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*Mach*

Prohibited items on Carnival ships

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In an effort to minimize the misinformation regarding what is and what is not prohibited on Carnival ships I'm posting this recently released list. PLEASE read it carefully. Thank you.

 

RESTRICTED ITEMS – SAFETY AND SECURITY POLICY

 

In order to maintain a safe and secure environment, Carnival prohibits bringing certain items onboard. Additionally, we reserve the right to confiscate (and destroy) any articles that in our discretion are considered dangerous or pose a risk or inconvenience to the safety and security of the ship, or our guests, and no compensation will be provided.

 

Confiscated Items

 

• Alcohol (hard liquor)/sealed, unopened bottles

• Beer/sealed, unopened bottles/cans

• Wine or champagne/sealed, unopened bottles - beyond the allowable limit of one bottle per adult 21 years of age (brought on at embarkation time only)

• Clothing irons and steamers (all Carnival ships offer laundry facilities with irons and ironing boards. Fleet-wide valet laundry service is also available for a nominal fee.)

• Electrical and household appliances (i.e. coffee makers, hot plates, toasters, etc.)

• Candles

• Heating Pads

• Incense

 

Prohibited Items – will be disposed of prior to boarding

 

• Large coolers

• Alcohol in unsealed containers

• Firearms (i.e., non-firing weapons and starter pistols)

• Ammunition (i.e., bullets, shot or missile that can be fired using a propellant)

• Imitation or replica weapons (i.e., de-commissioned weapons or those not capable of being fired, toy weapons, or any other item made, intended or adapted to be used as a weapon)

• Explosives or explosive component parts, (i.e., detonators)

• Fireworks or pyrotechnics (except those previously approved in connection with a company stage production which have been properly manifested)

• Taser or electronic stun guns

• Pepper or mace sprays

• Telescopic or regular batons

• Martial arts equipment (i.e., flails, throwing stars, belt buckle knives, etc.)

• Handcuffs, brass knuckles

• Compressed gas bottles/cylinders

• Knives with blades longer than four (4) inches ( Recreational dive knives are allowed but must be held in the custody of the Guest Services Manager or Chief Security Officer and must be checked out/in by the owner for dive excursions during the cruise.)

• Dive tanks (empty or full), diver spears/slings

• Household goods or tools of trade

• Volatile and highly flammable liquids such as cigarette lighter fluid

• Scissors with blades longer than four (4) inches (Large scissors of the type used by scrapbook and quilting enthusiasts are at times permitted with prior notification from the Security Services Department, but are held onboard in the same manner as dive knives.)

• Metal detectors

• Medical Marijuana

• Bicycles

• Surfboards

• Scooters (only permitted if used for mobility – must be stored in guest’s stateroom)

• Boats/canoes

• Segways

• Any footwear with wheels, i.e. Heely’s type shoes

 

Miscellaneous Concerns:

 

• Personal grooming devices such as hair dryers, flat and curling irons, shavers, etc., are allowed on board when used with proper caution. These devices should not be used when other electrical appliances are plugged in. However, if such devices are determined to pose a hazard, they will be removed and returned the last day of the cruise prior to debark.

 

• Electronics such as laptops, cameras, cellular phones, etc. are allowed on board when used with proper caution.

 

• Electrical devices such as fans, power strips, multi plug box outlets/adaptors, and extension cords will be removed if determined to pose a hazard and returned the last day of the cruise prior to debark.

 

• Medical gas bottles/oxygen cylinders: Allowed in connection with a certified medical condition but cannot be packed in baggage. Oxygen cylinders must be delivered to guest services and stored in a designated safe area.

 

• Coolers: Small, personal-sized coolers no larger than 12” x 12” x 12” for the purpose of housing small quantities of non-alcoholic beverages and/or medications are permitted as carry-on luggage.

 

• Live Animals: Only qualified service animals once approved by Guest Access Services at time of booking.

