Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
JennN

Jamaica - Warning for GLBT Cruisers

Recommended Posts

Every gay person whose ship docks in Jamaica and stays on the ship should write a letter to their Minister of Tourism stating what they are doing and the exact amount of money they are NOT spending there. I'm sure over the course of a year that would add up to quite a lot.

 

Here's an easy way to do this via the Ministry of Tourism's Website. I wrote them about a week ago:

 

http://www.mot.gov.jm/contact/Contact%20the%20Ministry%20of%20Tourism

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been scouring the Celebrity website excursion pages...I just want to do everything. I really hadn't cared about Jamaicans and their apparent hatred of the most fabulous people. I've grown up with Americans who hated me because of my being gay...no worries if some stranger on an island hates me. Right? But, with SO much being said about their awful behavior, skipping Jamaica sounds like a good idea.

 

Besides, I thought of all the gay people who are probably going to stay on the ship...and, well, doesn't that just sound fantastic? A ship full of gay people? So, I'm going to treat Jamaica as a Sea Day and work on making the most of my beverage package. :eek:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The first time I was in Jamiaca was 1975....the harrassment was so blatant...and I was a boy walking down the main street w/ my Aunt...the problem was the color of our skin(unless of course we wanted to buy drugs) - after a short period we went straight back to the ship.

 

Many years later I did get off the ship on a stop there - 15 minutes was all it took to say I would never go there again...when I have been on a cruise that stopped there I simply stayed on the ship.

 

Unfortunately in some of the carib islands there is a strong right wing religious zealousness that encourages crazy hateful behavior....The Bahamas, Barbados, St Croix are just a couple of places where there have been problems. And it seems that Puerto Rico is also starting to have problems.

 

Always be aware of whats going on around you...

and take your $$$$$$ elsewhere!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been scouring the Celebrity website excursion pages...I just want to do everything. I really hadn't cared about Jamaicans and their apparent hatred of the most fabulous people. I've grown up with Americans who hated me because of my being gay...no worries if some stranger on an island hates me. Right? But, with SO much being said about their awful behavior, skipping Jamaica sounds like a good idea.

 

Besides, I thought of all the gay people who are probably going to stay on the ship...and, well, doesn't that just sound fantastic? A ship full of gay people? So, I'm going to treat Jamaica as a Sea Day and work on making the most of my beverage package. :eek:

 

I'll be doing the same in Labadee. Absolutely no reason to get off the ship. Unless you like dining at an all you can eat buffet while starving people stare at you through the barbed wire fence 20 feet away. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Montego Bay is one of our stops on our upcoming September cruise. It will be the one and only time we ever see Jamaica so we have decided to do a Carnival Excursion. We'll be doing the Bobsleds and Dunn's River Falls. We don't show PDA and if anyone asks, we are brothers. I'm not too worried about it. We did just fine in Barbados. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll be doing the same in Labadee. Absolutely no reason to get off the ship. Unless you like dining at an all you can eat buffet while starving people stare at you through the barbed wire fence 20 feet away. :(

 

Actually there won't be people looking at you through a barbed wire fence 20 feet away. The section in Labadee that is closed off from the rest of the Island of Haiti is a huge section and the fence is not even visable at all, nor would the average person know that they are cut off from the rest of Haiti. It is at a very remote tip of the Island and the only Haitians that will be anywhere remotely near the area are the ones that work there and maybe their children will be with them in the market area. If this is the only reason why you are choosing to stay on the ship then I urge you to visit. There are Haitians working inside the resort area of Labadee and native Haitians that will be selling their crafts in the craft market area. I have never found Haitians to be overtly mean or nasty to gay people and they definitely don't have the reputation that the Jamacians have in regards to how they treat us.

