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Dress Code

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I loved seeing DH when he would wear a Tux, now he also wears a coat and tie as you described. With airlines now charging for bags, it is so much more annoying to need to pack little used clothing for a trip. Yes, we travel business class and are allowed more bags, but if you are going to visit a country before or after your cruise it can be cumbersome with too many bags. Point in fact, visiting friends in the UK last summer their small car would not have taken so many bags. That said, we will be on Seaborn this February for a cruise to Antartica, my sister in-law and I have been wondering if we will need more that one 25" bag pp because of the cold weather gear. Since we are spending only one extra night in Chili before the cruise we may end up with extra bags. 

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I think they give you heavy jackets, and maybe gloves. They gave us great jackets on the Alaska cruise. You might be able to lighten your load that way. 

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Dress code appears to have been addressed on Ovation. We were seeing gentlemen in the MDR at dinner wearing shorts and a gym/runners type vest (sleeveless top, aka singlet).  Haven't seen similar since the first couple of nights. 

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But surely they should not have been allowed in the MDR in the first place?  I don't know if on Ovation there is a back way into the dining room, as on the Odyssey class, when we have known people sneak in in the wrong clothes, and just go and sit at a table of their choice!  I think they have 'waiter police'  stationed there nowadays.

 

Looking forward to your final opinions on this cruise when you have time, Isklaar.

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12 hours ago, lincslady said:

But surely they should not have been allowed in the MDR in the first place?  I don't know if on Ovation there is a back way into the dining room, as on the Odyssey class, when we have known people sneak in in the wrong clothes, and just go and sit at a table of their choice!  I think they have 'waiter police'  stationed there nowadays.

 

Looking forward to your final opinions on this cruise when you have time, Isklaar.

 

They shouldn't have been allowed in, but you are right, there is a way to get in on Ovation just like the Odyssey class ships. Not sure about 'waiter police there though, I will have a look for them tonight! 

 

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On 12/23/2018 at 2:56 PM, HappyFeet13 said:

No doubt there has been a lot of slippage in dress codes since I first sailed on Seabourn 18 years ago. We will go on our 10th Seabourn cruise this April, our first repositioning trip, Barbados to Lisbon. We have always travelled to other places for a couple of weeks before or after our cruise, and carrying  formal attire was always a burden. Traveling for a month , with formal attire to be used once or twice seemed silly, but we always did it. But on our last two cruises (32 days NZ to Bali,  and then 14 days in Alaska) I actually counted the men in tuxedos in the dining room. It was never more than 30%!  I was among the minority. The problem is that if you DO wear a tux, you're likely to be seated at a table where no one else, or one other guy, is. That happened at all four of the black-tie dinners on the 32 day cruise. I looked and felt silly...overdressed.  So, the next trip, my wife will wear cocktail attire and I will wear a dark blue blazer, dark slacks, white shirt with cufflinks, and a dark tie. I liked the old days when everyone dressed appropriately for a black tie event, but when they made it "optional", the wheels came off. Those glamorous old days are, sadly,  gone. 

Sadly those days are way gone. I remember dressing up for airline travel and not even in first class.  Recently we were in F class on Emirates to Johannesburg via Dubai and very costly and most people were in jeans or sports suits.  Times have changed.

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On 12/23/2018 at 12:34 AM, Isklaar said:

I'm on Ovation right now,seems there is no dress code on this ship! 

 

Just came off the Quest following the first Antarctic cruise of the season. The dress code was not enforced. Jeans n sneakers in the restaurant, jeans in Thomas Keller. Why bother having a no jeans after 6.30pm policy if it’s not enforced. Also, a smack in the face for those who have spent money on clothing to abide by the code.

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5 hours ago, Hign n Dry said:

 

Just came off the Quest following the first Antarctic cruise of the season. The dress code was not enforced. Jeans n sneakers in the restaurant, jeans in Thomas Keller. Why bother having a no jeans after 6.30pm policy if it’s not enforced. Also, a smack in the face for those who have spent money on clothing to abide by the code.

We sail on February 24, I wonder if people were so casual because of the Antartica cruise. Good way to stay warm? We were on the Quest last July/August and people did dress up in the evenings.

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On 12/26/2018 at 3:45 AM, lincslady said:

I think they have 'waiter police'  stationed there nowadays.

 

Good to see cruise fares well spent. What a world...

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We sailed on the Ovation last June and everyone dressed according to the dress code. In fact, many were quite dressed up in the MDR while others were more casually dressed, but none in jeans.  

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Is there a way to know which nights have been designated Formal Optional on an upcoming cruise prior to embarkation?

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We have found on past Seabourn cruises that the 2nd night is usually the Captains Reception, which is the black tie optional night. Then about one a week. 

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Yes to both of the last posts with caveats. I believe the actual nights are chosen by the on-board crew, especially if the 1st and 2nd days are sea days.  Usually - if a long enough cruise - the 2nd to last night is formal night.  For longer cruises, especially if over a holiday, e.g. Christmas / New Years they time it to coincide with the holiday.  Your mileage may vary 🙂

 

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Just came off the Quest following the first Antarctic cruise of the season. The dress code was not enforced. Jeans n sneakers in the restaurant, jeans in Thomas Keller. Why bother having a no jeans after 6.30pm policy if it’s not enforced. Also, a smack in the face for those who have spent money on clothing to abide by the code.

