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CoachTerry14

Hurricane Irene

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It ought to weaken going north into cooler waters hopefully it'll continue to incrementally track east.

 

A category one storm coming ashore - generally - will not cause terrible headaches a mile or so inland - generally (rains nothwithstanding). A category one storm is a hurricane for sure - but the danger level is not especially high.

 

UT Bos - you have a lot of studious curiosity and spirit! Good for you; on a cruise ship, you'll be safe. But at a certain point a hurricane really... ain't fun. We were on the lucky lee side of Charly (about 10 miles off) the eye in '04. No one to speak of locally had direct experience with bad storms at that point. The physicians at then Fawcett Memorial Hospital in Port Charlotte had a fancy little weather station on the roof of the hospital with wind guage recordings sent downstairs etc. They took a direct hit. Later, the insurance industry - NOAA - local authorities all got into an aggenda driven debate over storm categories and Clintonesque definitions of "sustained" winds (with Charly eventually 'downgraded' to cat 3). That did not change the indisputable fact that the hospital's wind guage max pegged at 200 mph then died when the top floor and a half of the hospital disintegrated. That was a mid-rise building of structural steel. Just remember: barking at a storm won't keep a shard of glass from going through your throat. A storm is a bad way to end a 'bucket list'.

 

 

IYNHO. I never said it was how I wanted to end my bucket list.

 

By the way Charlie is also an example of how locals do not pay enough attention to the potentials of a storm. At the time Charlie was forecast to head up the coast and tag Tampa. Many in Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda did not evacuate on the assumption that a lesser storm was going to skirt by them on its way north. I watched the progress of Charlie and was horrified as it veered left and went through a rapid intensification . It made landfall with an estimated 125 kts, 145mph+. I have no doubt it may have had gusts much stronger, and it is not uncommon to find tornado like vorticity in the eye wall, as in Andrew.

 

The dangers inherent in living in a coastal Floridian community cannot be understated. No one who understands the reality that these storms can serve up would think the experience was going to be fun. I'd suggest that that tag not be pinned on this donkey.

 

“No one to speak of locally had direct experience with bad storms at that point.”

Do you mean to say that all those individuals did not know the risk and life threatening danger they were taking by choosing to live there? Does this negate the fact that even basic understanding of wind energy makes mobile homes unsuitable for sitting out a hurricane. Low lying property, structurally unsound dwellings, are death traps in a major hurricane.

 

Personally, this bucket list guy, would never face a storm in such locations. I may want the experience, but I'm no fool.

 

Millions of folk lacking in direct experience are at risk, and may pay with their lives. For the most part, they should know better. This is not limited to Florida, but there are some locations along your coast that are future Charlies waiting to happen. There is a Cat5 waiting in Florida's future, perhaps hitting Tampa or the panhandle.

 

How much has your area learned? Have building codes changed enough, are mobile homes still a dominant part of the housing stock, will at risk residents evacuate on the threat and not wait until it is too late?

 

If you do not want to experience the life threatening hurricanes that will hit Florida, then you should not be living there. If a 4 foot snow fall, or a two inch ice storm is more than you can handle, don't live in New England

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Just because you live a few miles inland doesn't mean that you will not feel a significant impact. As the remnants of Isabel came through Springfield Virginia in 2003 we were well inland; probably 70+ miles from where the storm came ashore. We lost water for about 36 hours, and power for about 2 days. The howling winds kept us up most of the night. We had failed to fill up our bathtubs with water before the storm hit, so flushing the toilet, washing, etc. were a bit limited.

 

Our neighbor's finished basement was partially flooded because they lost power to thier sump pump. We saw them coming out of their basement with buckets of water during the storm. They were bailing out thier sump pump's well by hand. Fortunately our home was on a hill and had good drainage without the sump pump.

 

We never felt like we weer in danger, but I would not want to go through it again.

