Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
Johnny B

John and Diane's Amazing Adventure - Part III

Recommended Posts

Thank you for the fabulous posts!!! I may have missed it, but has there been any "cork forking" at the dinner table? Cherie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 20 – Day 15

Rio de Janeiro

 

As Ellen, our tour escort said, Rio really is one of the most naturally beautiful cities in the world. Or at least that’s what I think. Today we took our second half-day tour. Yesterday’s half-day tour ended at 2:45; today’s tour was supposed to end at 12:30 but we got back to the ship at nearly 2:00 and it was worth every minute.

 

We began the morning with a drive to Corcovado, where we took a cute little cog railway up the mountain. The railway is made by the same Swiss company which manufactures the cars which have taken us up the Jungfrau with students many times. I don’t much like heights, but if the Swiss make it, I feel a lot better. The rail trip was through a lush rainforest, but even though we looked, we couldn’t see any monkeys.

 

At the top, we had a choice of waiting nearly a half hour to take an elevator up to the next level or walking up about 50 stairs with a beautiful view. Gosh, that was tough! I can understand people who really have trouble walking needing the lift, but the line extended back about 40 feet and was full of perfectly able-bodied people. Oh well.

 

At the next level, they had escalators! I was amazed, but there they were, taking us to the highest level, right under the statue. It is truly an amazing experience. Christ the Redeemer is very simple in its magnificence, and I could have stood there and watched for a very long time. One thing that I noticed that I had never seen in a photo was that there’s a heart right in the middle of his chest. It’s a nice touch. It seemed that the (slightly tacky) thing to do was to have friends take your picture with your arms straight out so that the statue is right behind you. We passed on that one.

 

From Corcovado we proceeded by way of one of the city’s well-known favelas, or slums, to one of Rio’s beautiful beaches, (probably Leblon) where we got off the bus for a complimentary

coconut with a straw. We took a sip of a friend’s “coconut water” and then decided to share the Brazilian national drink, which consists of sugar macerated into limes, a lot of rum poured in, ice added and then the whole thing shaken and poured into a new glass. It was soooo much better than coconut milk!

 

Because today was a holiday in Rio, celebrating St. Sebastian, the patron saint of the city, the beaches were packed. It was nearly 90 degrees, and the estimate was that there were nearly a half million people on Ipanema Beach, not even including Copacabana.

 

It was a great day, and sailaway was the best attended so far. It was absolutely gorgeous sailing out of the bay and into the Atlantic. I don’t want to come for Carnivale or the World Cup or the Olympics because of the crowds, but I would like to return to Rio someday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
January 20 – Day 15

Rio de Janeiro

 

As Ellen, our tour escort said, Rio really is one of the most naturally beautiful cities in the world. Or at least that’s what I think. Today we took our second half-day tour. Yesterday’s half-day tour ended at 2:45; today’s tour was supposed to end at 12:30 but we got back to the ship at nearly 2:00 and it was worth every minute.

 

We began the morning with a drive to Corcovado, where we took a cute little cog railway up the mountain. The railway is made by the same Swiss company which manufactures the cars which have taken us up the Jungfrau with students many times. I don’t much like heights, but if the Swiss make it, I feel a lot better. The rail trip was through a lush rainforest, but even though we looked, we couldn’t see any monkeys.

 

At the top, we had a choice of waiting nearly a half hour to take an elevator up to the next level or walking up about 50 stairs with a beautiful view. Gosh, that was tough! I can understand people who really have trouble walking needing the lift, but the line extended back about 40 feet and was full of perfectly able-bodied people. Oh well.

 

At the next level, they had escalators! I was amazed, but there they were, taking us to the highest level, right under the statue. It is truly an amazing experience. Christ the Redeemer is very simple in its magnificence, and I could have stood there and watched for a very long time. One thing that I noticed that I had never seen in a photo was that there’s a heart right in the middle of his chest. It’s a nice touch. It seemed that the (slightly tacky) thing to do was to have friends take your picture with your arms straight out so that the statue is right behind you. We passed on that one.

 

From Corcovado we proceeded by way of one of the city’s well-known favelas, or slums, to one of Rio’s beautiful beaches, (probably Leblon) where we got off the bus for a complimentary

coconut with a straw. We took a sip of a friend’s “coconut water” and then decided to share the Brazilian national drink, which consists of sugar macerated into limes, a lot of rum poured in, ice added and then the whole thing shaken and poured into a new glass. It was soooo much better than coconut milk!

