New Dress Code Designations?


Unregistered, just back from your Cunard cruise? Get published on Cruise Critic; Write a Review!
Cunard Line

Read hundreds of Cunard Cruise Reviews from cruisers like you.

See posts about:
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
All times are GMT -4.
The time now is 09:34 AM.
Louisiana
10 Posts
Joined Jan 2017
Originally posted by MarkieMarkNYC
. But I'll take substance of style any day, whether at the theater, on a cruise, or at a restaurant.
My thoughts exactly! Why take away from your enjoyment of the voyage by focusing on what someone else is wearing? I could care less what you are wearing, you will not affect my vacation one way or another. Live and let live, and enjoy the ride!
UK
104 Posts
Joined Sep 2014
Exactly the responses I was expecting. Which proves my contention that it is pointless to wail and whinge on here about the lowering of Cunard's standards because the prevailing view and actions are just this. "I'll wear what I like when I like.' and all too frequently the attitude of , 'And I'll do what I like when I like.' goes along with that. And that's just how it is. See the many, many posts on here over the years from people, usually males, asking questions about what they can 'get away with' on formal nights, how far can they stretch the rules, will there be sanctions against dining etc. etc.
And of course my post was judgemental, (what a pejorative word that has become), if I can judge someone as being smartly dressed then I can do the same for someone who isn't. We all make judgements about other other people, it's human nature. How often do we hear the plaintive cry of 'Don't judge me'. Well how the dickens are we to come to any conclusions without a judgement.
MM
15 Posts
Joined Mar 2018
I think the point that is missing is we older folks were taught that appropriate dress is a sign of respect - that you care enough to take the trouble to wear what is expected of you. If the expected changes to less formal, I feel you can always dress up but not down. So, let us wear on the Queens as dressy as we wish - yes, even ball gowns because we can't look down on someone dressing on the "upside". Where else can you wear it anymore if not on the Queens?

By the way, it is not just sloppy Americans who don't dress up anymore. We went to the theatre in London last time we were there over 5 years ago and my husband and I were the only ones in a suit and elegant dress. The others were in flip flops and shorts. However, I think the pendulum is starting to swing the other way when they found out people took their jobs more seriously when dressed in suits rather than casual.
Kansas City
517 Posts
Joined Nov 2012
We have chosen in the past to spend our retirement travel funds on Cunard as a way to escape this downward spiral. If the experience is no longer the traditional Cunard of the past, why would I continue to travel with them?

If Carnival Corporation views Cunard as just another one of their cookie cutter lines for mass travel, what other icons on Cunard ships will go next? Will they see a need to still have a dedicated ballroom taking up all that non-revenue producing space when they could add even more revenue producing cabins or perhaps a couple of new bars for those wanting 24/7 Rock, Hip-Hop or other recorded pop music for breakdancing rather than those old fashioned live musicians playing Classical or Jazz music for listening.
363 Posts
Joined Aug 2016
Originally posted by Merry Maid
Exactly the responses I was expecting. Which proves my contention that it is pointless to wail and whinge on here about the lowering of Cunard's standards because the prevailing view and actions are just this. "I'll wear what I like when I like.' and all too frequently the attitude of , 'And I'll do what I like when I like.' goes along with that. And that's just how it is. See the many, many posts on here over the years from people, usually males, asking questions about what they can 'get away with' on formal nights, how far can they stretch the rules, will there be sanctions against dining etc. etc.
And of course my post was judgemental, (what a pejorative word that has become), if I can judge someone as being smartly dressed then I can do the same for someone who isn't. We all make judgements about other other people, it's human nature. How often do we hear the plaintive cry of 'Don't judge me'. Well how the dickens are we to come to any conclusions without a judgement.
MM
It would seem you have missed the point.
363 Posts
Joined Aug 2016
Originally posted by BobBranst
Well said.

We have chosen in the past to spend our retirement travel funds on Cunard as a way to escape this downward spiral. If the experience is no longer the traditional Cunard of the past, why would I continue to travel with them?

