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#21
Seascale,Cumbria,U.K.
5,747 Posts
Joined Dec 2008
Originally posted by davenew
I lived in the US for 6 months and my faves are "Suspenders" - used by Americans to hold up trousers i.e.Braces. Much prefer the UK use!!
Mufflers - US for exhaust pipes........durrrrr
And finally, I had a work mate who smoked, and when we visited San Fran, I had to tell him not to say that he was going outside for a FAG.
An why do Americans say they are going to the "bathroom" or "Restroom", when the neither want a bath or a rest????????? Oh well.
Or have a back yard which measures an acre.
Now, I REALLY have a back yard!!!
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20 cruises; 11 ships; 8 lines; 94 ports
#22
Southern California
37,553 Posts
Joined Oct 2005
Originally posted by hat776
Obviously English started being spoken in America as a result of English settlers there and I often wonder how and why it developed so differently.
Why is their spelling different ?
In the UK we say bag (for hand bag) . When I first started on CC I couldn't understand why the Americans always referred to a purse. Then I realised that purse means handbag . There was a thread about pick pockets and it was really confusing at first.
England and America, two countries separated by a common language.

By the way, Americans don't speak English, we speak Americanish.
#23
malta
915 Posts
Joined Feb 2008
Originally posted by jocap
Or have a back yard which measures an acre.
Now, I REALLY have a back yard!!!
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In Malta a yard means a small paved area with maybe a couple of flower beds. In films and books there are many mentions of the famous back yard. The first time I saw an actual back yard and realised they meant garden is still in my mind.
#24
Switzerland
2,222 Posts
Joined Apr 2009
You lot are so lucky only having to learn 2 versions of English . I live and work in the French speaking part of Switzerland. The official language in the office is English (spoken 100 different ways by 65 different nationalities). However, it's not UK English, we have to use US English. On top of that Swiss French is not quite the same French French for a lot of things, especially the high nubmers.

Include into that the fact we also use German (Swiss German so completely different to German German), and Italian it gets rather confusing.

Thankfully, most local people speak English, including the guy who fills my car up with diesel every week at the local garage.
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I don't have any Toblerones but have got a box of KitKats.


#25
North Yorkshire UK
271 Posts
Joined Sep 2008
Originally posted by new salt
Are you sure? I worked for a Geordie company fo a number of years (loved it) and detected the root language of Geordie as Rubbish!
Quite a few "Geordie" or Northumbrian dialect words are derived from Danish .... maybe from the Vikings! By the way, a "Geordie" has to be born within spitting distance of the Tyne. Coming from north of Newcastle originally I am, therefore, a Northumbrian, not a "Geordie". My late mother was very specific about this and often used to ring the local radio station to complain about being called a "Geordie", although she was a very proud Northumbrian.
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#27
Seascale,Cumbria,U.K.
5,747 Posts
Joined Dec 2008
The Northumbrian "R" is special to the region...almost French in sound. I hope it never dies out.
Hat- yes, my yard is about a yard square....that's how it got its name....but now it's become acceptable as a word for a garden.
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#28
1,243 Posts
Joined Jan 2007
Originally posted by davenew
An why do Americans say they are going to the "bathroom" or "Restroom", when the neither want a bath or a rest????????? Oh well.
Well I think it sounds better then saying "Toiletroom" lol.
#29
North Yorkshire UK
271 Posts
Joined Sep 2008
Originally posted by Saruman
Geordie, Northumbrian, Dane, whatever. Glorious part of the country to be from, regardless!
Totally agree! Beaches and countryside are wonderful, just a shame about the weather, though.
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#30
Eastern Spain
677 Posts
Joined Feb 2008
I was always amazed to see the young girls heading out to the Quayside for a night of mayhem and revelry dressed only in a curtain pelmet in the depth of midwinter. I believe it was a great place to be a student!
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#32
Seascale,Cumbria,U.K.
5,747 Posts
Joined Dec 2008
Originally posted by jocap
Or have a back yard which measures an acre.
Now, I REALLY have a back yard!!!
Jo.
I also have a front yard....
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#33
Isengard
415 Posts
Joined May 2009
Curtain pelmet. Had to google that!

