Keeping Cameras Charged All Day

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#1
Ohio
278 Posts
Joined Jun 2004
We are going to Europe and will be away from the ship all day on tours. Looking for the best way to keep cameras charged. Certainly don't want to miss out on that once in a lifetime photo due to dead batteries. Probably going to purchase extra batteries but also wondering which, if any, of the portable chargers work well.

Thanks.....
#2
4,384 Posts
Joined Dec 2014
Which camera model do you have? Mirrorless cameras eat through batteries quickly.

I hear some of the Sony's can be charged with a battery pack.
#3
Denmark
1,902 Posts
Joined Mar 2011
I do have an additional battery for each camera - make sure that both batteries are fully charged at the beginning of the tour. Never had problems - I have three cameras (all different).
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#4
Los Angeles
283 Posts
Joined Dec 2013
I carry several spare batteries for my cameras...gets me through the day until I get back and can re-charge them.
Don't skimp on memory cards either!
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#5
Ohio
278 Posts
Joined Jun 2004
Thanks All! Extra batteries it is and we did stock up on memory cards during the specials over the Holidays!
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#6
5,998 Posts
Joined Jun 2004
From a photography teacher:

Buy a camera that takes AA batteries. These cameras are a little bigger, and they fit the average person's hands better; thus, you'll take better pictures than you would with one of those teeny-tiny cameras ... the teeny-tiny cameras tend to have teeny-tiny buttons, which aren't so user-friendly. Even putting that detail aside, the slightly larger cameras tend to take better pictures and have a few more features, yet they still fit in a man's shirt pocket or a woman's small purse easily. Getting back to the question at hand, you can carry an extra set of AAs in your pocket, or you can pick up more batteries in the closest store -- that's a pretty big benefit.

Which one's best? I personally lean towards Cannons, but I also have a Nikkon and a couple Fujis that are very good quality. Truthfully, if you're talking about point-and-shoots, it doesn't matter much what brand you choose. As you work your way up the price ladder, the quality does improve ... but a $100 Cannon is pretty much the same as a $100 Fuji ... and a $300 Cannon is pretty much the same thing as a $300 Fuji. So determine your budget, then pick a point-and-shoot in a color that pleases you.

One more point: Allot money in your camera budget for a memory card and a carrying case.
#7
5,998 Posts
Joined Jun 2004
Originally posted by TinCan782
... Don't skimp on memory cards either!
Take away the "s" on cards, and I'll agree.

The newer SD cards can literally hold thousands of pictures! In my opinion, a 64 GB card is kind of the sweet spot: You're not going to fill it up during a week-long vacation, yet it only costs $25-30. You can get SD cards up to 128 GB, but they do cost more.

If you take only one card, it'll stay in your camera the whole time, and you're less likely to lose your camera than a tiny card. You're also less likely to damage a card that's inside your camera.

Name brand doesn't matter, but always go with a "pro" model card with a high load number. This means that your camera will "recover" from taking a picture and will be ready for your next picture more quickly (don't expect to take sports pictures, of course, with a point-and-shoot -- you will end up with a blurry mess) ... it also means that your pictures will load faster to your computer.
#8
Los Angeles
283 Posts
Joined Dec 2013
Originally posted by MrsPete
Take away the "s" on cards, and I'll agree.

The newer SD cards can literally hold thousands of pictures! In my opinion, a 64 GB card is kind of the sweet spot: You're not going to fill it up during a week-long vacation, yet it only costs $25-30. You can get SD cards up to 128 GB, but they do cost more.

If you take only one card, it'll stay in your camera the whole time, and you're less likely to lose your camera than a tiny card. You're also less likely to damage a card that's inside your camera.