 

I only wish I had the chance to visit Labadee as I lived in Haiti 23 years ago and worked as a volunteer in Port Au Prince for a year after college in 1991 and spent 8 years traveling back and forth to Haiti. I miss the Haitian people so much and for those that have never visited Haiti the kindness of these people is really amazing. That is what drew me to work and live in Haiti after graduation as I intended to join the Peace Corps and go to Africa but the chance to visit Haiti with a church group from my University came up and once I arrived in Haiti and spent 10 days there I knew I had to return. Haiti holds a special place in my heart and the Haitian people are so very poor yet they are some of the most gracious and happy people I have ever met in my life.

 

As a gay woman I would never give anyone in Jamacia my money but in my own personal experience the Haitian people are much kinder and those that have stalls selling their crafts in the market area are actually able to survive and feed their families because of what RCCL does. I don't necessarily agree with how they fence off the entire resort area from the rest of the island and don't let the cruise passengers venture away from the resort section, but I can see their fear due to the constant political turmoil in Haiti over the past few decades.. I actually lived in Port Au Prince and was right in the middle of one of their military coups in 1991 so I know the fear about that, but what has made me less angry with what RCCL does in Haiti is the fact that because of their resort area, there are without a doubt several Haitian families that are surviving and feeding and supporting themselves because they work in the resort area and sell their crafts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm looking forward to Haiti...it will probably be the one real relaxing day of my cruise! All I want to do is get sit on the beach and swim a bit. No desperate searching for a spot by the pool or battling through a sea of people waving their Sea Pass at the two over worked bartenders serving the crowds by the pool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't necessarily agree with how they fence off the entire resort area from the rest of the island and don't let the cruise passengers venture away from the resort section, but I can see their fear due to the constant political turmoil in Haiti over the past few decades..

 

Likely has a lot to do with the US Department of State's travel advisories, this one issued this March, 2014 replacing the former one issued August 2013:

 

http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/alertswarnings/haiti-travel-warning.html

 

The Department of State has issued this Travel Warning to inform U.S. citizens traveling to or living in Haiti about the security situation in Haiti. This replaces the Travel Warning dated August 13, 2013 and provides updated information regarding levels of crime in Haiti. While violent crime has declined, travelers to Haiti should still exercise caution.

 

The Department of State urges U.S. citizens to exercise caution when visiting Haiti given Haiti’s weak emergency response infrastructure. Hundreds of thousands of U.S. citizens safely visit Haiti each year, but the poor state of Haiti’s emergency response network should be carefully considered when planning travel. Travelers to Haiti are encouraged to use organizations that have solid infrastructure, evacuation, and medical support options in place. (Please see the Country Specific Information page for Haiti.)

 

Haiti's emergency management infrastructure remains in poor condition and inadequate. Medical facilities, including ambulance services, are particularly weak. Some U.S. citizens injured in accidents and others with serious health concerns have been unable to find necessary medical care in Haiti and have had to arrange and pay for medical evacuation to the United States. We strongly encourage visitors to Haiti to obtain evacuation insurance.

 

U.S. citizens have been victims of violent crime, including homicide and kidnapping, predominantly in the Port-au-Prince area, although the incidence of both homicide and kidnapping is down sharply in during the last year. No U.S. citizens were kidnapped since the issuance of the previous Travel Warning and homicides are down from 2012 to 2013. As with other countries that have high levels of poverty, U.S. citizens are urged to remain aware of the possibility of robbery. In December 2013, the Embassy learned of six cases of U.S. citizens arriving in Port-au-Prince on flights from the United States who were robbed shortly after departing the airport, a spike associated with the busy travel period during the holidays. It is recommended that U.S. citizens have their host/organization meet them at the airport upon arrival and/or have pre-arranged airport transfers and hotels. U.S. citizens are also urged to exercise caution when visiting banks in Port-au-Prince. Robbery crews have been known to surveil banks and rob customers shortly after departure. While the Government of Haiti has made progress to arrest and disrupt perpetrators, kidnapping for ransom can affect anyone in Haiti, most particularly those maintaining long-term residence in the country.