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I think I would enjoy sailing through a hurricane. Then again, I have an "odd" side to me. I live in Southern NJ, an hour from the beach and I'm thinking of driving down to watch. When the last hurricane skirted our shores, 2006...I forget the name, I was going down for it, but a boat got knocked off of its moorings and hit the 9th Street Bridge in Ocean City and there was concern that it was damaged. It reopened just after the hurricane passed and I went down to watch the aftermath. It was an amazing sight to see.

 

Odds are, I won't be allowed in and that's probably for the better.

 

My best wishes to anyone who has been affected, is being affected or will be affected by Irene.

 

 

Bart

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I live in Louisville Ky...Tornado's we're use to, but not hurricanes...However, in 08 we got the winds from "IKE", as it came up from the gulf, and it basically shut the place down...Tree's and power lines down all over...Schools closed for a week...It made me really appreciate what a force of nature a hurricane could be even when you don't live anywhere remotely close to a coastline.

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Sailing out of Brooklyn, NY on Saturday to Canada and New England. Do you see Princess changing its Itinerary? The cone seems to be over my entire cruise. I am also a bit concerned about parking my car at the Brooklyn Pier in case there is a storm surge there.

 

We are literally in the same boat as you. Planned on driving to NYC and parking at the cruise port. The mayor has declared evacuation for that area so we are staying home. Don't want to sail back into NYC past our car floating down the East River. Plus who wants a tour of east coast disaster areas? We are most interested in hearing from other passengers with the same problem. Looks likely that passengers arriving by air will have their flights cancelled.

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We are literally in the same boat as you. Planned on driving to NYC and parking at the cruise port. The mayor has declared evacuation for that area so we are staying home. Don't want to sail back into NYC past our car floating down the East River. Plus who wants a tour of east coast disaster areas? We are most interested in hearing from other passengers with the same problem. Looks likely that passengers arriving by air will have their flights cancelled.

 

Actually the Carribean Princess itinerary should be ok. The ship leaves at least 24 hours before the storm arrives, Sunday, while Irene goes through NY, we'll be at sea well East of the storm. By Monday, we'll be in Halifax, and the storm will be well West of Nova Scotia, Halifax is not even in the cone of uncertainty. By Monday night the storm will be gone/or a non entity, and the rest of the itinerary will be Sunny and Warm! We should be ok. I just changed the flight to NY from Saturday morning to Friday afternoon to avoid delays and cancellations, and running the risk of missing the ship and being stuck in NY.

NK

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We are literally in the same boat as you. Planned on driving to NYC and parking at the cruise port. The mayor has declared evacuation for that area so we are staying home. Don't want to sail back into NYC past our car floating down the East River. Plus who wants a tour of east coast disaster areas? We are most interested in hearing from other passengers with the same problem. Looks likely that passengers arriving by air will have their flights cancelled.

 

I wouldn't cancel the cruise, (unless you have a suite booked:D) just don't drive to the port, I am taking a car service

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We are taking the Carnival Glory tomorrow. The ship reversed ports and we will stop in Halifax on Monday. Hopefully the ship will be in front of Irene

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We are taking the Carnival Glory tomorrow. The ship reversed ports and we will stop in Halifax on Monday. Hopefully the ship will be in front of Irene

 

No Captain of any ship will put you in harm's way. They always find a way to traverse a hurricane.

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IYNHO. I never said it was how I wanted to end my bucket list.

 

By the way Charlie is also an example of how locals do not pay enough attention to the potentials of a storm. At the time Charlie was forecast to head up the coast and tag Tampa. Many in Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda did not evacuate on the assumption that a lesser storm was going to skirt by them on its way north.

 

Sorry Bostonian - if you have serious storms on your 'bucket list' then you're contradicting yourself. If sensible behavior is to evacuate then you erase it from your bucket list. My point was that prior to 2004 - on the gulf coast there'd been no major hurricane since Donna in the early '60's so there was very little personal memory of the reality of a dangerous sea storm in this topography.

 

Andrew was a very compact storm that came ashore in a relatively unpopulated area despite its proximity to Miami. Florida has unusual geography. In an era of doppler radar, beacons, etc. where else in the USA can a major airliner go down over land less than 15 miles from the runway of a major international airport - and they can't find the thing for 2+ days!?