 

Because today was a holiday in Rio, celebrating St. Sebastian, the patron saint of the city, the beaches were packed. It was nearly 90 degrees, and the estimate was that there were nearly a half million people on Ipanema Beach, not even including Copacabana.

 

It was a great day, and sailaway was the best attended so far. It was absolutely gorgeous sailing out of the bay and into the Atlantic. I don’t want to come for Carnivale or the World Cup or the Olympics because of the crowds, but I would like to return to Rio someday.

 

 

Hi John and Diane

 

Have just discovered your blog and will be following you as we are doing "The Horn" in Jan 2013. If you see a couple of Aussies named Mike and Narelle say "hello" for us. Keep on posting as we find it fascinating.

Lorraine & Ian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the view from Corcovado has to be one of the most stunning in the world, with bodies of water and hills extending in *all* directions.

 

Thanks for sharing your wonderful world cruise with us!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 23 – Day 18

Buenos Aires

 

Rio is such a beautiful city, and we loved visiting Sugar Loaf Mountain and Corcovado with its Christ of the Andes, but if we had to choose a place to live, I think it would be Buenos Aires. It is more like a European city, and the strong middle class makes it very attractive. I even like the fact that all the streets of the city run in parallel and perpendicular lines.

 

Two years ago was our first visit here on the 2010 WC, and we found a wonderful little tour company called Buenostours.com, founded by an Englishman and specializing in walking tours of the city. You pay a set fee, usually about $150, and the tour is for 4-7 people, so the more people who join in, the less the individual price. Last time, our guide Jessica took 5 of us on a walking tour of the center of BA, seeing the Plaza de Mayo (pronounced Majo), Evita’s balcony, Café Tortoni, the hundred-year-old subway cars, and lots of other things.

 

This time, we decided on a walking tour of Recoleto Cemetery, final (so far) resting place of Eva Peron and thousands of other people. Our merry group of 6 began in the Retiro district, home of beautiful hundred year old French-inspired mansions and a lovely shopping street called Florida. We saw the top hotels, most of which have taken over the aforementioned mansions and are really quite beautiful, not to mention expensive.

 

After a stop for coffee at a beautiful little café, we headed across the street to the four square blocks of Recoleta Cemetery, unlike any other cemetery I’ve ever seen. It really is more like a city of the dead, with small stone, marble, concrete, and glass buildings housing the coffins of some of the more prominent citizens of Buenos Aires.

 

Our guide, Jessica (coincidentally the same guide as in 2010), told us stories about some of these little “houses,” and finally led us to Evita’s “house,” which contains her remains as well as those of her mother, two brothers and a sister. Apparently one of her sisters is still living. Surprisingly, it is one of the simpler structures in the middle of a “street” of such buildings, because the powers that be at the time of her burial wanted her buried with respect but not in any particular attention-getting way.

 

Our tour ended at the front gates of the cemetery, where Jessica bid us goodbye. Two of us took a taxi back to the ship, but four of us walked back to Florida Street, where Janice headed to McDonald’s for free internet and John, Sky and I found a small café above a shopping center where we had sandwiches and beer for lunch.

 

Sky headed back to the ship after lunch, but John and I walked to the Barquebus headquarters on the waterfront to buy our boat tickets to go to Colonia tomorrow. It’s a beautiful little colonial town just over the Uruguayan border, and we’re going to spend the night there and then take a bus the next morning into Montevideo to rejoin the ship.

 

When we got back to the terminal to take a shuttle to the ship, we had to wait while a young man sprayed the inside of the bus, including floors, hand rails, and seats. When we got back to the ship, we found a letter from the captain in our cabin explaining that there was some gastrointestinal illness going around the ship and that there would be measures to stop its spreading, including having all food in the Lido be served to us, having bread taken around by waiters at the dining table, and even having library books kept behind bars, with the librarians the only ones able to take them out and hand them to us. The captain means business!

 

Tonight is the tango show at Piazzola with our eight tablemates. We booked the VIP show, mostly because that one has a better menu and free wine, but we also have better seats upstairs at tables for four instead of at 20-foot long tables on the floor. It's STILL considerably less expensive than the HAL tango show! We went to a tango show in 2010, but we’re still looking forward to this one. You’ll hear about it tomorrow!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just loved Colonia de Sacramento in Uruguay. :D :D One of my favorite days on our South American cruise.