 

Regions of Haiti outside the capital have fewer reported incidents of crime. However, the Haitian authorities' ability to respond to emergencies is limited and in some areas nonexistent. Embassy employees are required to adhere to certain required security and safety measures when traveling outside of Port-au-Prince, and they have restrictions on travel in certain areas or times. Additionally, U.S. Embassy personnel are under an Embassy-imposed curfew of 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. and must remain at home or another safe facility during curfew hours. This may constrain the Embassy’s ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Port-au-Prince. For additional details on restrictions on staff travel within Haiti, please see our Country Specific Information for Haiti.

 

The United Nations’ Stabilization Force for Haiti (MINUSTAH) remains in Haiti to support the activities of the Haitian National Police. The Haitian National Police (HNP), with assistance from MINUSTAH, are responsible for maintaining order and rendering assistance. However, given the possibility and unpredictability of spontaneous protests, their ability to assist U.S. citizens during disturbances is very limited. U.S. government-facilitated evacuations, such as the evacuation that took place from Haiti in 2010, occur only when no safe commercial alternatives exist. Please see our website for additional information on how the Department of State assists U.S. citizens during a crisis.

 

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Haiti are urged to review our Country Specific Information page. U.S. private sector organizations with operations in Haiti can obtain additional information on the security situation in the country through the U.S. Department of State’s Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC). OSAC’s mission is to promote security cooperation between U.S. private sector interests worldwide and the U.S. Department of State. OSAC also maintains an active Country Council in Haiti to promote the exchange of security-related information. The Council is comprised of security professionals and is co-chaired by the Regional Security Officer at the U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince and a private sector representative. U.S. private sector entities can obtain additional information on OSAC by visiting the OSAC website.

 

U.S. citizens are strongly urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) in order to receive the most up-to-date security information. While the Embassy's ability to provide emergency consular services is extremely limited, travel enrollment will enable receipt of security messages via email. Current information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States; callers outside the United States and Canada can receive the information by calling a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, except U.S. federal holidays. The Embassy of the United States of America is located in Port-au-Prince at Boulevard du 15 Octobre, Tabarre 41, Tabarre, Haiti, telephone: (509) 2229-8000, facsimile: (509) 2229-8027, email: acspap@state.gov American Citizens Services (ACS) Unit office hours are 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Consular Section is closed on U.S. and local holidays. After hours, on weekends and on holidays, please call (509) 2229-8000 and an automated attendant will connect you with the Embassy duty officer. U.S. citizens can also stay informed about conditions in Haiti by following the Embassy and ACS on Twitter and Facebook.

 

Embassies & Consulates

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince

Boulevard du 15 October,

Tabarre 41, Route de Tabarre

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

 

Telephone

+(509) 2229-8000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone

+(509) 2229-8000

Fax

+(509) 2229-8027

Email

acspap@state.gov

U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince

Map of Haiti

click to enlarge

 

Learn About Your Destination

 

Enroll in STEP

Enrolling in this free service will allow us to better assist you in case of an emergency while you are abroad.

Edited by cle-guy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Likely has a lot to do with the US Department of State's travel advisories, this one issued this March, 2014 replacing the former one issued August 2013:

 

http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/alertswarnings/haiti-travel-warning.html

 

The Department of State has issued this Travel Warning to inform U.S. citizens traveling to or living in Haiti about the security situation in Haiti. This replaces the Travel Warning dated August 13, 2013 and provides updated information regarding levels of crime in Haiti. While violent crime has declined, travelers to Haiti should still exercise caution.

 

The Department of State urges U.S. citizens to exercise caution when visiting Haiti given Haiti’s weak emergency response infrastructure. Hundreds of thousands of U.S. citizens safely visit Haiti each year, but the poor state of Haiti’s emergency response network should be carefully considered when planning travel. Travelers to Haiti are encouraged to use organizations that have solid infrastructure, evacuation, and medical support options in place. (Please see the Country Specific Information page for Haiti.)

 

Haiti's emergency management infrastructure remains in poor condition and inadequate. Medical facilities, including ambulance services, are particularly weak. Some U.S. citizens injured in accidents and others with serious health concerns have been unable to find necessary medical care in Haiti and have had to arrange and pay for medical evacuation to the United States. We strongly encourage visitors to Haiti to obtain evacuation insurance.

