the money", and whether they represent the desired "luxury experience" for the price. I ran the water (on that one Navigator cruise) for a minute or two, and "the browness" disappeared. And it happened on just that one cruise. On other ships (both "O" and Regent) I've read reports of "cold soup", "under cooked meat", "tough" lobster, and "slow table service". Those things would actually annoy me far more (than intermittent brown water). But different things disturb different people in different ways. I've been told by one prolific R "cheerleader" that "no cruise is perfect". So in that vain, I still really like the Navigator, as so many others do - but certainly not to the exclusion of trying (and cruising on) different ships and lines. I just feel blessed that I can afford any of them! Best Regards.
  11. Cruise Junky - There is absolutely nothing wrong with the Navigator, whatsoever. For MANY of us who are regular Regent cruisers, the Navigator happens to be (one of) our favorite ships. There is nothing to "not like" about a Regent Cruise - no matter which ship you're on. Some of the offhand comments made on these boards (not just Oceania or Regent) by some posters, tend to be more reactionary than logical. In a recent interview, Regent's CEO said that Navigator was Regent's most profitable ship. It follows from that statement that a lot of people must really like and enjoy sailing on her! I don't know why it is that some (rather opinionated) folks, who just happen to like Chevy's, feel they have to disparage Ford 's (along with Ford owners), in the process? It's similar to hearing that other popular "first-world complaint" - "The champagne served with the Sunday brunch was not up to par"! Don't for a moment question or second-guess your decision to book a Navigator Cruise. You'll have a great time, if you allow yourself to do so! Many of us happen to love that "little ship", and keep returning to it, over and over again. And we can love the Navigator without "criticizing" the Explorer, Voyager, Riviera, or Marina. The food, service, staff, and amenities are all wonderful. Generally, I think that if there's people who don't happen to like a particular Oceania or Regent cruise/ship, than that issue is on "them", and not the particular ship. Regards.
  12. AK - Very interesting numbers. Thanks for sharing. I'm a past "Regent Guy" (but by no means, a "cheerleader") who is now going to try Oceania, for the first time. I'm not going in as a "test", or as a comparison, or with any pre-conceived notions. I've also got more future Regent's booked, as well. But from everything I've read on this board, it sounds like O is going to "suit/suite me" just fine and be a very good experience! I look forward to any/all cruises that I'm still fortunate enough to be able to take. Regards.
  13. bbtondo and buggins - I think you're both absolutely right! I would (and do, in fact) do exactly the same thing as you have decided to do. I have a friend who "goes nuts & drives himself crazy" over pricing this stuff (airfares, hotels, etc.) and is constantly trying to "game the system". And for him (retired with $1M+ in his IRA), it is completely and totally unnecessary - he could pay whatever the cost was....for FC and BC...and not even "break a sweat"! But for him (and others) it has gone well beyond the hobby stage, or "simply trying to save a few dollars", and he has dived headlong down the rabbit-hole and into a full-blown obsession. It would drive him "crazy" to buy his plane tickets and then 2 months later, find out that he could have possibly "saved himself" a couple hundred dollars. Life's just too short to worry about that stuff (at least in my estimation). I've told him several times that if a "few hundred dollars" really makes that much difference to him....he probably shouldn't be going on a cruise vacation (or any other vacation), to begin with! Just do what you're doing. Do some advance "looking" with dummy bookings and comparison shopping, etc., And over several weeks, you will probably get a "feel" for what a "good and reasonable price" would be for your itinerary and for the airline and seats you want (and are willing to pay for). Then, when the time comes, just buy the tickets and don't worry about waiting for "O" flights to open up in a few more months. Once you've got your tickets locked in, then you can put you mind and attention on other things - clothes to bring, excursions to go on, etc.. I realize that for some, the whole "vacation planning" process is a hobby.....but for others, it can easily and rapidly become an unhealthy obsession. My same friend who "worries" about (unnecessarily) paying a couple extra hundred dollars for a BC seat to Europe, is the same guy who stays at the Ritz-Carlton and buys $150-bottles of single-malt scotch ever month. "Go Figure"?? Regards.