Hope you have a marvelous overnight adventure! Thanks for bringing us along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure you will have an absolutely FANTASTIC tango show. You make me wish I was back. thanks for your great posts and taking us along:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again for the link to Heo's blog. It really paid off this morning when I visited it and there were many beautiful photos posted after days of nothing new being added. You both looked lovely in your formal attire and also with the boa's around your shoulders. This makes it so much more real to see you along the way. Thanks for the blog. Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks again for the link to Heo's blog. It really paid off this morning when I visited it and there were many beautiful photos posted after days of nothing new being added. You both looked lovely in your formal attire and also with the boa's around your shoulders. This makes it so much more real to see you along the way. Thanks for the blog. Liz

 

I also use the link to Heo's blog and find the photos to be a great accompaniment to the reports here. Thanks for taking the time to type up such fantastic reports. I've never been to Buenos Aires so really appreciated such a thorough description.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 24– Day 19

Buenos Aires

 

Oh, that tango! The eight of us got our dancing clothes on and headed off via two taxis to Piazzola Tango, right in the middle of Florida Street, a lovely pedestrian-only shopping street in the middle of the Retiro district.

 

We were told to be there at 8:30, but when we arrived about 20 minutes early, we were ushered into a lovely little theatre-type room where we first introduced ourselves, and most of the guests were South American, with a group of Poles and our 8 Americans. We were then told we were going to learn to tango. The comments were great: “I am NOT going to go out there and humiliate myself!” and “I’d NEVER do that!” Well guess what? They did and they even enjoyed it. The men were put at one side of the dance floor and the women at the other (just like junior high dances) and we were taught two steps at a time until everyone had them down. Then it was time to partner up and practice. John and I had a great time, and it seemed like everyone else did too. It’s those kicks that will do you in.

 

After our lesson, everyone went across the beautiful art deco hallway into a much larger “theatre” style room which could have been a theatre in London with red velvet banquettes and boxes along the sides. Dinner service began, and everyone in our group opted for the steak – this is NOT a country for vegetarians! Some friends who went to a different show said that our food sounded much better. The Argentinian wines were quite good, and those servers just wouldn’t stop pouring – and being the good guests we are, we just wouldn’t stop drinking.

 

The show was wonderful, but very, very different from our previous experience at Senor Tango. Our walking guide, Jessica, put it best: Senor Tango is Las Vegas, while Piazzola is Broadway. The tango at both is marvelous, but the style is very different. We didn’t see the horses or fully attired gauchos on stage, nor did the show end with the owner singing “Don’t Cry for me, Argentina” accompanied by Argentine flags being lowered. The dancers, however, are oh, so talented, and I wonder how many bruises result from those close kicks.

 

Our little bus got us back to the ship at about 1:00, and that pillow had seldom looked so good, especially because we were scheduled to head to Colonia the next day.

 

To be continued . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 26 – Day 21

At Sea

 

We just love ferreting out places that have been named as UNESCO World Heritage sites, because they are usually such amazing treasures. Colonia del Sacramento (Colony of the Holy Sacrament) did not fail us. It’s about an hour by boat from Buenos Aires, and its cobbled streets, lined with beautiful multi-colored homes were built in 1680 and a few years after that.

 

We took the 12:30 Buquebus boat (I love saying “boo kee boos”) and had a comfortable ride an hour up the river. When we arrived, we found our adorable ten-room posada, The Posada de la Angel, and settled in. About two blocks away, on a riverside peninsula is the Barrio Historico, where the Plaza de Armas is the official center. There are restaurants, shops, museums, and Iglesia Matriz del Santisimo Sacramento, the oldest church in Uruguay, founded in 1699.

 

We wandered around, practicing our Spanish and looking into every building possible. The church is simply designed and not very big, but very peaceful. We went up and down streets looking for the most important thing: where to have dinner! Since we couldn’t decide, we went back to our posada and used the free(!) internet to get restaurant ratings on Tripadvisor. Number one was Buen Suspiro, so after a nap from 7:00 to 8:00 (really strange for us), we finally found the restaurant at about 8:30. It was full daylight, and our chosen spot was discovered to be outside and to have seven tables. Even though no one else was there, we decided to go into the beautiful little courtyard, which was the restaurant.