 

U.S. citizens have been victims of violent crime, including homicide and kidnapping, predominantly in the Port-au-Prince area, although the incidence of both homicide and kidnapping is down sharply in during the last year. No U.S. citizens were kidnapped since the issuance of the previous Travel Warning and homicides are down from 2012 to 2013. As with other countries that have high levels of poverty, U.S. citizens are urged to remain aware of the possibility of robbery. In December 2013, the Embassy learned of six cases of U.S. citizens arriving in Port-au-Prince on flights from the United States who were robbed shortly after departing the airport, a spike associated with the busy travel period during the holidays. It is recommended that U.S. citizens have their host/organization meet them at the airport upon arrival and/or have pre-arranged airport transfers and hotels. U.S. citizens are also urged to exercise caution when visiting banks in Port-au-Prince. Robbery crews have been known to surveil banks and rob customers shortly after departure. While the Government of Haiti has made progress to arrest and disrupt perpetrators, kidnapping for ransom can affect anyone in Haiti, most particularly those maintaining long-term residence in the country.

 

Regions of Haiti outside the capital have fewer reported incidents of crime. However, the Haitian authorities' ability to respond to emergencies is limited and in some areas nonexistent. Embassy employees are required to adhere to certain required security and safety measures when traveling outside of Port-au-Prince, and they have restrictions on travel in certain areas or times. Additionally, U.S. Embassy personnel are under an Embassy-imposed curfew of 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. and must remain at home or another safe facility during curfew hours. This may constrain the Embassy’s ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Port-au-Prince. For additional details on restrictions on staff travel within Haiti, please see our Country Specific Information for Haiti.

 

The United Nations’ Stabilization Force for Haiti (MINUSTAH) remains in Haiti to support the activities of the Haitian National Police. The Haitian National Police (HNP), with assistance from MINUSTAH, are responsible for maintaining order and rendering assistance. However, given the possibility and unpredictability of spontaneous protests, their ability to assist U.S. citizens during disturbances is very limited. U.S. government-facilitated evacuations, such as the evacuation that took place from Haiti in 2010, occur only when no safe commercial alternatives exist. Please see our website for additional information on how the Department of State assists U.S. citizens during a crisis.

 

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Haiti are urged to review our Country Specific Information page. U.S. private sector organizations with operations in Haiti can obtain additional information on the security situation in the country through the U.S. Department of State’s Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC). OSAC’s mission is to promote security cooperation between U.S. private sector interests worldwide and the U.S. Department of State. OSAC also maintains an active Country Council in Haiti to promote the exchange of security-related information. The Council is comprised of security professionals and is co-chaired by the Regional Security Officer at the U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince and a private sector representative. U.S. private sector entities can obtain additional information on OSAC by visiting the OSAC website.

 

U.S. citizens are strongly urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) in order to receive the most up-to-date security information. While the Embassy's ability to provide emergency consular services is extremely limited, travel enrollment will enable receipt of security messages via email. Current information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States; callers outside the United States and Canada can receive the information by calling a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, except U.S. federal holidays. The Embassy of the United States of America is located in Port-au-Prince at Boulevard du 15 Octobre, Tabarre 41, Tabarre, Haiti, telephone: (509) 2229-8000, facsimile: (509) 2229-8027, email: acspap@state.gov American Citizens Services (ACS) Unit office hours are 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Consular Section is closed on U.S. and local holidays. After hours, on weekends and on holidays, please call (509) 2229-8000 and an automated attendant will connect you with the Embassy duty officer. U.S. citizens can also stay informed about conditions in Haiti by following the Embassy and ACS on Twitter and Facebook.

 

Embassies & Consulates

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince

Boulevard du 15 October,

Tabarre 41, Route de Tabarre

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

 

Telephone

+(509) 2229-8000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone

+(509) 2229-8000

Fax

+(509) 2229-8027

Email

acspap@state.gov

U.S. Embassy Port-au-Prince

Map of Haiti

click to enlarge

 

Learn About Your Destination

 

Enroll in STEP

Enrolling in this free service will allow us to better assist you in case of an emergency while you are abroad.