  14. Hi Dan - Completely agree! The "larger unfortunate truth" is that year by year and as time goes on, there are simply going to be "more people on earth" then there were in the past. When DW and I first started traveling around Europe (in the 60's), we could walk around an "empty" St. Mark's Square in Venice, or "just walk into" the Vatican without any long lines or waiting times, or stroll across Westminster Bridge in London without the sidewalks being so crowded by so many other pedestrians. As (mass) discounted travel options have made "traveling for the masses" more affordable, the most favored tourist attractions (Rome, Venice, London, Alaska. etc.) have, of course, not gotten any larger themselves. During our respective remaining lifetimes, I guess the only mitigation for us (of minimizing the crowds) will be to spend more money (if available) to "upgrade" individual traveling experiences - B/C air, smaller ship/Luxury cruises to smaller ports, and more upscale hotels and restaurants - or just stay at home. Our grandchildren will unfortunately not be vacationing in the "same world" that we once did. Regards.
  15. Kingofcool - Standby for a pretty animated discussion! Regent is like "Oceania on Steroids". There have been tons of conversation on this topic...on both the Oceania and the Regent boards. I'm actually signed up for my first "O" cruise in 2020 - a Transatlantic. Up until then, all my ocean cruising has been on Regent. I've got (another) Regent cruise booked for this October. My view, which will most probably will differ from those of others, is that it shouldn't be viewed as either "one or the other". They seem to both have their strengths, and very few "weaknesses". I have to say, "seem", because I haven't been on "O" yet, but I'm more than willing to "give it a shot". For my "O" cruise, I've booked a PH1, and I've purchased the Prestige Beverage Package. I've also selected the 8 "free" excursions offered by "O Life" (4 excursions each for DW and myself). I've taken "O's" air credit - just the same as I do when cruising on Regent. I'll be on the "Riviera", which is about the same size as Regent's newest ship - "Explorer". I'm fairly confident/hopeful, that in using my own air arrangements (FC and BC), booking a PH, and purchasing the beverage package, that I've brought my upcoming "O" cruise "pretty close" to my past Regent experience/s. And my per day/per cost for the "O" cruise is moderately less expensive than the "equivalent" Regent itinerary would have been - perhaps for about 70% of the Regent cost. In cruising, like everything else, things are not always "perfect". Some people have had what they considered to be "lousy" Regent cruises, while others have had "superlative" "O" cruises - and vice versa. Regards
  16. Hi Buggins - Yes, I did see that sale and have "saved it" to refer back to and possibly "pull the trigger on". That is one of the most generous/expansive offers I think I've gotten from AA (for buying FF miles) in recent months. It works out to 2-cents a mile. One of AA's "financial wiz's" has probably figured out that it's better for them to get "today's money" now and in hand, for future FF travel, then it is to wait until later for "future possible revenue". I just might take them up on "maxing out" those FF miles (265K). Those new miles, along with what I have stored now, would be enought for the 2 BC one-way tickets to FCO. If I fly (on) AA/BA codeshare directly out of PHX to Europe (on my way to FCO), I have no choice but to go through "dreaded LHR". Yuck! Terrible transfers and I avoid Brit Air at all costs (among other things, I can't stand BA's "funky backwards seats" in BC)....(Also don't like BA's "business model" of charging you EXTRA to reserve specific/preferred seating in advance - after they've already wacked you for BC tickets...don't know who the "genius" was who thought that one up!) But I note that if I select the AA connection through PHL, I can continue on (on a "real" AA flight - not a BA codeshare) directly from PHL to FCO. And I'm one of the "probably 5 people in the world" who happen to "like" AA and DL, for trips to Europe, as opposed to a host of other choices. Thanks to everyone (including RallyDave, Geezer, HawaiiDan, Susie, et al) for all the good knowledge and thoughts you're sharing! Buying the AA miles (with this most recent "sale") actually works out cheaper for one-way tickets for myself and DW to FCO then using my "hypothetical idea" of buying R/T tickets and "trashing" the return leg. Again, thanks to all!