 

I watched the progress of Charlie and was horrified as it veered left and went through a rapid intensification . It made landfall with an estimated 125 kts, 145mph+. I have no doubt it may have had gusts much stronger, and it is not uncommon to find tornado like vorticity in the eye wall, as in Andrew.

 

As a matter of fact, Charly was a bit unusual in that it threw off 6-12 tornados around its eye wall (which was what the Feds deemed hit the hospital) then it almost 'consciously' eerily followed the Peace River inland which helped it retain its force well into the interior. Fortunately, it moved very fast about 35 mph so it blew through fast. It would've been a horror show if it had stalled.

 

How much has your area learned? Have building codes changed enough, are mobile homes still a dominant part of the housing stock, will at risk residents evacuate on the threat and not wait until it is too late?

 

Mobile homes have never been a 'dominant' part of the housing stock here, but for the reasons you point out they attract a lot of media. There are many though and on the water. Getting one permitted for development has been nearly impossible for decades because of their vulnerability. But they attract seniors that can be hard to budge!

 

In the days following Charly, driving through Port Charlotte and Punta Gorda, you could determine age of construction based on damage levels (Pre-Andrew/Post-Andrew). Newer post-Andrew construction (code revisions followed) actually held up pretty well. Naturally, codes have been revised again based on lessons learned. Some 'dismal economists' would say a major storm provides a positive benefit in 'cleaning out' substandard housing. In the context of codes and land development though it was interesting looking at commercial properties where developers had been required to oddly configure parking areas etc. to accomodate and preserve 'heritage trees' (generally 20+ inches); yep, they were snapped like matchsticks!

 

If you do not want to experience the life threatening hurricanes that will hit Florida, then you should not be living there. If a 4 foot snow fall, or a two inch ice storm is more than you can handle, don't live in New England

 

Don't get me started! In the Arve valley in France (Chamonix) Jan.-March '78, I was amazed at how much acreage and board feet of heritage timber ended up in the valley floor due to avalanche. Heritage trees piled up and scattered like pick up sticks (you wouldn't want to be under!); really heavy equipment needed to clear the valley road. To a 'snow slide' what a bad hurricane is to a storm. But it wouldn't keep me from wanting to spend a winter there! Ski heil Bostonian!:)

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This posted by John Heald on FB:

 

Given the projected path of Hurricane Irene, Carnival Glory will now depart New York at approximately 3 pm on Saturday, August, 27, two hours ahead of schedule, in advance of the storm. Guests can arrive at the pier as early as 10 a.m. to begin embarkation. Saturday’s departure is a five-day eastern Canada cruise to Halifax and Saint John. ..................please can someone post on Cruise Critic

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NCL posted this about their ships this weekend.

 

Dear all,

Below is our updated statement as of 2 pm today. Please note change to Norwegian Gem's arrival.

Thank you,

Norwegian Cruise Line Public Relations

 

Hurricane Irene Update # 4

August 26, 2011, 2 pm ET

 

At Norwegian Cruise Line, the safety and security of our guests and crew is of the utmost importance. Therefore, the company continues to closely monitor the path of Hurricane Irene which is currently forecasted to impact the New York area late Saturday and Sunday. Because of the storm, we are modifying the following itineraries:

 

Norwegian Jewel will return to New York early on Saturday, August 27 and guests currently on board will disembark beginning at 6 am. Embarkation for the August 27 cruise will commence earlier beginning at 10 am. The ship will depart three hours earlier than scheduled at 1 pm. All guests are advised to arrive at the pier between 10 am and noon. Once the ship is underway, there may be a change to the scheduled Bahamas & Florida itinerary.

 

Norwegian Gem will remain at sea, keeping a safe distance from the storm, on Sunday, August 28 instead of returning to New York as scheduled. The ship will arrive in New York at 8 am on Monday, August 29. All guests for the August 28 cruise are asked to arrive at the pier on Monday, August 29 beginning at noon. The ship is scheduled to depart New York at 4 pm on Monday en route to Bermuda.