Reminds me of my first visit to Edinburgh in May. I was still wearing my turtleneck sweater, sitting in the park waiting for an afternoon train. The citizens were out sunning themselves at lunch time. I watched a gent in a business suit remove and fold his jacket and tie, then his waistcoat (notice I didn't say 'vest') and then his white shirt. He pillowed these items and lay down in the sun. Not something I'd ever seen in the colonies. Sorry I missed the girls in the curtain pelmets.
#34
North Yorkshire UK
271 Posts
Joined Sep 2008
Originally posted by new salt
I was always amazed to see the young girls heading out to the Quayside for a night of mayhem and revelry dressed only in a curtain pelmet in the depth of midwinter. I believe it was a great place to be a student!
Its not just on the Quayside, either. It happens in the other towns in the North. Out in skimpy tops in the snow! It makes me shiver just to think about it. I believe it is because they can't be bothered to "check in" coats in the pubs/clubs or have a coat stolen. I must be a soft southerner now, need to be wrapped up well in the cold weather. Or maybe with age, we grow wiser .
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#35
136 Posts
Joined Jan 2007
In another lifetime, I sailed with a Geordie Bosun. For nearly 6 months I was convinced he was Russian, never understood a b&**#y word he said!!
#36
St. George, UT
342 Posts
Joined Oct 2010
Originally posted by Cuizer2
England and America, two countries separated by a common language.
By the way, Americans don't speak English, we speak Americanish.
Here in the states we have some big differences in the language we use. A New Englander has difficulties in the deep south, and visa versa. Out west we slip in some spanish now and then just to keep those easterners guessing. Then we have Canadians coming down for the winter months along with folks from our northern states, and that adds to all the fun. I went aboard an English corvette once and could not understand a word the Officer of the deck spoke, but his BoatswainsMate was perfectly understandable. Yes, our common language is a wonderful and sometimes confusing thing well worth talking about
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#37
malta
915 Posts
Joined Feb 2008
What's so fascinating is that English was taken to the US and Australia by emigrants from England so why did the language develop so differently.
Is the Spanish spoken on the West Coast similarly different to the Spanish spoken in S. America and in Spain ?
#38
Texas
4,089 Posts
Joined Oct 2007
Originally posted by hat776
What's so fascinating is that English was taken to the US and Australia by emigrants from England so why did the language develop so differently.
Is the Spanish spoken on the West Coast similarly different to the Spanish spoken in S. America and in Spain ?
SI! The Spanish spoken in northern Mexico is different than the Spanish spoken in southern Mexico. Then when you go from country to country in the rest of the Americas, it gets more and more different. I've seen a Spanish-English dictionary that takes into account all of the various Spanish speaking countries in the world - it's very large. Let's face it, until after World War II (and especially since the internet age), the peoples of the world were pretty insulated from those not too far away from their home...and language would not have the cross-polination that it has now.
#39
14,192 Posts
Joined Jan 2003
In most cases I find the British terms preferable, but the one I hate seeing on this site is, "Gutted." I get such a visceral image with that term that I find it off-putting.
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Is it just me who wonders why they bother painting lines on the roads in Rome?
#40
Algarve, Portugal
819 Posts
Joined Aug 2002
Originally posted by Texas Tillie
SI! The Spanish spoken in northern Mexico is different than the Spanish spoken in southern Mexico. Then when you go from country to country in the rest of the Americas, it gets more and more different. I've seen a Spanish-English dictionary that takes into account all of the various Spanish speaking countries in the world - it's very large. Let's face it, until after World War II (and especially since the internet age), the peoples of the world were pretty insulated from those not too far away from their home...and language would not have the cross-polination that it has now.
Very interesting thread. Thanks OP for starting it.

I think the distance makes all the difference in the way languages develop and diverge. European Portuguese and Brazilian Portuguese are very different, more so in my opinion (as a language professional working with both) than UK English and US English.