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Excellent post!

 

My favourite Australian word is "DAG" - ie "you're such a dag" or "he is so daggy" Picked that one up off "Neighbours" tv show

 

There is a song about where I live called "the crack was 90 in the Isle of Man" - i dont quite know what means?! a good time was had by all maybe, but what does the 90 mean? - I dont think anyone knows......

 

Back on topic though - The best USA/UK word difference though in my opinion is PASTIES!!! Here it is something you eat, pastry filled with meat and potato. In USA something quite different I believe!

 

 

Lol and yet a dag is something stuck to a sheep's backside.

 

Servo - was never popular in West Australia, am starting to hear it a bit more now.

 

i've never heard anyone say cobber - except on old aussie shows - just not something used much these days.

 

Have a scouser mum and she'll say aye after each sentence I say, more like 8 understand or I'm listening.

 

We found a few things 'funny' whilst in the US - here in OZ if you order something and it has a side of chips, you get french fries oven hot chips, imagine our surprise when we ordered a sandwhich and we got lays potato chips on the plate. I nearly sent Starbucks in LA into a tailspin when I asked for a white tea ( I now know I'm to ask for a hot tea with creamer), and if ordering a lemonade at Johnny Rockets, you actually get the sour glass of Lemons, not something like Sprite, so aussies wanting lemonade in US ask for Sprite or mountain dew! It was an educational experience I can tell you, which we thoroughly enjoyed.

 

I often wondered what a pocketbook was, anf always s******ed when I heard the term f@nny pack, or get off your f@nny!

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This is primarily for our US people on here. I was wondering the term 'Yanks', is that looked upon by Americans as a derogatory word ? We have friends from there and I certainly wouldn't want to upset them or anyone else for that matter by accidentally using it if it's deemed as offensive. I did ask them once about it and they didn't seem bothered but wanted to know the general concensus ?

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This is primarily for our US people on here. I was wondering the term 'Yanks', is that looked upon by Americans as a derogatory word ? We have friends from there and I certainly wouldn't want to upset them or anyone else for that matter by accidentally using it if it's deemed as offensive. I did ask them once about it and they didn't seem bothered but wanted to know the general concensus ?

 

Mostly no, it's not a problem. However if y'all refer to a southern belle as a "Yank" she might get offended, bless her heart :)

 

.... Bruce, resident in Maryland, below the Mason Dixon line, but from the frozen north where they're all "Yankees" to me, until my southern friends set me straight on it ......

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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This is primarily for our US people on here. I was wondering the term 'Yanks', is that looked upon by Americans as a derogatory word ? We have friends from there and I certainly wouldn't want to upset them or anyone else for that matter by accidentally using it if it's deemed as offensive. I did ask them once about it and they didn't seem bothered but wanted to know the general concensus ?

 

The cockney rhyming slang for Yanks IS regarded as offensive though...:eek:

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I often wondered what a pocketbook was, anf always s******ed when I heard the term f@nny pack, or get off your f@nny!

 

 

I know what you mean, I just cringe when I hear that :eek:

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This is primarily for our US people on here. I was wondering the term 'Yanks', is that looked upon by Americans as a derogatory word ? We have friends from there and I certainly wouldn't want to upset them or anyone else for that matter by accidentally using it if it's deemed as offensive. I did ask them once about it and they didn't seem bothered but wanted to know the general concensus ?

Yank ? I would not be offended in the least. Could see no difference; as if one from London was called a Brit.

Be aware... Do NOT to call a New York Mets (baseball) fan a Yank.:eek:;)

(In the movie Two Weeks Notice, Sandra Bullock and Hugh Grant's characters Lucy Kelson and George Wade attended a Mets game. When an opposing player hit a pop-fly and Mets catcher Mike Piazza went towards the stands to get it, Lucy reached over and stole the pop fly from Piazza, preventing him from getting the player out. Piazza quipped saying she should be a Yankee fan.)

IMHO, I think that would be like, a person from Ireland be offended if called a Brit?

Edited by $hip$hape

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No, as my fellow Yanks have stated, Yank is not an offensive term to us. We know Brits call us Yanks.:p It's not meant as an offensive term, and so it's not generally taken as one. Just like we say Brits, Aussies, etc. We know it's a nickname for people from the U.S.

 

Also, as the others mentioned, it is true that "Yankees" is a term used by some Southerners for Northerners and has some scorn attached to it. It goes back to the Civil War, and before. So some Southerners might not like the thought of being called "Yanks", but I would think most would be able to distinguish between the nickname for all Americans used by people from other countries and the (slightly derogatory) nickname they themselves use for their own countrymen from the North.

 

On the other hand, when Northerners call themselves Yankees, they take pride in the term and the character qualities that are associated with it.

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I often wondered what a pocketbook was, anf always s******ed when I heard the term f@nny pack, or get off your f@nny!

 

 

Using context clues I'm guessing the above "f" word means something along the lines of what Mrs. Slocombe called her cat. Am I close?

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Using context clues I'm guessing the above "f" word means something along the lines of what Mrs. Slocombe called her cat. Am I close?