 

Yes, they have been issuing pretty much the same kind of travel warning to Haiti for the past 30 some years, ever since Duvalier was ousted in 1986. My mom had a slight conniption fit when I said I was going to work in Haiti for a year back in 1990 and then of course when I got there a Coup de'tat happened three months after my arrival. She never quite forgave me for the near heart attacks I have given her in all my years of traveling to Haiti.

 

I nearly took my 17 year old daughter down there this summer as she wanted to spend a few weeks volunteering at Mother Theresa's Home for sick and dying children in Port Au Prince like I did back in 1991/92, but my father got very sick with Cancer and she was afraid to go away for too many weeks. My daughter is half Haitian and she wanted to re-connect with her father's family as they are still all in Haiti and wanted to learn more about her Haitian culture. It was my chance to go back to a country I consider my second home. I have not been to Haiti since 2003 when I took my daughter there for 2 weeks.

 

I miss it very much.. :(:(

 

but for people just visiting with RCCL Labadee is very very safe..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, they have been issuing pretty much the same kind of travel warning to Haiti for the past 30 some years, ever since Duvalier was ousted in 1986. My mom had a slight conniption fit when I said I was going to work in Haiti for a year back in 1990 and then of course when I got there a Coup de'tat happened three months after my arrival. She never quite forgave me for the near heart attacks I have given her in all my years of traveling to Haiti.

 

I nearly took my 17 year old daughter down there this summer as she wanted to spend a few weeks volunteering at Mother Theresa's Home for sick and dying children in Port Au Prince like I did back in 1991/92, but my father got very sick with Cancer and she was afraid to go away for too many weeks. My daughter is half Haitian and she wanted to re-connect with her father's family as they are still all in Haiti and wanted to learn more about her Haitian culture. It was my chance to go back to a country I consider my second home. I have not been to Haiti since 2003 when I took my daughter there for 2 weeks.

 

I miss it very much.. :(:(

 

but for people just visiting with RCCL Labadee is very very safe..

 

 

I have similar fondness and issues with egypt, Spent lots of time there the last 10 years, and have been back twice since the unrest. People really do not know "reality" without going, the news makes things much to sensationalized compared to reality. I keep in touch with about 20 friends or so there thru Facebook which helps me stay connected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually there won't be people looking at you through a barbed wire fence 20 feet away. The section in Labadee that is closed off from the rest of the Island of Haiti is a huge section and the fence is not even visable at all, nor would the average person know that they are cut off from the rest of Haiti. It is at a very remote tip of the Island and the only Haitians that will be anywhere remotely near the area are the ones that work there and maybe their children will be with them in the market area.

 

Your connection to Haiti in general notwithstanding, you're wrong. I was there just last year on Liberty OTS. And there absolutely were people standing on the other side of the barbed wire fence next to where the lunch buffet was set up, rubbing their stomachs and motioning to the food.

 

Let me be clear: none of these people bothered me or harassed me at all. Every Haitian I came across (including the local artists) seemed very nice. Incidentally, not that it matters, but my best friend is Haitian, from a prominent family in Petionville and his family built Labadee. And the poverty is palpable, even there. It's very sad, and I feel real empathy for their situation. I just don't necessarily want to be overcome with it while on vacation. :(

 

P.S.: My avatar was taken in Labadee!

Edited by Vivere LaDolceVita

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best thing you can do in Haiti, when in Labadee, is to visit the Straw Market and BUY something.

 

Now, to Jamaica. I'll be there with my Boyfriend in September and I'm trying to get a trip to a nude all inclusive beach break booked as a surprise to him. Does anyone have have any tips/tricks/warnings?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The best thing you can do in Haiti, when in Labadee, is to visit the Straw Market and BUY something.

 

Now, to Jamaica. I'll be there with my Boyfriend in September and I'm trying to get a trip to a nude all inclusive beach break booked as a surprise to him. Does anyone have have any tips/tricks/warnings?