If Carnival Corporation views Cunard as just another one of their cookie cutter lines for mass travel, what other icons on Cunard ships will go next? Will they see a need to still have a dedicated ballroom taking up all that non-revenue producing space when they could add even more revenue producing cabins or perhaps a couple of new bars for those wanting 24/7 Rock, Hip-Hop or other recorded pop music for breakdancing rather than those old fashioned live musicians playing Classical or Jazz music for listening.
Yes, I am sure that is where they are headed.
Mississauga, Canada
1,466 Posts
Joined Oct 2000
The arguments in favour of Cunard dumbing down the dress code often relate to "people are not dressing up as much as before" or "people from California and Australia don't 'do' formal." I understand that. I don't wear a jacket and tie as much as I used to, which elicits adverse comments from some of my friends and our son (a millennial). To me, going to sea is a special occasion. In any event, dressing the same way 365 days a year sounds incredibly boring. We know that all other lines have dumbed down their dress codes to a certain extent - or worse - but surely there is a place on the seas for a few ships that go against the trend.


The "slippery slope" argument is a valid one - and not just pertaining to the standards of dress. On another site there have been complaints that the entertainment on Cunard is too high brow or serious. These people ignore the reality that Cunard provides a full range of entertainment to suit all tastes. Not many ships do that. There are some cruise lines that blare pop music to you everywhere, including (according to the daughter of a friend of ours) in the alleyway outside their cabin 24 hours a day. Should Cunard do away with lectures and classical concerts because people from (insert any country or demographic) don't like them? Cunard has already added what was traditionally "informal", i.e., a suit and tie, to the definition of formal and removed the requirement for a jacket and tie for men in the restaurants on every night. On our earlier crossings (six nights) on the QM2 there were four formal nights. On a one-week cruise five years ago there were three formal nights as on a crossing, but our last two cruises had only two.



In the decades since my first Cunard voyage I have seen a lot of changes. For certain, many of them have been positive. I'm not suggesting that dodge 'ems and belly-flop competitions are coming soon to Cunard, but Cunard should be careful or - as others have said - what is the point of them.
Cambridgeshire, UK
902 Posts
Joined Feb 2009
Originally posted by david,Mississauga
The arguments in favour of Cunard dumbing down the dress code often relate to "people are not dressing up as much as before" or "people from California and Australia don't 'do' formal." I understand that. I don't wear a jacket and tie as much as I used to, which elicits adverse comments from some of my friends and our son (a millennial). To me, going to sea is a special occasion. In any event, dressing the same way 365 days a year sounds incredibly boring. We know that all other lines have dumbed down their dress codes to a certain extent - or worse - but surely there is a place on the seas for a few ships that go against the trend.


The "slippery slope" argument is a valid one - and not just pertaining to the standards of dress. On another site there have been complaints that the entertainment on Cunard is too high brow or serious. These people ignore the reality that Cunard provides a full range of entertainment to suit all tastes. Not many ships do that. There are some cruise lines that blare pop music to you everywhere, including (according to the daughter of a friend of ours) in the alleyway outside their cabin 24 hours a day. Should Cunard do away with lectures and classical concerts because people from (insert any country or demographic) don't like them? Cunard has already added what was traditionally "informal", i.e., a suit and tie, to the definition of formal and removed the requirement for a jacket and tie for men in the restaurants on every night. On our earlier crossings (six nights) on the QM2 there were four formal nights. On a one-week cruise five years ago there were three formal nights as on a crossing, but our last two cruises had only two.



In the decades since my first Cunard voyage I have seen a lot of changes. For certain, many of them have been positive. I'm not suggesting that dodge 'ems and belly-flop competitions are coming soon to Cunard, but Cunard should be careful or - as others have said - what is the point of them.
Here, here. Great post!
Washington, DC
664 Posts
Joined Feb 2011
Originally posted by david,Mississauga
The arguments in favour of Cunard dumbing down the dress code often relate to "people are not dressing up as much as before" or "people from California and Australia don't 'do' formal." I understand that. I don't wear a jacket and tie as much as I used to, which elicits adverse comments from some of my friends and our son (a millennial). To me, going to sea is a special occasion. In any event, dressing the same way 365 days a year sounds incredibly boring. We know that all other lines have dumbed down their dress codes to a certain extent - or worse - but surely there is a place on the seas for a few ships that go against the trend.