 

• Flowers and Plants: May be brought on board in the port of embarkation but are not permitted to be taken off the ship in the United States, per the U.S Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) Agricultural Division.

 

• Musical Instruments: Only if the guest is participating in a pre-approved ship performance.

 

• Radios/Boom Boxes: For the comfort of all our guests, radios and boom boxes can be used with headphones or earpieces when used in public areas.

 

• Floatation Devices: For the comfort of all our guests, rafts, tubes and floatation devices other than those used as life preservers (water wings) cannot be used in the swimming pools on board.

 

• Wrapped Gifts: Guests may bring wrapped gifts on board; however, due to heightened security, the gift may have to be unwrapped, upon request.

 

• DVDs/VCRs/Nintendo/Play Units: Due to compatibility issues with stateroom televisions, these items can only be utilized in suites and guests must provide their own RCA cables.

 

• Fish Caught on Fishing Expeditions: The fish cannot be brought on board; it must be shipped home.

 

• Items for In Port Use only: Snorkel gear, skateboards, golf clubs, fishing rods (packed), tennis rackets, kites (packed), roller blades/skates

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Thanks Mach was getting ready to contact special services to make sure my DH CPAP machine was logged on their end and the application power strip.

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I think with all the newer technology cruise ships will need to upgrade their power grids to support additional usage. While I don't plan on using my cell phone or laptop while on a cruise, I have had to work while on vacation elsewhere and it's annoying when hotels don't have even a couple outlets for phone and laptop in reasonable areas. And I used to use a CPAP...again outlets near the beds were taken by lap and clock. I'm sure on a ship they need the extension cord to even get the CPAP near the bed.

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Their suggestion is where possible to put these in your carry on and where this is not possible to please place them in your suitcase with a note attached to the charger etc that says “USED FOR MEDICAL REASONS.”

 

Simple enough.... I envision Carnival ships having more medical problems that a navy hospital ship...L:)L~~!!~~

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I can't thank you enough for following through to get the information for all of us.

 

Just in case there is ever a future issue or if an answer wasn't available by the time I had to fly to our port - I was able to contact my Doctor who was able to issue a formal statement stating the medical necessity of the equipment, his strong recommendation that a surge protector/power strip be used to protect the patient (me), and his suggestion that an extension cord was not medically necessary nor required for safe operation of the equipment but would be mandatory if an outlet was not within reach of the equipment.

 

Again, thanks for allowing all of us to use you to get the information we "demand" for our cruising life.

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I can't thank you enough for following through to get the information for all of us.

 

Just in case there is ever a future issue or if an answer wasn't available by the time I had to fly to our port - I was able to contact my Doctor who was able to issue a formal statement stating the medical necessity of the equipment, his strong recommendation that a surge protector/power strip be used to protect the patient (me), and his suggestion that an extension cord was not medically necessary nor required for safe operation of the equipment but would be mandatory if an outlet was not within reach of the outlet.

 

Again, thanks for allowing all of us to use you to get the information we "demand" for our cruising life.

 

 

It's a pleasure to be able to help. I've got a lot of friends at Carnival and I'm amazed they put up with me pressing issues like this but they need to be answered...

:)

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This makes no sense to me. New technologies such as cell phones, laptops, etc., draw very little power as do the small fans people bring on board. Regardless of how many things you load onto a single circuit, both the breaker and the outlet are designed to fail before the wiring would ever reach the point of becoming a fire hazard. So I am having trouble with John's statement that, "Obviously, allowing lots of electrical items to be plugged into the ships system is dangerous and can overload it." In fact, the per room consumption of electricity has been reduced significantly for the cruiselines the last few years because of the replacement of CRT TVs with LCD TVs and the use of CFLs over traditional lightbulbs and there are several per stateroom. (17" CRT= 90 watts but a 17" LCD uses 40 watts; 60 Watt incandesent light bulb = 60 watts but an equivilant light output CFL uses only 18 watts). So with assuming 6 light bulbs spread throughout the room and 1 TV, they are saving 302 Watts per room if everything was turned on all at once.