  17. Hi Buggins - Yes, I did see that sale and have "saved it" to refer back to and possibly "pull the trigger on". That is one of the most generous/expansive offers I think I've gotten from AA (for buying FF miles) in recent months. It works out to 2-cents a mile. One of AA's "financial wiz's" has probably figured out that it's better for them to get "today's money" now and in hand, for future FF travel, then it is to wait until later for "future possible revenue". I just might take them up on "maxing out" those FF miles (265K). Those new miles, along with what I have stored now, would be enought for the 2 BC one-way tickets to FCO. If I fly (on) AA/BA codeshare directly out of PHX to Europe (on my way to FCO), I have no choice but to go through "dreaded LHR". Yuck! Terrible transfers and I avoid Brit Air at all costs (among other things, I can't stand BA's "funky backwards seats" in BC)....(Also don't like BA's "business model" of charging you EXTRA to reserve specific/preferred seating in advance - after they've already wacked you for BC tickets...don't know who the "genius" was who thought that one up!) But I note that if I select the AA connection through PHL, I can continue on (on a "real" AA flight - not a BA codeshare) directly from PHL to FCO. And I'm one of the "probably 5 people in the world" who happen to "like" AA and DL, for trips to Europe, as opposed to a host of other choices. Thanks to everyone (including RallyDave, Geezer, HawaiiDan, Susie, et al) for all the good knowledge and thoughts you're sharing! Buying the AA miles (with this most recent "sale") actually works out cheaper for one-way tickets for myself and DW to FCO then using my "hypothetical idea" of buying R/T tickets and "trashing" the return leg. Again, thanks to all!
  18. Hi Folks - This is a great thread and I've picked up tons of good info and insight from everyone's comments already. I do have a question that I haven't quite seen discussed yet. Perhaps I've missed it, and I apologize n advance, for any redundancy. For now, this is a "hypothetical". Let's assume that I've already booked an "O" TA that starts in Rome and ends in Miami. I'm not (at least for now) planning on taking or upgrading O's air to Business Class. Rather, I'm just booking with "O" at the "no air" fare rate and arranging/paying for my own flights. So, I go online (travelocity) and "plug in" a "dummy booking" for a B/C flight from PHX to FCO on Delta on Mar 10, 2020 and I get a one-way B/C fare of $9,196. Yes, "Totally Outrageous"! I then instead, make it a R/T Business Class booking, leaving PHX on March 10 and returning from FCO to PHX on Mar 17. The R/T fare is now only $4,020 - less than half of the O/W fare. What, if anything, would prevent me from (legally) buying that R/T ticket at less than half the O/W cost and only using the "outbound" portion of the itinerary..... flying to Rome to pick up the ship (No, this not an actual sailing/itinerary/date - so don't waste time looking for it)? With this idea/scenario I'm simply going to "throw away" (not use) the return portion of the booking (from FCO back to PHX). I'm certain that on that 17th return flight, that my "unsused seat" will be filled by someone else (an upgrade, etc.). No FF miles are being used used and I am not involving a DL FF program in any wayy. For all Delta knows, I got violently ill and didn't feel like flying back home on the 17th....or I got wiped out in a 20-car pileup on the Autostrada! Are there any "down-sides" to this approach of getting a relatively cheap B/C seat (O/W) to Rome? Thanks in advance for all thoughts. Best Regards.
  19. Hello Mary (Warburg).... Mary (also) and Kelvin here. We'll also be on the Riviera TA from Rome to Miami in Oct 2020. We're hoping to convince a few of our friends/couples to come along with us. This will be our first O cruise and are very much looking forward to it. We've also been Regent cruisers in the past (and have a couple more R cruises booked) and we're more than willing to give O a try - with a completely open mind. We'll pray for calm seas, a happy crew, interesting fellow cruisers, some good ports, and "the best cuisine afloat". Best Regards!
  20. I wonder why we all have to be constantly reminded.....Oh, about 4 times each week for the past 4 years, why someone doesn't like Navigator. I think we've all received that message loud and clear by now. Oh, and is Explorer their "favorite ship"??
  21. Many, many past threads on this subject. Some suites have tub/shower combo's and other suites have walk-in shower only. You can go on the RSSC website for Mariner and see which suites have the shower only and which suites have the shower/tub combo. They are clearly "marked" with a "star". Your TA can also help you with your pick.
