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Oh dear, have you seen the doctor.;)

 

Yep, she got home last night.

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In the US, "shag" is an adjective, i.e., shag carpet. In the UK, it is a verb, meaning sex.

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In the US, "shag" is an adjective, i.e., shag carpet. In the UK, it is a verb, meaning sex.

 

It is also the name of a species of bird found around the UKs coastline, if you were on a British Isles cruise you might even see one.

 

https://www.rspb.org.uk/discoverandenjoynature/discoverandlearn/birdguide/name/s/shag/

Edited by Hatters cruiser

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As are birds from the Tit Family

 

British Garden Birds:

img-jb_great_tits.jpg

I did not know about shag birds. I did know about tit birds. I learn something new every day. Thanks for the info!

Tom:)

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Tits

 

Shags

 

And the ever present

 

Root

 

And

 

Fanny

 

No wonder I like this thread.

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Shag is, or at least was, also a tobacco.

 

So asking some girls for a bit if shag was OK, just asking for a shag may get your face slapped, or may put a smile on your face, just depends on the answer.

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Words that are words that Americans just can't say...:D

 

Bayzil. This is a green plant often used and associated with Italian dishes.

 

Toy Yoda. This is a Japanese car manufacturer.

 

Wadder. The liquid from a tap.

 

Im sure that you will have your personal observations. Its the inconsistency of the rule that I think I find most irritating, why isn't paw-sta pronounced paw-staw? Believe me, its pronounced past-ta.

 

Have fun ........;)

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To be fair, both British English and American English strangle foreign words while at the same time try to maintain the foreign pronunciation for some select words.

 

In the US you've got Chevrolet pronounced as if French yet have phonetic pronunciation of Des Moines or St Louis. What's that all about? You even get both with ''herb''. The 'h' is removed as if in French yet the vowel sound is 'uh' instead of 'air' and the 's' is sounded in the plural. Weird.

 

We have restaurant sounded with the final 't' - which is, of course, wholly not the same in the original tongue, yet we can't agree whether it's garridge or garazh for the thing we put the car away in.

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Oh, you've disappointed me about Des Moines! Ever since reading Bill Bryson's book ("I come from Des Moines... somebody had to..." ), I've pronounced it as De Mwoine, in a vaguely French way, in my head. Now you're telling me that's wrong! :eek:

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Everyone I have ever heard say Des Moines pronounces it "De Moin". I don't know where you heard that we Americans pronounce it phonetically, Tothe sunset, but you are mistaken. Maybe someone was jokingly mispronouncing it and you thought they were serious? Or you heard one particularly ignorant American pronounce it that way and you assumed we all do?

 

Also, the vowel sound in the most common American pronunciation of "herb" (as in a plant used for seasoning food, etc.) is err, or ir as in "bird", and you are correct, the h is usually silent in this word. But the "h" is pronounced in the man's name of the same spelling, Herb (same vowel sound as the plant).

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Everyone I have ever heard say Des Moines pronounces it "De Moin". I don't know where you heard that we Americans pronounce it phonetically, Tothe sunset, but you are mistaken. Maybe someone was jokingly mispronouncing it and you thought they were serious? Or you heard one particularly ignorant American pronounce it that way and you assumed we all do?

 

Also, the vowel sound in the most common American pronunciation of "herb" (as in a plant used for seasoning food, etc.) is err, or ir as in "bird", and you are correct, the h is usually silent in this word. But the "h" is pronounced in the man's name of the same spelling, Herb (same vowel sound as the plant).

OK. But do I get a point for St Louis?

Edited by Tothesunset

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How about Riz-oh-doe for Risotto. Any finger nails going down the chalk board with that one?

 

Try ordering that in Italy and they won't have a clue :p

 

Come on people, you're not even trying.

 

I will join in on the place names though. I know that place names ending in borough cause issues the world over. I was totally stumped however when I was asked for directions to Lugga-barugga by an Antipodean visitor. The place they were after was Loughborough, its pronounced Luf-bur-ra. Easy mistake! I think I will start an online petition to get it changed as it sounds much more exotic.

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Ly-ses-ter Square (Leicester Square - pronounced Lester Square) causes a scratching of heads amongst Metropolitan policemen when they are asked for directions.

 

'English' English can be bizarre - Sevenoaks (the place in Kent), is pronounced exactly as it reads - Sevenoaks (as in the Surname), is pronounced Snooks.

 

A challenge to our US cousins - how do you think the surname Featherstonehaugh is pronounced?:D

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Interesting thing about local pronunciations of place names. While, Leicester Gloucester and Edinburgh are pretty well-known irregular pronunciations how about Cowbit, Slaithwaite or Staithes which locally are pronounced something along the lines of Cubbit, Slou-it and Stee-ahs. And don't even think about having a go at Milngavie!