 

Norwegian Dawn is sailing from Boston to Bermuda today as scheduled.

 

Norwegian Sky is sailing from Miami today as scheduled. The ship will spend a day at sea on Saturday, August 27 instead of calling at Great Strirrup Cay, Bahamas. The ship will visit Nassau as scheduled on Sunday, August 28.

 

Guests on board the vessels will be kept up to date by the ship’s Captain. It is also important to note that we will continue to closely monitor the storm and if the path changes, we may need to modify these itineraries.

 

We appreciate our guests’ understanding. If there are any further changes, we will update this site. Thank you.

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I just heard that all public transportation in Manhatten is shutting down at noon on Sat. Hope no one is stranded!

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Pam -

 

We have a wedding in Boston on Sat. Lets hope all goes well.;)

 

Sorry, was reading this forum and your quote here grabbed me .. My husband is a videographer and shooting Saturday around Logan. I'm hoping he's home before the big stuff hits here (southern NH).

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11:40 pm est in Western Camden County, South Jersey and the preliminary round of Hurricane Irene is over. Tons of rain, some wind (between 30 and 50 mph and tornado warnings all over southern and central NJ. The finals start sometime soon. :)

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It is 6:22am, and the Carnival Glory is at 40.28n, 69.02w, or about 30 miles southeast of Cape Cod. We have travelled 212 miles since leaving New York City yesterday afternoon.

 

Overall, we're doing well. The boat is rocking gently to moderately, with frequent small shudders. I'd say the maximum roll is about 4 degrees. Nothing is rolling around the cabin.

 

The wind is howling outside, in light rain. The sea state is "confused" with many whitecaps,but I can't estimate the wave height. I can see from the bow cam that the ship is pitching about 5 degrees, but can't feel it in the cabin.

 

The wireless internet is working very well. Of course I'm typing this offline and will log back on to post.

 

Despite all of us taking Dramamine, two of our group are having "issues", the rest are fine but all asleep.

 

We arrived at the terminal at 9am yesterday, as instructed, and apparently everyone got thememo because it was jammed. We were quickly processed, but then had to wait until 11:00am for boarding. Lots of people getting on and off a number of ships. It wasn't an unpleasant wait, the kids had toys and games. We got onboat around 11:15am and immediately hit the Lido deck.

 

The ship sailed at about 3:30pm, with no announcements, it just suddenly left. The wind was just starting to build, but the rain had mercifully stopped so we could enjoy the sailaway from the deck. It was warm and muggy, with lots of dark clouds, but no real weather.

 

We did the lifeboat drill as we passed under the Verrezano, but no one complained. It was impressive to watch about six ships all leave NYC at once, three from Manhattan, a Princess from Brooklyn and a Celebrity and another ship from New Jersey. Earlier, we had watched a steady parade of mega-yachts and large sailboats motoring quickly north on the Hudson, headed for Albany or as far north as they could get.

 

The kids were very excited, and there were lots of plans made, but in the end all just ate pizza and other snacks in the room, and went to bed around 8-9pm. Only two of us went to the main dining room, which was only about 30% full. We had no problems with dinner.

 

We all went to bed at 10pm to increased rolling.

 

Lots of discussions on the ship about the motion, and some concerned looking passengers. I'm not sure what they expected! I've been on North Sea ferries in larger waves, where everything in the cabin was flying around until it found a home under the sofa. So far this hasn't been bad at all.

 

It looks like the storm is making landfall again in Northern NJ, more or less a direct hit on NYC. We're about 200 miles east of the eye, and adding 20 more each hour. I think this is probably about the worst of it, and hopefully we'll be in clearer air and seas by midday. And hopefully our group and the rest of the ship will get their sea legs and resume having fun.

 

I won't be logging on often, so won't be able to answer questions immediately, but will file another report later today.

 

Brian, Kathryn and the Wobbles

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My sincere thanks for your report. It is fantastic that you are able to inform us immediately. Thats great! I wish you a wonderful and especially quiet cruise.

