Jump to content

Night photography and cruise lines ?


Recommended Posts

Hi all ,

 

I really love night photography and light painting. I just took a course about it and I plan on doing a little light painting in my next cruise in 37 days :)

 

I do not think I could have a problem with having my 3D led maglight on board with me but...will I be able to use it ???

 

I mean late at night on deck outsite can I use it ? Or in ports, if I light it and "brush" the ship with it, will I get arrested ? Someone might think I am planning some harm to the ship :(

 

I would not want to have my equipement taken away from me ..

 

Any of you have experience with this ??

 

Thanks to all in advance

 

 

 

 

Have fun

Link to post
Share on other sites

Right up front I'll say I have no experience with this.

But I have a question....

Are you talking about when you set the camera up for a long

exposure and you write/draw with light? I saw this on the net

and I thought it was really cool to see, but I haven't tried it?

I would love to see any of your examples, if you have any.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think you'll have a problem, since you'll be lighting the ship while standing next to a tripod and camera so they should know you're there for photography. I find if in doubt, the best thing to do is to talk to security/police/ship employees on the dock area where you are setting up and let them know you want to try some cool shots, and explain what you're doing. I've done that many times, when at port, and 45 minutes before sailing, when they see one lone passenger walking along the ship on the dock and then stopping to do something. I show them my camera, tripod, and even tell them to check out the results of some long exposures. Hasn't been a problem.

 

Same thing for onboard shots out on deck - you likely won't have problems, but if so, just explain it to whichever ship staff asks. They might see the flashlight action on a security camera and wonder what's going on -and send someone to ask - as long as you explain, it shouldn't be a problem. I am often up at 1am on the ship taking long exposures with a tripod, and usually any staff who comes to talk enjoys seeing the result on the LCD!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

Ok I know it's been a while but I just learned how to post pictures the way I wanted.

 

So I have a few from my Breakaway cruise from last November.

 

And no I did not have any trouble coming or going with the equipment on or off the ship.

 

p><p><img src=[/img]

 

p><p><img src=[/img]

 

This one I really like...the dreamy water and smoke from the engine

 

p><p><img src=IMG_1540_zpsa39e73d0.jpg' alt='IMG_1540_

 

Cant wait to sail again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My belief is they love people promoting their line with artistic pictures - free advertising for them.

 

I was setting up for a panning time lapse on the Carnival Magic at daybreak towards the front on the port side. My panning timer looks menacing from a distance and when I glanced up at the bridge two officers had the big binoculars trained on me steady! They seemed satisfied all was well and left me to my project.

 

I thought it was humorous anyways...

 

IMGP0483.JPG

Edited by shootr
Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless you are directly violating some law, I find most people are pretty accommodating of photographers. I don't have direct experience with NCL's photography policies (which is to say, no one has ever told me I couldn't do something while on an NCL ship) but generally speaking, as long as it's not a potential safety or regulation hazard, you'll probably find that NCL is more than happy to go with it. Afterall, the best advertising is customer generated.

 

Also, just a friendly photography tip: I don't know what you are using equipment wise, but I can't emphasize the value in shooting in RAW and editing in a program like Lightroom or Photoshop. It can turn flat looking shots into really interesting pictures. Also, tastefully done HDR can got a really long way with what you were shooting. The color and varying focus points could really make for some great shots.

Edited by NoahtheRed
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup! RAW fixes everything! I accidentally left my camera at home once but was able to recover all the shots I would have taken 'cause I always shoot RAW!

 

Raw vs.JPEG? An endless debate. WARNING! This article contains facts!

 

http://www.pptphoto.com/articles/rawvsjpeg.html

 

;)

 

I have taken photos of just about every part of the ships accessible to passengers and have never had any negative response from the crew. If you are on the dock taking photos and there is a question, showing your sea pass as proof that you are a passenger will go a long way towards soothing any fears of photographic sabotage.