 

Spot on! ;)

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What the heck is a "bum bag?" Do you mean a "fanny pack?" :-)

 

Yes. Fanny isn't a word to be used in Australia in normal conversation.

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The cockney rhyming slang for Yanks IS regarded as offensive though...:eek:

 

What you mean sceptic (as in sceptic tank) is regarded as derogatory.

I cannot imagine what you are using as rhyming slang to be considered offensive?

 

The correct spelling for nothing is not nuffin but nuffink

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Lol and yet a dag is something stuck to a sheep's backside.

 

Servo - was never popular in West Australia, am starting to hear it a bit more now.

 

i've never heard anyone say cobber - except on old aussie shows - just not something used much these days.

 

Have a scouser mum and she'll say aye after each sentence I say, more like 8 understand or I'm listening.

 

We found a few things 'funny' whilst in the US - here in OZ if you order something and it has a side of chips, you get french fries oven hot chips, imagine our surprise when we ordered a sandwhich and we got lays potato chips on the plate. I nearly sent Starbucks in LA into a tailspin when I asked for a white tea ( I now know I'm to ask for a hot tea with creamer), and if ordering a lemonade at Johnny Rockets, you actually get the sour glass of Lemons, not something like Sprite, so aussies wanting lemonade in US ask for Sprite or mountain dew! It was an educational experience I can tell you, which we thoroughly enjoyed.

 

I often wondered what a pocketbook was, anf always s******ed when I heard the term f@nny pack, or get off your f@nny!

 

Lol and yet a dag is something stuck to a sheep's backside.

Well that's educational I always thought that was a Welshman on a romantic night out.🙊🙉🙈

 

The things you learn on forums eh?

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Using context clues I'm guessing the above "f" word means something along the lines of what Mrs. Slocombe called her cat. Am I close?

 

Spot on. Jack and Danny or paper hat

 

Got nothing better to do, whilst sitting in the Singapore Airlines Lounge awaiting our flight to Brisbane.

Edited by BobnJac

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What you mean sceptic (as in sceptic tank) is regarded as derogatory.

I cannot imagine what you are using as rhyming slang to be considered offensive?

 

The correct spelling for nothing is not nuffin but nuffink

 

It is actually septic as in septic tank - yank - I think that it is regarded as derogatory because a septic tank is full of sh*t! :rolleyes:

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Rhyming slang is just rhyming and the actual words replaced don't mean anything.

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Rhyming slang is just rhyming and the actual words replaced don't mean anything.

 

I know that - you know that - some septics don't! ;)

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Yank ? I would not be offended in the least. Could see no difference; as if one from London was called a Brit.

Be aware... Do NOT to call a New York Mets (baseball) fan a Yank.:eek:;)

(In the movie Two Weeks Notice, Sandra Bullock and Hugh Grant's characters Lucy Kelson and George Wade attended a Mets game. When an opposing player hit a pop-fly and Mets catcher Mike Piazza went towards the stands to get it, Lucy reached over and stole the pop fly from Piazza, preventing him from getting the player out. Piazza quipped saying she should be a Yankee fan.)

IMHO, I think that would be like, a person from Ireland be offended if called a Brit?

 

Somewhat worse, given that Ireland isn't in Britain - calling someone from Ireland a Brit is like calling an American Canadian or Mexican...

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Somewhat worse, given that Ireland isn't in Britain - calling someone from Ireland a Brit is like calling an American Canadian or Mexican...

Exactly! That was my point. However, some Americans don't even know that Britain and Ireland are islands:eek:, yet separate.

BTW, Whilst in Brasil, a Carioca(from Rio de Janeiro) told me, "We are Americans too; South Americans."

And while we are at it, Football fans from the USA do not consider soccer as real football.(start the flames)

Edited by $hip$hape

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Exactly! That was my point. However, some Americans don't even know that Britain and Ireland are islands:eek:, yet separate.

BTW, Whilst in Brasil, a Carioca(from Rio de Janeiro) told me, "We are Americans too; South Americans."

And while we are at it, Football fans from the USA do not consider soccer as real football.(start the flames)

 

lol! that is fighting talk - there is real football then there is American football! I try not to use the s word... :)

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Having just watched England's 'performance' against Montenegro tonight, another word beginning with s springs to mind!

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Yes. Fanny isn't a word to be used in Australia in normal conversation.

 

 

Nor in the UK :o :eek:

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Soccer isn't really big here in Australia but even we get that football is soccer.

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Somewhat worse, given that Ireland isn't in Britain - calling someone from Ireland a Brit is like calling an American Canadian or Mexican...

Hi

When my grandfather left Ireland in 1905, Ireland was still part of Britain. He never got over his anger at the way he and his family were treated by the British. I'm pretty sure that he would have objected to being called British. None of my Keating Irish cousins are angry at Britain anymore, but they still want to be identified as Irish.

Tom:)

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Hi

None of my Keating Irish cousins are angry at Britain anymore, but they still want to be identified as Irish.

Tom:)

 

I am not surprised at all. Cultural identity is something nearly everybody hangs on to. Especially if there are good reasons to set oneself apart from others, like the conflicts between English and Irish... If I was from Ireland I would definitely insits on being refererred to as an Irishman.

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