Personally, I wouldn't do it. It may be all inclusive, but remember it's an all inclusive "straight" nude beach area. I'm not being a prude here, as we've done nude bathing in PTown enough times. Jamaica...a whole different world! I'd treat your boyfriend to the best spa day on board that you can book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your connection to Haiti in general notwithstanding, you're wrong. I was there just last year on Liberty OTS. And there absolutely were people standing on the other side of the barbed wire fence next to where the lunch buffet was set up, rubbing their stomachs and motioning to the food.

 

Let me be clear: none of these people bothered me or harassed me at all. Every Haitian I came across (including the local artists) seemed very nice. Incidentally, not that it matters, but my best friend is Haitian, from a prominent family in Petionville and his family built Labadee. And the poverty is palpable, even there. It's very sad, and I feel real empathy for their situation. I just don't necessarily want to be overcome with it while on vacation. :(

 

P.S.: My avatar was taken in Labadee!

 

Ah that is really sad then, I have not been to Labadee but from what I read about it from others was that it was so closed off from the rest of the Island you would not be able to see the fence or anyone else on the other side for that matter, obviously those people that said that in their posts really were not paying attention at all then.

 

I'm glad you have had the chance to visit already once, and Yes the poverty is beyond horrible. I don't think I would be able to be in vacation mode and be eating at the lunch buffet either then if I could see the locals on the other side of the fence watching. That is really sad :( Thank you for informing me about this as I had absolutely no idea at all that the area was laid out like that. I have been reading reviews for a while now from people that have gone to Labadee and go there a lot and nobody ever mentioned that the local people were standing there staring at you from the other side of the fence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right. I think I actually have to unsubscribe from this thread! This cruise is, for me, a real luxury...it's costing me every penny I have. It's a ridiculous waste of my funds and it's really quite frivolous.

My avocation is to make the world a better place. But, for one week out of the year I don't want to know about a fence or to imagine what's beyond it. My life isn't hellish...but I'm exhausted. I serve people everyday and look forward to one week of not caring about the state of the world beyond the next buffet. I have 51 other weeks of the year to worry about fences and poverty. Of course I probably sound like an 'ugly american'...I'm not, but the last thing I need is my one real luxury weighted by guilt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ah that is really sad then, I have not been to Labadee but from what I read about it from others was that it was so closed off from the rest of the Island you would not be able to see the fence or anyone else on the other side for that matter, obviously those people that said that in their posts really were not paying attention at all then.

 

I'm glad you have had the chance to visit already once, and Yes the poverty is beyond horrible. I don't think I would be able to be in vacation mode and be eating at the lunch buffet either then if I could see the locals on the other side of the fence watching. That is really sad :( Thank you for informing me about this as I had absolutely no idea at all that the area was laid out like that. I have been reading reviews for a while now from people that have gone to Labadee and go there a lot and nobody ever mentioned that the local people were standing there staring at you from the other side of the fence.

 

As sad as it is to say, I imagine that for some people, poor, starving folks do not even register for them. They are too wrapped up in themselves and their vacationing to notice the world around them. It's also possible that if you were only looking towards the beach and did not look up the hill beyond the barbed wire fence, they could escape your attention. But I tend to think most people just didn't want to acknowledge the situation. Very sad.

 

I absolutely believe in supporting the poor in our own country and abroad, and do a good deal of charity work at home. But on vacation, it's tough to enjoy yourself if you're confronted with such misery. It just feels wrong and insensitive to put a cruise port in the middle of an island where just feet away, the govt cannot provide basic infrastructure and support for its own people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Right. I think I actually have to unsubscribe from this thread! This cruise is, for me, a real luxury...it's costing me every penny I have. It's a ridiculous waste of my funds and it's really quite frivolous.

My avocation is to make the world a better place. But, for one week out of the year I don't want to know about a fence or to imagine what's beyond it. My life isn't hellish...but I'm exhausted. I serve people everyday and look forward to one week of not caring about the state of the world beyond the next buffet. I have 51 other weeks of the year to worry about fences and poverty. Of course I probably sound like an 'ugly american'...I'm not, but the last thing I need is my one real luxury weighted by guilt.