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Oh, I feel for all of you who have cruises affected by the hurricane. It must be rough wondering if sailing time will be moved up, where to park, etc. Hoping all goes well and everyone is able to make it to their cruise ship. Hope there aren't any hurricanes when we sail out of FLL at the end of October!

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Oh, I feel for all of you who have cruises affected by the hurricane. It must be rough wondering if sailing time will be moved up, where to park, etc. Hoping all goes well and everyone is able to make it to their cruise ship. Hope there aren't any hurricanes when we sail out of FLL at the end of October!

 

I'll be in Europe, but before I leave I'll be sure to advise the powers that be that no hurricanes dare come to FT Lauderdale. :D October is not the month for hurricanes, though Wilma, the last biggie, did in fact arrive at the end of October in 2005.

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It is 2:30pm Sunday, and the Carnival Glory is at 40" 15' N, 66" 39' W, roughly 100 miles southeast of Cape Cod.

 

All is well on board, but it is, uh, interesting. When we woke this morning, the boat was rolling significantly, but there was very little pitch (nose up and down motion). At some point today, the captain would need to turn about 20 degrees left to head for Halifax. However, that would have put us directly abeam the waves, with significantly increased roll.

 

So instead, the captain turned 20 degrees RIGHT, to a heading of 120 degrees, causing us to head almost 90 degrees to the right of Halifax, and slowed the boat to about 12 knots. This put us directly into the swells, so we had almost no roll, but significant pitch, I'd guess about 10 degrees of pitch. Looking forward or aft, it was quite dramatic, but was much easier to walk or do dining-type things than with the roll.

 

I'm assuming that sometime tonight, he'll turn 90 degrees left and gun it for Halifax. In the meantime, Carnival is spending quite a bit extra on fuel to keep us comfortable.

 

The lower Lido deck areas are open, with strong winds, I'd guess 25 knots plus 10 knots of boat speed for a total of 35 knots. Hair, clothes and just about everything else is blowing like crazy. It is not raining, though, and is just partly cloudy with some sun. The upper outside decks are all closed off

 

People are out and about, it is warm and people are using the deck chairs and the pools. The bars are doing good business. At breakfast there were several loud crashes of waiter-carried meals, at lunch we heard one. People are still commenting and/or complaining about the motion, but it is not really uncomfortable. We still have one member down with seasickness (enough to get him banned from Camp Carnival for a while), otherwise we are up, about, and eating.

 

It looks like the rain has moved north from New York City, but we can't seem to get any good reports about damage, the news channels are pretty useless at this point, other than reporting millions of power outages. I guess in a few days we'll have a better idea of the shoreside damage.

 

In the meantime, we're looking forward to the formal dinner this evening, and arriving in Halifax tomorrow. By the time we leave Halifax monday night, the seas should have died down considerably.

 

So we're doing fine and glad to be here. I hope for the best for all back on shore.

Brian, Kathryn and the Wobbles

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4:15pm on Sunday. The Carnival Glory is at 40" 12'N, 66" 13W. We have made the 90 degree turn left to a heading of 23 degrees, directly toward Halifax, but still at reduced speed of 12 knots.

 

The captain has just announced that while the sea has abated slightly, he will continue at reduced speed, reaching Halifax at 4pm Monday afternoon. We will remain overnight at Halifax, then leave at 6pm on Tuesday, and return directly to New York, skipping Saint John.

 

We are disappointed, of course. I love the reversing falls, and had planned to take the jetboat ride for the first time. But the captain's path and speed has significantly reduced the motion of the ship, and we will spend a quiet night at the dock in Halifax, which will increase the enjoyment of the passengers that are not handling the motion well.

 

Brian, Kathryn and the Wobbles

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We lived. The finals were basically a dud, which is probably a good thing. At about 2am, I fell asleep even though I said to myself that if I fell asleep prior to the eye passing and the worst part of the hurricane on deck and tornado warnings all around us, I'd wake up dead. I woke up alive.

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