 

Everything seems to operate between slow and stop in South America, so when the menu and wine list didn’t arrive for 15 minutes, we didn’t worry. The local wine, produced in the Colonia area, is called Tannat, and there seemed to be dozens of wineries that produced it. We settled on a local dry ro for about $9.00 and it was really lovely.

 

The menu was quite different than any restaurant we’d been to. It had about ten pages, each one with a combination of tapas, and one only had to choose the combination desired. Our choice came under the “eyes are bigger than the belly” category. It contained two different kinds of small quiches, a small charcuterie platter, small skewers of chicken and vegetables, hot bread and cheese, all for about $20 for two people.

 

When I say cheese, I mean c.h.e.e.s.e. There were six different kinds, served on plates that were 6” square. Each plate was covered (really, really covered) with 3 types of cheese. If you don’t think that’s a lot, try measuring it out.

 

We worked on the food, finishing the skewers, almost all the quiches, part of the charcuterie, and about a fourth (maybe) of the cheese. When we asked our waiter if the cheese could be used for something (or someone) else, he said it would be thrown out, so we had him wrap it up to take back to the posada for one of the employees there. Dinner was great, but oh so filling.

 

An interesting thing about dinner was that it didn’t get dark until about 10:00, and people didn’t start arriving to fill up the other six tables until about 11:00. By the time we left at 11:30, it was finally full.

 

The next morning we left this peaceful little town on the (very comfortable) 10:30 bus, and arrived in Montevideo at 12:30 in time for a late lunch at The Market, a building which really isn’t a market but is a collection of restaurants which are an homage to meat. We ate at the same one we visited two years ago, and even ordered the same things: John had lamb chops and I had ribs. They’re still delicious, and were again accompanied by a bottle of “Media-Media,” a sparkling white wine characteristic of the city. I think I’ve had my share of beef for 2012!

 

Tonight is another formal night and we’re invited to the Captain’s Dinner in the Pinnacle, to which all full world cruisers are invited at one time or another. Now I have to decide what to wear and whether to pay any attention to tonight’s designation of Las Vegas Night. I don’t think so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 27 – Day 22

At Sea

 

Last night was our turn at the Captain’s Dinner. We have been told that there are about 700 full world cruisers on the ship, and they will all be invited to one of the Captain’s Dinners in the Pinnacle and seated with an officer. Last cruise we sat with Bart, the Food and Beverage Manager, and had a lovely dinner.

 

This time, however, we weren’t so lucky. On the first formal night, the officer assigned to our table chatted pleasantly throughout dinner, but when I saw him at the Lido the next morning during breakfast, it was as if I had never met him. Last night we had the same officer, and while he chatted from time to time, at one time he told us that he really didn’t like having to be at these dinners and dine with the passengers. Gee, we’re thrilled to meet you too. Late in the evening, in the Crow’s Nest, Susie (who sat with us in the Pinnacle) walked over to the bar to talk with a friend and said hello to our officer, who looked at her and asked her name – after having spent two hours at dinner with her an hour earlier.

 

Most of the officers are lovely people, but I think this one should get his wish and not be sent out to dine with passengers. I also thought it was ironic that he “could not” eat the beef served for dinner or the dessert because of his heart, but then headed straight up to the Crow’s Nest to smoke.

 

The show was the first one with our new crew of singers and dancers, and they are really very talented. There are six or seven of them, including two who only dance. It’s the same as before: if you see someone tall, thin, young, and good-looking on the ship, they’re probably part of this group. I should hate them, but they are so talented that I really can’t.

 

The evening had a great ending, though. When we decided at 1:30 that it was time to get some sleep, we found out that the clocks were to be set back an hour, so it was only 12:30. I just love westbound cruises!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too bad to hear about the Officer assigned to your table. I had always understood that it was an honor to be part of the Officers and Crew for the World Cruise, and that they were the "best of the best" aboard....

 

Perhaps this officer is better suited for 7 day cruises, where you can "fake it" for a week just fine. Doesn't work so well on a voyage of this length (or stature).:rolleyes:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really enjoying your posts and you taking us along. Wow, I can't believe this officer at your table. What a let down - you go for this nice meal and the 'honor' of being with an officer = and you get a jerk.! Really, really disappointing. What a shame. I know you will continue enjoying your cruise though come high water or a silly officer ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John and Diane,

 

Have just found your posts this morning and have spent the morning reading every one of them. I remember when you went on your first World Cruise back in 2008. I did enjoy reading your posts then.