 

That's exactly why I intend to stay on the ship. The country will still get your port fees (although who knows whose pockets they will fill). Assuming you don't plan to buy anything in the market (artwork, souvenirs), there is no good reason to disembark. The beach is nice but no better or worse than at any other major caribbean port. You can see the lush, green, rolling hills and shoreline from the ship. And if you get curious about the locals, they sometimes have local musicians and dancers performing on the dock next to the ship for tips. You can look from deck or walk just off the gangway to check it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, that's not it at all...I'm probably going to get off the ship and hit the beach at least!

But I don't want to feel like a rotten person because other people disapprove. I live in a studio apt in Boston where the number of beach days is cut by three seasons...If I go on a tropical vacation I want to make the most of the sun and sand.

If I choose to hit the beach in Haiti, I will do so without guilt or shame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No, that's not it at all...I'm probably going to get off the ship and hit the beach at least!

But I don't want to feel like a rotten person because other people disapprove. I live in a studio apt in Boston where the number of beach days is cut by three seasons...If I go on a tropical vacation I want to make the most of the sun and sand.

If I choose to hit the beach in Haiti, I will do so without guilt or shame.

 

I wasn't suggesting that you shouldn't, only that I would probably not do the same for the reasons I listed. As with any port, different people will experience things differently.

 

And of course, I've already seen Labadee, so I'm not passing anything up. If I had never been, I would probably want to get off and explore too, despite the issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had never been, I would probably want to get off and explore too, despite the issues.

 

That's exactly why we are getting off the ship in Montego Bay. This will be our first and only time to visit Jamaica. We want to see the island while we are there.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Montego Bay is one of our stops on our upcoming September cruise. It will be the one and only time we ever see Jamaica so we have decided to do a Carnival Excursion. We'll be doing the Bobsleds and Dunn's River Falls. We don't show PDA and if anyone asks, we are brothers. I'm not too worried about it. We did just fine in Barbados. ;)

 

Well, yeah, I suppose that closeting oneself is one way of dealing with a homophobic culture. And honestly, it's your choice. As I said elsewhere, I've traveled through some countries with horrific governments, like Syria and Burma. But the idea that being schlepped on a guided tour to Dunn's River Falls is in any sense "seeing Jamaica" made me giggle a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So here's a suggestion. If you do decide to visit Jamaica or St. Petersburg or wherever, buy a couple fewer drinks while there and send that money to ILGA (http://ilga.org/) or Amnesty International's LGBT rights campaign. Let's face it: might be a drop in the bucket, but it might well bring better results than just staying on the ship.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So here's a suggestion. If you do decide to visit Jamaica or St. Petersburg or wherever, buy a couple fewer drinks while there and send that money to ILGA (http://ilga.org/) or Amnesty International's LGBT rights campaign. Let's face it: might be a drop in the bucket, but it might well bring better results than just staying on the ship.

 

I think you are brilliant. Thank you for a great idea!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, yeah, I suppose that closeting oneself is one way of dealing with a homophobic culture. And honestly, it's your choice. As I said elsewhere, I've traveled through some countries with horrific governments, like Syria and Burma. But the idea that being schlepped on a guided tour to Dunn's River Falls is in any sense "seeing Jamaica" made me giggle a bit.

 

Whoa! Back up. Who said anything about closeting ourselves? We don't show PDA anywhere, it's not just because we are in Jamaica. While I get that a guided tour to Dunn's River Falls might not be your idea of "seeing Jamaica", we feel that it's probably the safest way for us to see some of Jamaica via the 1.5 hour bus ride each way. Giggle all you want but Bobsleds and the Falls sound like a lot of fun to these two Kansas boys! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • 2019 Cruisers' Choice Awards
      • NCL Sail-Away Giveaway Sweepstakes - Win a 7-Day Cruise on Norwegian Joy!
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Community Contests
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...