Now that they have saved that 302 watts per room which the ships existing systems were already designed to handle, lets look at usage: If I plug in a clock radio, that is a big 4 watts. If I lugged a box fan the size of your luggage onboard and plugged it in my room, that would be another 100 watts. Let's say the kiddos snuck in their XBOX 360 and hooked it up for another 185 watts. OK, I am up to 289 watts total even with the oversized fan instead of the 4 inch one which people actually bring, and the ship is still underload.

Even though they are on seperate circuits, the machinery and appliances of the ship are huge power hogs. The room consumption pales in comparison. I wonder if their real issue is that they are trying to run one less generator all the time in order to save the fuel that consumes?

I'm not buying your story John. Can you show me some data? How about all the fire reports of the problems this has been causing? What if I consider my fan medically necessary because of your undercooled rooms where the guy they send says it's working fine?

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This makes no sense to me. New technologies such as cell phones, laptops, etc., draw very little power as do the small fans people bring on board. Regardless of how many things you load onto a single circuit, both the breaker and the outlet are designed to fail before the wiring would ever reach the point of becoming a fire hazard. So I am having trouble with John's statement that, "Obviously, allowing lots of electrical items to be plugged into the ships system is dangerous and can overload it." In fact, the per room consumption of electricity has been reduced significantly for the cruiselines the last few years because of the replacement of CRT TVs with LCD TVs and the use of CFLs over traditional lightbulbs and there are several per stateroom. (17" CRT= 90 watts but a 17" LCD uses 40 watts; 60 Watt incandesent light bulb = 60 watts but an equivilant light output CFL uses only 18 watts). So with assuming 6 light bulbs spread throughout the room and 1 TV, they are saving 302 Watts per room if everything was turned on all at once.

 

Now that they have saved that 302 watts per room which the ships existing systems were already designed to handle, lets look at usage: If I plug in a clock radio, that is a big 4 watts. If I lugged a box fan the size of your luggage onboard and plugged it in my room, that would be another 100 watts. Let's say the kiddos snuck in their XBOX 360 and hooked it up for another 185 watts. OK, I am up to 289 watts total even with the oversized fan instead of the 4 inch one which people actually bring, and the ship is still underload.

 

Even though they are on seperate circuits, the machinery and appliances of the ship are huge power hogs. The room consumption pales in comparison. I wonder if their real issue is that they are trying to run one less generator all the time in order to save the fuel that consumes?

 

I'm not buying your story John. Can you show me some data? How about all the fire reports of the problems this has been causing? What if I consider my fan medically necessary because of your undercooled rooms where the guy they send says it's working fine?

Well done. I think you should post this on John's blog and ask him to reply.

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This makes no sense to me. New technologies such as cell phones, laptops, etc., draw very little power as do the small fans people bring on board. Regardless of how many things you load onto a single circuit, both the breaker and the outlet are designed to fail before the wiring would ever reach the point of becoming a fire hazard. So I am having trouble with John's statement that, "Obviously, allowing lots of electrical items to be plugged into the ships system is dangerous and can overload it." In fact, the per room consumption of electricity has been reduced significantly for the cruiselines the last few years because of the replacement of CRT TVs with LCD TVs and the use of CFLs over traditional lightbulbs and there are several per stateroom. (17" CRT= 90 watts but a 17" LCD uses 40 watts; 60 Watt incandesent light bulb = 60 watts but an equivilant light output CFL uses only 18 watts). So with assuming 6 light bulbs spread throughout the room and 1 TV, they are saving 302 Watts per room if everything was turned on all at once.