  22. At this point, why is the focus on some perceived shortcoming or poor practice on the part of Regent? If as TC says, "the rules have been in place in the UK for quite a while...", why not point the finger (or fault) on your TA and her/his travel company, who obviously gave you several pieces of bad/incorrect advice, which is now costing you money, as a result of following that advice? I realize that legalities and torts in various countries might be different . But in the U.S., actions and statements made by legal/licensed representatives (in this case, your travel agent/company acting on clients' behalf) to their clients, which later proves to be erroneous, costly, and which unduly penalize their clients can be held responsible for any monetary damage occurring as a result of following that advice. Why shouldn't your travel agent/agency bear the burden and reimburse you for the loss caused directly by their own incorrect information and advise which they passed along to you? Why should they get a "free pass" and you have to "eat" the loss? Just wondering. Didn't we just recently read a thread (which Jason participated in) which reiterated that clients with TA's were pretty much obligated/forced to go through (and rely upon) their TA for all information/advice/payment issues/policies, etc., etc.? It would seem to me that the TS did the "right thing" in the first place by relying on his/her TA for advice on this matter. If the TA gave incorrect advice/information which subsequently turns out to be wrong, then why would they be the ones that should be "on the hook" to restore their client's loss of funds? Just my 2-cents (or my "2 New Penney's") worth.
  23. Jason - I also applaud the entire Regent management team for listening to us and making this small but impressive improvement! Thanks for continuing to read the comments and suggestions of your most loyal (CC) customer base and for giving them serious consideration! A small "modification" like this can do wonders towards making a positive and lasting impression of the Regent "product". I can't wait for our next (2019) Regent cruise. Best Regards and Happy Holidays.
  24. Sita - You'll get a lot of different opinions regarding which various airlines are "good" for overseas travel. People on this board like to always say, "food is subjective". Well, I think the same can be said about airlines. If you're on one airline for a particular trip and have a bad experience, even if it was only a rare , one-time occurrence, a lot of folks will say, "never again" to that airline. Having flown many thousands of miles on overseas flights, on many different foreign and domestic airlines, to many different countries in the world during my working career.....My thinking is that the "worst airline" is the one you're traveling/flying with at any given moment, and having a "problem" with at that moment. Any given flight can be weather or mechanically delayed. Any plane can have problems with the toilets, any plane can run out of the dinner entree or wine you wanted, and you can wind up on any flight sitting next to a person who hasn't had a shower in a couple of days or has a fussy child that simply won't stop crying. I have experienced all those things on many different airlines. Having said all that, there are some airlines I prefer over others. I won't mention the ones I don't like (it will bring on arguments), but I'll mention a few I do like...In the Asia/Pacific area, I like Singapore, Cathay Pacific, Virgin Australia, Delta, JAL, and Hawaiian Air. To the Middle East, I like Emirates (hands down). To Europe, I like Delta, American, Swiss Air, United (although they've dropped down a few rungs on myladder in the past few years), Lufthansa, and SAS. I've never flown Aer Lingus before, but I'm going to give them a try next year for a land visit to Ireland and Scotland. One note...If you book Delta to Rome from the U.S., make sure it's a "real" Delta flight/airplane/flight crew...and NOT a code share flight that is really operated by Alitalia Airlines. I'll leave it at that. Others might have quite different and additional viewpoints. Regards.
  25. TC - Unfortunately (and inexplicably) not. Doing a "mock multi-city booking" online on several different air sites (Travelocity, UA, DL, Expedia, etc.) for next October....For a multi-city itinerary of one-way B/C seat from Phoenix to Rome, and then returning F/C from Miami to Phoenix, 2 weeks later, (all on one itinerary/booking), results in fares ranging between $9K and $11K per person. Yikes! Booking the R/T itinerary in B/C between Phoenix and Rome in Oct 2019 winds up around $4,200 and (and then just not flying the return leg on that booking). A separate One-way booking in F/C from Miami to Phoenix is about $500. For a total fare of around $4,700. That's a price difference of at least $4,000+ per person. Crazy, isn't it?!
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