Name brand doesn't matter, but always go with a "pro" model card with a high load number. This means that your camera will "recover" from taking a picture and will be ready for your next picture more quickly (don't expect to take sports pictures, of course, with a point-and-shoot -- you will end up with a blurry mess) ... it also means that your pictures will load faster to your computer.
Even though CF and SD cards are very reliable now, I still don't "put all my eggs in one basket". Each day starts with a clean card...end of day it gets placed in some place other than my camera bag...the cabin safe, etc. And on a good day, I could fill a 64gb card as I shoot in "RAW" format.
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#9
4,384 Posts
Joined Dec 2014
Originally posted by MrsPete
Buy a camera that takes AA batteries. These cameras are a little bigger, and they fit the average person's hands better; thus, you'll take better pictures than you would with one of those teeny-tiny cameras ... the teeny-tiny cameras tend to have teeny-tiny buttons, which aren't so user-friendly. Even putting that detail aside, the slightly larger cameras tend to take better pictures and have a few more features, yet they still fit in a man's shirt pocket or a woman's small purse easily. Getting back to the question at hand, you can carry an extra set of AAs in your pocket, or you can pick up more batteries in the closest store -- that's a pretty big benefit.
Thoughts....
  • Totally love my economical AA Eneloops chambered into my FX Nikon D800. Adapters like the MB-D12 allow all my Nikon's to be AA powered.
  • The SD-8a allows me to gang up nearly a dozen AA's to my flashes for quick recycle.
  • Are there AA powered mirrorless cameras?
#10
5,998 Posts
Joined Jun 2004
Originally posted by TinCan782
Even though CF and SD cards are very reliable now, I still don't "put all my eggs in one basket". Each day starts with a clean card...end of day it gets placed in some place other than my camera bag...the cabin safe, etc. And on a good day, I could fill a 64gb card as I shoot in "RAW" format.
My own personal opinion: Your chances of losing or damaging a memory card while transferring it from camera-to-storage are much greater than your chances of having a card go bad. I remember once having a CF card go bad, but you're not shooting CF these days. With all the students I've taught -- some of who treat equipment carefully, some who don't -- I've literally never seen a card go bad. Another option is to have your photos sent automatically to the Cloud.


How could you possibly fill a 64G card in one day ... unless you're just shooting indiscriminately ... I tell my students all the time, "Push the button fewer times but with more thought behind the push" ... which seems to go against the idea of shooting in RAW?

Originally posted by xlxo
Thoughts....
  • Are there AA powered mirrorless cameras?
I think the answer is no, but I'm not knowledgeable enough on this subject to say that with absolutely certainty.
#11
Los Angeles
283 Posts
Joined Dec 2013
Originally posted by MrsPete
My own personal opinion: Your chances of losing or damaging a memory card while transferring it from camera-to-storage are much greater than your chances of having a card go bad. I remember once having a CF card go bad, but you're not shooting CF these days. With all the students I've taught -- some of who treat equipment carefully, some who don't -- I've literally never seen a card go bad. Another option is to have your photos sent automatically to the Cloud.


How could you possibly fill a 64G card in one day ... unless you're just shooting indiscriminately ... I tell my students all the time, "Push the button fewer times but with more thought behind the push" ... which seems to go against the idea of shooting in RAW?
OK...I misspoke on that ... maybe 16-32 gb per day however, I still use a clean card each day to avoid "putting all my eggs in one basket". Shooting indiscriminately...perhaps...when I find a shot, I tend to explore it and yes, I spend a lot of time in Adobe Bridge and Camera Raw when I get home editing through all those images. I like having the options later.

As for card reliability, its been a while since I've seen a card go "belly-up". At work perhaps one in a thousand with CF cards in DSLRs. My last failure was a 64Gig micro SD card in my GoPro...in the camera? In my hand? In my desktop? Several attempts with several different recovery programs were unable to fix it. The day's activities went in the trash. In the "early" days, most instances of card corruption were attributable to deleting (bad) images in camera, usually to gain free space. We still advise to do no editing in camera. Do it after the images are safely uploaded to your workstation.

I appreciate your comment "more thought behind the push". In my film days (including a 4x5 view camera) I did give thought before exposing a sheet or frame of film but now, as I mentioned above, I tend to "explore" a shot. Memory cards are inexpensive..