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yup! RAW fixes everything! I accidentally left my camera at home once but was able to recover all the shots I would have taken 'cause I always shoot RAW!

 

Raw vs.JPEG? An endless debate. WARNING! This article contains facts!

 

http://www.pptphoto.com/articles/rawvsjpeg.html

 

;)

 

 

 

After reading your article I am more than a little curious about raw photos. Do you have a before and after picture that you can post? I would love to see the differences.

 

Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes the wind is the problem.

 

And since you will not travel with your biggest and sturdiest tripod, long exposure was a problem for me :(

 

On my last cruise we had only one overnight in port...so I had to deal with light rain and high wind...managed to get about 25% of the shoots I wanted...

 

Guess now I have an excuse to cruise again soon !!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Cruise Critic Forums mobile app

Link to post
Share on other sites
After reading your article I am more than a little curious about raw photos. Do you have a before and after picture that you can post? I would love to see the differences.

 

Thanks

 

You won't necessarily see a huge difference without knowing what the difference actually is.

 

RAW files are exactly that....that raw, un-processed photo data. What your camera, any camera for that matter, produces when you snap the shutter button is essentially a RAW file (or something like it). Now, in 99.9% of cases, your camera then applies a small suite of processing elements. This processing suite will apply white balance adjustments, maybe some contrast/highlight balancing to try and develop the best dynamic range and such. Additionally, it applies a certain amount of compression. An 18 megapixel RAW file might be 17-25 mb in size, which after processing comes down to less than 10 mb. The end product of that is a JPEG. Essentially, your camera made (most of) the processing decisions for you. The results can range from "Great" to "ugh, let's try again".

 

NOW, if you set your camera to produce just the RAW file, you are basically cutting out that processing. The camera saves basically the entire data package, leaving all of the processing up to you.

 

This CAN be advantageous, but does not necessarily mean RAW = better. With some time and effort, you can really draw out some great pictures using a RAW editor (like Lightroom or Rawtherapee). The best comparison I can make is that a RAW file is like making pasta from scratch vs buying pasta. You CAN produce some great results from it, but theoretically, so can buying pasta. There is still quite a bit of customization you can do with a Jpeg, but there are certain elements you can't change or improve on that you can do with a RAW file.

 

One of the reasons I recommend it is because as the article pointed out, editing a RAW file is non-destructive. When I get my editing how I want it, I export it as a JPEG or PNG or whatever and have that....as well as the original RAW file. I can go back later and maybe change some of the color balance or clarity without losing anything in the process.

 

The nifty thing is A LOT of modern DSLRs can save your pics in both RAW and JPEG simultaneously. Wedding and sports photographers frequently use this combination so they can quickly get a small gallery together for final approval.

 

Things to keep in mind:

  • RAW will not automatically make your pictures better. It just gives you the ability to do all the processing yourself.
  • JPEGs are not inherently inferior to RAW. One of my favorite pictures that I took was in JPEG.
  • RAW files are friggin big. An 18mp RAW file will be between 17 and 25mb. If you plan to shoot in RAW or Jpeg AND RAW, prepare to get some memory.
  • RAW files require special editors. RAWtherapee is a fantastic free option, but others include Photoshop and Lightroom.
  • Nothing can fix not taking a picture, or bad composure, or out-of-focus.
  • A well exposed JPEG is better than an under or overexposed RAW file.
  • Instagram filters are the devil

 

When I get home from work, I'll post an examples of good comparisons between a JPEG and an edited RAW file. Both good and bad.

Edited by NoahtheRed
Link to post
Share on other sites
One of the reasons I recommend it is because as the article pointed out, editing a RAW file is non-destructive. When I get my editing how I want it, I export it as a JPEG or PNG or whatever and have that....as well as the original RAW file. I can go back later and maybe change some of the color balance or clarity without losing anything in the process.

 

In my article I also noted that editing a JPEG and saving to a copy nets the same result which is to leave the original untouched. Lightroom is very helpful in this as it will let you create an editing copy on the fly if you need to do heavy editing in an external editor or if you are simply touching up color, noise or cropping it will do the edits non-destructively and you can export a copy with the changes.