The "slippery slope" argument is a valid one - and not just pertaining to the standards of dress. On another site there have been complaints that the entertainment on Cunard is too high brow or serious. These people ignore the reality that Cunard provides a full range of entertainment to suit all tastes. Not many ships do that. There are some cruise lines that blare pop music to you everywhere, including (according to the daughter of a friend of ours) in the alleyway outside their cabin 24 hours a day. Should Cunard do away with lectures and classical concerts because people from (insert any country or demographic) don't like them? Cunard has already added what was traditionally "informal", i.e., a suit and tie, to the definition of formal and removed the requirement for a jacket and tie for men in the restaurants on every night. On our earlier crossings (six nights) on the QM2 there were four formal nights. On a one-week cruise five years ago there were three formal nights as on a crossing, but our last two cruises had only two.



In the decades since my first Cunard voyage I have seen a lot of changes. For certain, many of them have been positive. I'm not suggesting that dodge 'ems and belly-flop competitions are coming soon to Cunard, but Cunard should be careful or - as others have said - what is the point of them.


Thank you for this splendid post. It says what needs to be said, and it says it well. Slopes can be slippery and those that step on them should be very careful.


Sent from my iPhone using Forums
4,185 Posts
Joined Nov 2004
Returned today from the May 10 crossing. I was honestly shocked at how many men didn’t wear jackets on informal nights(like 5 percent but still), and saw quite a few get turned away on formal nights for not wearing ties.
Manchester, UK
10,494 Posts
Joined Apr 2005
Originally posted by sppunk
Returned today from the May 10 crossing. I was honestly shocked at how many men didn’t wear jackets on informal nights(like 5 percent but still), and saw quite a few get turned away on formal nights for not wearing ties.
So ahocked that maybe 5% of male passengers were not wearing jackets, so that’s what maybe 70 men out of an average of 1350 gentlemen, assuming a 50% split of nearly a 2695 maximum total capacity?

Wow, I’d be more concerned if it were 50% non compliance.
Expand Signature
Collapse Signature
Peteukmcr from Manchester, UK





4,185 Posts
Joined Nov 2004
Originally posted by peteukmcr
So ahocked that maybe 5% of male passengers were not wearing jackets, so that’s what maybe 70 men out of an average of 1350 gentlemen, assuming a 50% split of nearly a 2695 maximum total capacity?

Wow, I’d be more concerned if it were 50% non compliance.
Shocked I mean by the dining room staff not stopping them.
Batehaven, Australia
11,480 Posts
Joined Mar 2006
Originally posted by sppunk
Shocked I mean by the dining room staff not stopping them.
The staff have given up, same on QM2 in March last year, Sydney to HK. Formal nights, Adidas Track suit tops mixed up with the Dinner suits...ugly.
Expand Signature
Collapse Signature
Cheers..(Uncle) LES - Princess Captains Circle Elite. - 480 days.

Cruised with Princess, Celebrity, Cunard, P&O Australia, P&O UK, Carnival, Sitmar, Sydney Harbour Ferries. World Cruise, plus British Isles, Europe, Med, Greek Isles, Transatlantic, Asia, USA, Panama Canal, South America, Central America, Caribbean, Alaska, Canada, Japan, South Pacific, Australia, New Zealand.!

**Last cruise: Queen Mary 2 - Sydney - HK, 16 nights, 2 - 18 March 2017.

**Next: (We were booked on Adonia x 2, but they sold the ship on us.)
Sapphire Princess - 26 May 2018, Scandinavia, ex Southampton - 7 nights B2B with..
Sapphire Princess - 2 June 2018, Baltic Heritage, ex Southampton - 14 nights.
Royal Princess - 18 June 2018 - British Isles, ex Southampton - 12 nights.

'Adventure before Dementia - Live for Today !!'