You erroneously assume that jeans are not pricey. I have jeans than cost substantially more than the gowns I own - or rather, owned; I’ve donated most of my formal attire as I simply do not enjoy dressing “up” as much as I did years ago.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I do think jeans have their place, I for one live in mine, haha. That said, we should respect others and abide by the dress code in the MDR. I will be going on the Quest in February and I wonder if the dressing down is because this cruise is in the Antarctic and people are trying to stay warm. I was on the Quest last summer and did  not notice people  wearing jeans in the MDR.

 

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I too will be on the Antarctica cruise in Feb. Jeans have never been a go to option for me as they provide very little warmth. I will probably pack a pair but casual day wear for the Antarctic part of the cruise  will be heavier fabric  slacks. It is a bit difficult to choose clothing as we go from Antarctic cold to Amazon heat and gumidity. Looking forward to meeting you onboard. 

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25 minutes ago, Deeacof said:

I too will be on the Antarctica cruise in Feb. Jeans have never been a go to option for me as they provide very little warmth. I will probably pack a pair but casual day wear for the Antarctic part of the cruise  will be heavier fabric  slacks. It is a bit difficult to choose clothing as we go from Antarctic cold to Amazon heat and gumidity. Looking forward to meeting you onboard. 

 

Very wise comment about Jeans in cold climates.  To quote eDocAmerica:

 

"“Cotton kills”  
cotton-kills-and-other-cold-weather-clothing-wisdomWhile this saying is somewhat of an exaggeration, cotton clothing ranks at the bottom of the list of appropriate fabrics for cold weather active wear.  With outdoor activity, perspiration is absorbed into cotton layers that are touching or near the skin. As the air pockets in the fabric fill up with water, it ceases to provide insulation. A damp layer of clothing against the skin pulls heat away from the body and can rapidly lower body temperature. Furthermore, wet, cotton clothing takes much longer to dry than comparably weighted synthetic fabrics.  Garments labeled as corduroy, denim, flannel, or duck are mostly, or entirely, made from cotton. Clothing made from synthetic fabrics or wool is more appropriate, particularly during physical activity in the cold."

 

Cotton can absorb 26 times its own weight in water. 

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After reading this thread, and reading the various blogs as to what actually happens on the Seabourn Antarctic cruises, I've decided I just won't eat in the MDR at all while in South Georgia or the Antarctic this December.  I'm on that cruise to see things I will never get a chance to see again.  Not to dress up for dinner.  At least in the Colonnade I can wear (I assume) fleece-lined booties and thermal slax, allowing me to be out on deck before and after eating without running back to the cabin to change out of the "acceptable attire and footwear"

 

While I will respect the dresscode, I will also go on record as saying I think it's utterly ludicrous while in the Antarctic, and I wish Seabourn would suspend the dress code while on that portion of the cruise, and enforce it the rest of the voyage.

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Regarding jeans in the evenings- it does seem to be BLUE jeans which are deemed unacceptable, I have worn what I consider jeans ( pockets in the back, belt loops, fairly heavy denim type fabric) in the evenings in white and black, admittedly with a top over them which hides the waistband and belt, and  never had a problem.  I suspect it is just any shade of blue which alerts  the dress police

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I wholeheartedly agree to respect the code in the MDR. I don’t dine in the MDR when I do. (Except once when I changed plans last minute.). That said, the last two SB cruises I was on, I opted for dining mostly al fresco and in the Colonnade, both of which allowed jeans. Because I work, I don’t have the luxury of living in my jeans, and so I enjoy my time in jeans on vacations.

 

 

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Nice to see that Seabourn has come to a point where tuxedos are less common and more casual attire has been accepted in the restaurants. It is 2019.  Just returned from a cruise.  Amazed at how casual attire is the choice of many cruisers. Guys in tuxedos were few.  There were few gowns.  They looked old and out of style.  The dress guide becomes what people wear. It seems that women can wear almost anything. Most people dress casually and conservatively. They look smart and look comfortable. No more formal attire.  I donated our formal wear to goodwill. 

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19 hours ago, lincslady said:

Regarding jeans in the evenings- it does seem to be BLUE jeans which are deemed unacceptable, I have worn what I consider jeans ( pockets in the back, belt loops, fairly heavy denim type fabric) in the evenings in white and black, admittedly with a top over them which hides the waistband and belt, and  never had a problem.  I suspect it is just any shade of blue which alerts  the dress police

Yes, you may be right about Blue jeans. Have worn white jeans as well and as you said a long top hides the pockets and belt loops. I keep wondering if white pants will work at night on the Antartica trip? It is summer after all...

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11 hours ago, Redtravel said:

Nice to see that Seabourn has come to a point where tuxedos are less common and more casual attire has been accepted in the restaurants. It is 2019.  Just returned from a cruise.  Amazed at how casual attire is the choice of many cruisers. Guys in tuxedos were few.  There were few gowns.  They looked old and out of style.  The dress guide becomes what people wear. It seems that women can wear almost anything. Most people dress casually and conservatively. They look smart and look comfortable. No more formal attire.  I donated our formal wear to goodwill. 

Yep, my DH is glad tuxedos are BTO now. He hates even having to pack extra shoes that go with the tux. I am glad that we do not have to pack long fancy gowns either. I suspect what you thought were old and out of style is because ladies don't want the hassle and expense of buying a "new" dress for each cruise. We are just a more casual society now, that said, some people love the chance to dress up a little, more power to them.

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