 

You are bringing back lots of wonderful memories of when we were down in South America and I look forward to reading all your posts for the next few months.

 

Jennie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! Have read most of your blog and I think I need to "come aboard" to research what world cruising is all about?:p:):D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 28 – Stanley, Falklands Islands

Day 23

 

The question when approaching The Falklands (AKA The Malvinas) is will we or won’t we? The currents here can be difficult, and two years ago, we had 30-foot waves which prohibited us from landing, thereby missing our full-day “Penguin Safari.” We had been scheduled to drive across the 1982 battle-fields to see hundreds of king penguins, but that was not to be.

 

During yesterday’s “Voice from the Bridge,” Captain Mercer said that he was “hopeful” that we would be able to anchor and be able to tender in the passengers. Last night and this morning have been smooth, so it looks like it might just happen.

 

* * *

We made it! Not only The Amsterdam, but the Star Princess with 2600 passengers, were anchored offshore, ready to be ferried into Port Stanley, the capital of the Falklands. We were on the first tender and found someone with our name on a placard ready to drive us the 2-1/2 hours over gravel roads and then over paths across the pastures for the bumpiest ride of our lives. It was great fun.

 

Volunteer Point is one of the best places in the world to see penguins, and we sure saw a lot of them. Like high school students, they kept to their own groups, with Magellanics and their burrows up from the beach, Gentoos in the middle, with lots of furry youngsters on the outside of their group, and the wonderful, taller, more colorful King penguins on the farthest side. They all seem to follow the same grouping practice. Although there were a lot of chicks and young, there were still females sitting on eggs. Those females constitute the center of a huge circle of birds. The mature males are either around them or off by themselves (smoking cigars? Telling dirty jokes?), and the outside of the huge circle was made up of young penguins, some still with their grey fuzzy covering and some beginning to shed it to show their shiny black and white feathers.

 

There were literally thousands of them, and they were not in the least afraid of the hundreds of people who came to view them. In fact, if you sat in the sand (it’s also a beautiful beach), a penguin would usually come up to check you out. They’re inquisitive little creatures. Maggie, a cute little nine-year-old on the cruise (with her parents and her tutor), was so excited because a penguin had come up and gently pecked her back.

 

There were “fences”, which were no more than red-topped sticks stuck in the sand at about 15-foot intervals, which, surprisingly, kept people from the penguins, but there was nothing to prevent the penguins from approaching the people – and they did. There were almost a thousand Kings, over a thousand Magellanics, and about six or seven hundred Gentoos. What particularly fascinated me was watching groups of six or eight – or even ten or twenty – line themselves up and head to or from the water. They look for all the world like headwaiters in Paris.

 

Our return ride was just as bumpy – and as much fun – and took us back to Stanley in time to walk around a bit and see some of the city’s downtown. We went into the cathedral, which is the world’s southernmost Anglican cathedral, and glanced into a couple of shops, but the bit attraction was the supermarket. We just love grocery shopping in other countries, and I especially love to shop in markets in English colonies. While I am an Anglophile, that’s not the reason. It’s because instead of Coca Light, which has a funny taste, England and its colonies sell genuine Diet Coke, so I bought three 2-liter bottles. We also picked up some Walker’s salt and vinegar chips (yum!), some cookies, and three bottles of hard cider, with Champagne one of my two favorite alcoholic beverages. I learned to love it while hiking through England one summer, and have enjoyed it ever since.

 

We got back to the ship in plenty of time for sailaway, which, because of the cold, was almost not attended. There was no band, and everyone seemed to be really tired. The dining room was not very full, but the Lido was. Our guest for the evening was Brett, the Assistant Cruise Director and DJ. He is great fun and we enjoyed teasing him. There was a great deal of laughter, and we found that he’s very good at cork-forking. (Yes, we do still enjoy the occasional cork fork, but not every night. I think some people at the table behind us might have asked for a change of location!)

 

The entertainment last night was a 1940’s movie in the Queen’s Lounge about the explorer Scott, which we skipped. And so to bed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderful report on the penguins! Thanks very much to you two for sharing your world cruise experiences with us.