 

Now that they have saved that 302 watts per room which the ships existing systems were already designed to handle, lets look at usage: If I plug in a clock radio, that is a big 4 watts. If I lugged a box fan the size of your luggage onboard and plugged it in my room, that would be another 100 watts. Let's say the kiddos snuck in their XBOX 360 and hooked it up for another 185 watts. OK, I am up to 289 watts total even with the oversized fan instead of the 4 inch one which people actually bring, and the ship is still underload.

 

Even though they are on seperate circuits, the machinery and appliances of the ship are huge power hogs. The room consumption pales in comparison. I wonder if their real issue is that they are trying to run one less generator all the time in order to save the fuel that consumes?

 

I'm not buying your story John. Can you show me some data? How about all the fire reports of the problems this has been causing? What if I consider my fan medically necessary because of your undercooled rooms where the guy they send says it's working fine?

 

 

Chuck, it's not John... he's merely repeating what he's told. He doesn't have a clue about how the systems work.

I can tell you that it would be nearly impossible to run with one of the six generators shut down. The engines are Warstila 12 W 46C diesels that produce 12,600 kW each. They not only produce power for the electric motors that drive the ship but also provide all the additional power for ship operations including the passenger cabins. Shutting down one would dramatically impact the performance of the ship. In fact, just last week one DID shut down for about three hours and the speed of the ship was reduced by four knots delaying arrival at Cozumel...

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Thank you for reaching out to John about this.

 

As others have mentioned, this is something Carnival will have to work around, the simple fact is, there are many options when it comes to taking a vacation.

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Chuck, it's not John... he's merely repeating what he's told. He doesn't have a clue about how the systems work.

 

I can tell you that it would be nearly impossible to run with one of the six generators shut down. The engines are Warstila 12 W 46C diesels that produce 12,600 kW each. They not only produce power for the electric motors that drive the ship but also provide all the additional power for ship operations including the passenger cabins. Shutting down one would dramatically impact the performance of the ship. In fact, just last week one DID shut down for about three hours and the speed of the ship was reduced by four knots delaying arrival at Cozumel...

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks Mach, that's even better.:) I was giving them the assumption that they kept staterooms, general ship equipment, critical ships systems, and engines on different grids. If they are worried about the consumption of the passenger cabins "overloading" the systems, then they aren't even close! Their power consumption pales in comparison to everything else. That brings us back to the wiring of the circuits and basic electrical codes for how much each branch circuit can handle. And, as stated in my previous post, they have reduced those loads considerably the past few years. So, even if you fully loaded your power strip with the stuff you brought on board, there should be no problem at all. They only exception to that would be if you stuck several hairdryers and/or curling irons all on the same powerstrip. (breaker or powerstrip would trip anyway). As they already provide a hair dryer for each room, all they would have to do is ban bringing hair dryers on board (Ducking from the ladies!!:))

 

We'll instead of bringing our fans, we can just bring extra hair dryers and turn up the blower speed to max, but turn the heat off and whola!, we have an approved fan! All I need to do now is make a simple conical shaped diffuser to stick on the end to distribute the air flow over the same area as a small fan. Problem solved!! :):)

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Gosh all of these years I have been bringing a power strip to use in my stateroom. It is hard to plug in my battery charger in those sockets so the power strip comes in handy!

 

I had no idea I was breaking all kinds of rules and I have never been informed by any ships crew on Carnival or any other line that these were not allowed.

 

Is this a new thing? Why the sudden interest in banning these items? :confused:

 

I will be sure to follow the rules from now on and not take a power strip in the future. I dont want any trouble. :o

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Thanks Mach, that's even better.:) I was giving them the assumption that they kept staterooms, general ship equipment, critical ships systems, and engines on different grids. If they are worried about the consumption of the passenger cabins "overloading" the systems, then they aren't even close! Their power consumption pales in comparison to everything else. That brings us back to the wiring of the circuits and basic electrical codes for how much each branch circuit can handle. And, as stated in my previous post, they have reduced those loads considerably the past few years. So, even if you fully loaded your power strip with the stuff you brought on board, there should be no problem at all. They only exception to that would be if you stuck several hairdryers and/or curling irons all on the same powerstrip. (breaker or powerstrip would trip anyway). As they already provide a hair dryer for each room, all they would have to do is ban bringing hair dryers on board (Ducking from the ladies!!:))