Thanks for your comments.
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Other rail - White Pass and Yukon Route Railway - Skagway to Carcross, Grand Canyon Railway, Fillmore and Western Railway, Napa Valley Wine Train, Metrolink, Private railcar excursions.
#12
18 Posts
Joined Dec 2007
I carry 3 or 4 batteries at all times in a very small carry case made for camera cards and batteries. At the end of the day if the computer room (on Holland Am) is still open I download all the days pictures onto my Zip drive and stick that in my room safe. That way I will never loose more than 1 days pictures. Maybe other lines also have computers you can use for such work.
#15
United States
1,345 Posts
Joined Jul 2014
Originally posted by MrsPete
From a photography teacher:

... Cannons, but I also have a Nikkon ....
You would think a photography teacher would know how to spell the camera names.

Canon and Nikon.

But they probably drive a Foord and Jeeep.
#16
37 Posts
Joined Nov 2016
Extra batteries are going to be less weight than an external battery pack. In terms of memory cards, don't get a single card big enough for all the vacation photos. Use multiple cards.

I use the 32 GB sandisk extreme pro cards. The card can typically hold about 700+ photos (I shoot RAW), which is a good amount. I always keep a spare card in my pocket or camera bag. I also have a waterproof card case too.
At then end of the night I copy the card over to an external drive (I bring a windows tablet and external hard drive) and then upload to the cloud overnight.

I'll try not to erase any card until they are for sure backed up or I'm back home.

Tips:
1. Sandisk extreme and extreme pro cards include sandisk rescue pro recovery software
2. If a card goes bad, stop using it, if you need to recover the files quarantine the card and then recover the files when you can
3. In lieu of taking a laptop with you, you can get travel routers that read and write sd and USB drives.
4. Don't use bags and camera straps that have camera brands on them.... while it's nice that canon sent you an EOS 5D camera strap... you just announced you have an expensive camera to the world.


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#17
6 Posts
Joined Oct 2017
I prefer to carry the battery charger or buy fresh batteries day before (shopping never ends). My SD cards are each 32GB but then at the end of the day have to take a backup on my iPad so found EyeFi SD card that backs up photos over wifi straight to my iPad immediately. And saves me from carrying too many SD cards.
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#18
Las Vegas
11,245 Posts
Joined Feb 2007
Originally posted by TinCan782
Even though CF and SD cards are very reliable now, I still don't "put all my eggs in one basket". Each day starts with a clean card...end of day it gets placed in some place other than my camera bag...the cabin safe, etc. And on a good day, I could fill a 64gb card as I shoot in "RAW" format.
+1 on this comment. Also, if by some chance your camera gets lost or stolen, you only loose one day's worth of pictures.

DON
#19
I come from a land down under
23,812 Posts
Joined Jul 2014
Originally posted by TinCan782
Even though CF and SD cards are very reliable now, I still don't "put all my eggs in one basket". Each day starts with a clean card...end of day it gets placed in some place other than my camera bag...the cabin safe, etc. And on a good day, I could fill a 64gb card as I shoot in "RAW" format.

A person after my own heart, shoot raw and JPEG use smaller cards so if one fails it’s only 100 or so photos. I also tend to carry two cameras, one with wide zoom the other Tele zoom reduces the risk further still.
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#20
37 Posts
Joined Nov 2016
Originally posted by TropicalPineapple
I prefer to carry the battery charger or buy fresh batteries day before (shopping never ends). My SD cards are each 32GB but then at the end of the day have to take a backup on my iPad so found EyeFi SD card that backs up photos over wifi straight to my iPad immediately. And saves me from carrying too many SD cards.


The only bad thing about the eye-fi cards is that you are paying extra for a technology that at any moment can and has been discontinued. I used to use their pro cards and one day they just announced "were discontinuing these and all support for them"

Also you aren't really backing up your photos if you transfer them from the sd card to your iPad, and then delete from the card. you just copied them.

I copy my photos from the card, to a USB thumb drive, and to another hard drive.... then if I can I upload them to the cloud too


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