 

May good weather and calm seas follow you to Antarctica!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! Great writing about a wonderful adventure. Fun to read! Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a treat to see so many penguins. It makes up for missing the Falklands two years ago. Unfortunately, we missed out in 2006. We went close to where the ships tenders but a gale was happening so we went on our way down to Antarctica with huge waves and a day or so of extreme weather. Once there, it was calm, sunny and magical.

 

Jennie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 30 – Day 25

At Sea in Antarctica

 

Icebergs, icebergs, icebergs! It’s beautiful and colder than . . well, you know. This morning we woke to 0 degrees Celsius and the sight of glaciers covering Elephant Island and continuing down into the sea. At about 12:00, we began seeing the occasional iceberg through clearer, but still grey skies, and then at about 2:00 we were right in the middle of hundreds of them. Thoughts of the Titanic do intrude from time to time, but our wonderful ice captain’s job is to keep us from replaying that particular movie. We could not admire more the skill of the captain and the ice captain in negotiating the hundreds of icebergs through which we sail.

 

The icebergs, though dangerous, are things of beauty. They’re an eerie blue, Some are as small as refrigerators, others like Buicks, and still others, as big as aircraft carriers, loom over the ocean. Knowing that only 10% of an iceberg shows, the part under the water must be pretty scary.

 

The amazing thing about these icebergs is all the other “stuff” about them. Many of them are home to penguin colonies, and they’re surrounded by other wildlife. Some of the critters sighted today have been whales, seals, and penguins, penguins, penguins. One of the best sights is a colony of penguins on an iceberg using the side of it as a slide. They take turns, one at a time, sliding down the curved side into the water, and then swim around to a place where they can “re-board” the iceberg and get in line (really!) to do it again. When we saw that in 2010, we thought it was a one-time event, but it’s happening again! Later, groups of dozens of penguins were sighted from our stateroom window swimming and then “flying” above the waves like flying fish.

 

We’ll be in Antarctic waters on the edges of the Antarctic Peninsula for three days before we head around Cape Horn toward Ushuaia, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world. Today and tomorrow we’re in the Antarctic Sound, Wednesday we’re cruising the Wilhelm Archipelago, and then we head for Cape Horn. This morning at 2:00, according to the Captain, we crossed 60 degrees south latitude, something he told us should go into our diaries. So there you are.

 

Last night was a Sommelier Dinner in the Pinnacle Grill, something that happened three times in 2010 but only once this year. I think that’s a good thing. It’s not that it costs $69 for the six-course dinner paired with wine, it’s that it is just too much food and too much wine for me. I enjoyed it, but I’ve been suffering from it (no, I DON’T have a headache) all day. I just feel like I ate a great deal and don’t want to eat ever again.

 

We began with tuna and salmon poke, a Hawaiian treatment of raw fish which I didn’t think I’d like, but I did. It was paired with Veuve Clicquot Champagne, so all was VERY well. Next it was seared foie gras with a Spanish white, followed by roast garlic and leek soup – my very favorite course – with an Australian chardonnay. Our fish course was halibut on crushed crab with an Oregon pinot noir and then, just to refresh our palates, we were served a tomato and basil granite, although how it could taste so much like those two and still be absolutely clear is still a mystery.

Our main course was grilled saddle of lamb, and I swear, even if you think you don’t like lamb, you would have loved this one. It was served with an Australian shiraz. For dessert, we had a chocolate tower filled with white chocolate ganache, served with a Portuguese port, a glass which went untouched at my plate.

 

As you can see, even though each serving was small, it’s a lot of food. Except for the refill on the Champagne, wine servings were small, but everything combined pretty much just overwhelmed my system. However, it was sooooo good that I’d probably do it again!

 

One of the highlights today was watching the “Polar Bear Dip,” when about 30 (crazy) people, in their swimsuits, jumped into the aft outdoor pool when the temperature was below freezing. They were so cold that they didn’t even wait for the 10:30 start time, but once they got into that warm pool, they just wanted to stay in. Then they had to get out, into snow flurries, and you’ve never seen so many shivering bodies looking madly for big fluffy pool towels. I just hope no one comes down with anything from it.

 

I think it’s time to go outside and watch icebergs and penguins again. It will be entertaining – if not absolutely freezing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Q&A with the Coral Expeditions Team
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...