 

We'll instead of bringing our fans, we can just bring extra hair dryers and turn up the blower speed to max, but turn the heat off and whola!, we have an approved fan! All I need to do now is make a simple conical shaped diffuser to stick on the end to distribute the air flow over the same area as a small fan. Problem solved!! :):)

 

 

I agree, Chuck... it really doesn't add up but the bottom line is that SOMEONE made the pronouncement that using XXX with a power strip (John mentioned one with five outlets...) could perhaps be dangerous and hence power strips are now not permitted.

My effort in all this was to bring some level of reason to the equation so that at least the folks with medical issues (there's really quite a few...) would be exempt.

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Gosh all of these years I have been bringing a power strip to use in my stateroom. It is hard to plug in my battery charger in those sockets so the power strip comes in handy!

 

I had no idea I was breaking all kinds of rules and I have never been informed by any ships crew on Carnival or any other line that these were not allowed.

 

Is this a new thing? Why the sudden interest in banning these items? :confused:

 

I will be sure to follow the rules from now on and not take a power strip in the future. I dont want any trouble. :o

 

 

Yes... it's a kinda new thing.

I don't know why the sudden interest in the power strips and fans. It appears that it has been happening occasionally in the past. A number of members here have mentioned that a power strip was confiscated on this ship or that so it's really not new just not publicized as in this case.

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Yes... it's a kinda new thing.

 

I don't know why the sudden interest in the power strips and fans. It appears that it has been happening occasionally in the past. A number of members here have mentioned that a power strip was confiscated on this ship or that so it's really not new just not publicized as in this case.

 

As usual is a case like this, the majority is now suffering due to the actions of the minority. You know, the ones who thought they were camping, not cruising and brought coffee makers, blenders, crockpots, George Foreman grills etc on board.

 

When the pendulum swings, it has a nasty tendency to swing too hard in the other direction.

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As usual is a case like this, the majority is now suffering due to the actions of the minority. You know, the ones who thought they were camping, not cruising and brought coffee makers, blenders, crockpots, George Foreman grills etc on board.

 

When the pendulum swings, it has a nasty tendency to swing too hard in the other direction.

 

 

I couldn't have said it better myself, Don...

:)

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Thank you for the info!

 

But I have to wonder....if I put a bottle of rum in my my luggage and label it "used for medical reasons" if they'd let that pass through with no problem too! ;)

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I wonder how many "Medical Reason" tags will be applied to power strips that have nothing to do with a medical reason?

 

Let the printing presses begin...................;)

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Hey Mach, thanks for being the QB on this (as well as all questions and concerns brought up here). Just wanted to say thanks. You do a heck of a job, and we all appreciate it!:)

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Hey Mach, thanks for being the QB on this (as well as all questions and concerns brought up here). Just wanted to say thanks. You do a heck of a job, and we all appreciate it!:)

 

 

Thanks, Jim... I appreciate it...

:)

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I just received a call from Jody at Guest Services and she gave me this information

 

Battery operated Fans will be allowed. (mine came wit a AC adapter, but I didn't mention that)

Power strips and extension cords are allowed to be used with medical equipment (in my case CPAP).

And that the power strip should be packed in the CPAP carrying case and should be marked for medical use. (I don't use the bag as it is bulky but usually wrap the machine in clothing I am taking). So I will add the power strip to it too.

 

Hope this helps

and Thanks for helping get this clarified.

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Just another challenge for those clever smugglers to beat the system...

 

Now it'll be.... how to disguise the power-strip, fan, etc. as something else.

 

What about buying these taboo items at the first port of call, and put it inside of a conch or monkey head coconut, lead-lined to avoid detection:rolleyes:

 

Mike

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