 

Honestly, if someone was tasked to come up with a language system designed specifically to be both infinitely expressive yet totally irregular and confusing I can't see them coming up with anything other than English (in whatever variety it manifests).

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Ly-ses-ter Square (Leicester Square - pronounced Lester Square) causes a scratching of heads amongst Metropolitan policemen when they are asked for directions.

 

'English' English can be bizarre - Sevenoaks (the place in Kent), is pronounced exactly as it reads - Sevenoaks (as in the Surname), is pronounced Snooks.

 

A challenge to our US cousins - how do you think the surname Featherstonehaugh is pronounced?:D

I'm from the UK and want to know how it's pronounced....

 

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

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OK. But do I get a point for St Louis?

 

Yes, indeed you do. Point awarded.:D There are plenty of other examples like St. Louis, as well. How about: Notre Dame (the University in Indiana, not the Cathedral in Paris) - pronounced NOtur Dame (rhymes with boater lame). A truly wince-worthy American pronunciation.:eek:

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Outside of Glasgow is a place called Milngavie ...which is pronounced Mul-guy

 

But how on Earth does one pronounce Stranraer?:o When singing along with the Proclaimers, I just can't wrap my brain or my mouth around how they seem to say that word.

 

I've even listened to this Youtube pronunciation and still can't quite figure out what my ears are hearing and how to make my tongue say it:

 

 

...So I just skip singing that word in "Cap in Hand".:o

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I'm from the UK and want to know how it's pronounced....

 

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

 

Fanshaw:eek:

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Why do the British add an "r" to Obama? r

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34311498

And add an "r" to words like Florida?

... been watching too much BBC News by Katy Kay

Must have been listening to too many posh people, I don't know anyone who adds 'r' to the end of Obama or Florida!!!!!

 

Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk

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Must have been listening to too many posh people, I don't know anyone who adds 'r' to the end of Obama or Florida!!!!!

 

Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk

 

Is it a "posh" way of speaking? An affectation? Or a way speech is taught in certain areas/ schools/ social circles/ etc.?

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Is it a "posh" way of speaking? An affectation? Or a way speech is taught in certain areas/ schools/ social circles/ etc.?

It's probably just their accent.

 

Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk

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Why do the British add an "r" to Obama? r

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34311498

And add an "r" to words like Florida?

... been watching too much BBC News by Katy Kay

They certainly don't do that round here.

 

Mind you they might well never have heard of Obama or Florida. Most of them don't even know the name of the next village!:cool:

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Don't know about Aussies, but it's not a Brit thing, it's an English one. You won't hear it north or west of the border:D

 

Good point. The first time I became aware of the phenomenon was as a child, back in the '80s, watching "General Hospital" - Aussie actor Tristan Rogers, who played Robert Scorpio, did it a lot, especially when he said "Anna" - he said it "Annar".:p

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I recently found, that the British V-sign is not for Victory or Peace.

http://www.modernhandreadingforum.com/t449-v-sign-the-good-the-bad-and-the-effect-of-middle-finger-length

I think it all depends which way round your hand is. The bad version, which is known as flicking the V's at someone, is normally done with the top of your hand facing outwards towards the person. The V for victory sign is normally done with your palm facing outwards and your other fingers and thumb folded in together.

 

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

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Good point. The first time I became aware of the phenomenon was as a child, back in the '80s, watching "General Hospital" - Aussie actor Tristan Rogers, who played Robert Scorpio, did it a lot, especially when he said "Anna" - he said it "Annar".:p

 

Some New Yorkers do the same thing. A good friend from NYC pronounces idea as "idear" and Emma as "Emmar" to name a few. And of course the infamous "youse" !!

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Some New Yorkers do the same thing. A good friend from NYC pronounces idea as "idear" and Emma as "Emmar" to name a few. And of course the infamous "youse" !!

 

Yep, I've heard those, too. "Idear" seems to be a common one.:p

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Thirty some odd years ago, when I first hired a car out of Gatwick for a month's holiday in the UK, I hit my first roundabout. I was struggling with the whole experience of driving on the left and trying to negotiate the two lane roundabout. Several other drivers flashed me the "peace sign".:D I thought it was a friendly greeting. Now I know better!!

By the way, I live in Saint "Lewis", "Mizzouree". The way we pronounce French names here (the first Europeans here were French-Canadians) would bring you to tears!!

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From another thread, titled NCL Gratuities Payments

"Can you opt out of the NCL gratuities scheme ?"

(http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2364605 )

 

Simple Definition of*scheme*

1 : a clever and often dishonest plan to do or get something

2 : an official plan or program of action

3 : the way that something is arranged or organized

 

OP is from the UK where the second definition is the most common usage of the word 'scheme'.

In the US, the first definition is more common.

Edited by $hip$hape

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