 

Lightroom has actually closed the gap between JPEG and RAW for me by letting me process RAW more easily when necessary and allowing adjustment of a JPEG with all the same tools it uses for RAW.

 

I say this a lot and it applies to software as well as hardware: It's a great time to be a photographer!

 

Dave

Edited by pierces
Link to post
Share on other sites
In my article I also noted that editing a JPEG and saving to a copy nets the same result which is to leave the original untouched. Lightroom is very helpful in this as it will let you create an editing copy on the fly if you need to do heavy editing in an external editor or if you are simply touching up color, noise or cropping it will do the edits non-destructively and you can export a copy with the changes.

 

Lightroom has actually closed the gap between JPEG and RAW for me by letting me process RAW more easily when necessary and allowing adjustment of a JPEG with all the same tools it uses for RAW.

 

I say this a lot and it applies to software as well as hardware: It's a great time to be a photographer!

 

Dave

 

Yeah, Lightroom is probably one of the best options for any kind of processing. It's one of the few things that Adobe got right (and this is coming from a guy that uses InDesign and Framemaker on daily basis).

 

Regardless of whether you shoot in RAW or Jpeg or some squirrely third party proprietary format, you should get familiar with the post-processing photography. Not only does it of course improve the quality of your photos, but it also helps you learn how light interacts with subjects. I've learned more about what I'm doing right and doing wrong when I shoot by editing than I could have on my own.

 

Plus it of course opens up whole other realms: HDR, astro-photo stacking, selective coloring, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok I know it's been a while but I just learned how to post pictures the way I wanted.

 

So I have a few from my Breakaway cruise from last November.

 

And no I did not have any trouble coming or going with the equipment on or off the ship.

 

p><p><img src=[/img]

 

p><p><img src=[/img]

 

This one I really like...the dreamy water and smoke from the engine

 

p><p><img src=IMG_1540_zpsa39e73d0.jpg' alt='IMG_1540_

 

Cant wait to sail again.

 

Very nice images! If you don't mind my asking, how long were the exposures on water slide photos?

Link to post
Share on other sites
My belief is they love people promoting their line with artistic pictures - free advertising for them.

 

I was setting up for a panning time lapse on the Carnival Magic at daybreak towards the front on the port side. My panning timer looks menacing from a distance and when I glanced up at the bridge two officers had the big binoculars trained on me steady! They seemed satisfied all was well and left me to my project.

 

I thought it was humorous anyways...

 

IMGP0483.JPG

 

I can see why the crew would take an interest in what you were doing. How did your pano turn out?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for reminding me!

 

Here's an example of a picture I took using RAW+JPEG.

13417199605_eecf53c004_b.jpg

This first example is one that came directly from my camera as a jpeg. It's not a bad picture by any stretch, but there's some detail lost in the shadows and perhaps some color that could be brought out...especially in the clouds. My camera did a pretty good job of handling the processing.

 

 

12033840105_07639ffe89_b.jpg

This is the same file, but edited in Lightroom from the RAW file. Ignoring the fringing in the upper right, there's a lot more color and detail going on. Why? Because I was able to edit it to bring those colors out more. I brightened the shadows and blacks, darkened the whites, increased the clarity and vibrance, and did some mild noise filtering in certain areas.

 

11020544663_74a849e2e6_h.jpg

 

Then there is this. This is a picture I took as jpeg, changed to black in white in the camera, and cropped on an Ipad.....but, it was one of like 20 shots that I sorted through and played with until I got what I wanted.

 

 

RAW = Baking using raw ingredients

JPEG = Baking using ready mix with eggs, milk, and frosting

 

You have a better chance of succeeding with the JPEG, but it's not going to have your own personal touch like editing the RAW file will. Try both. See what works.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Things to keep in mind:

  • RAW will not automatically make your pictures better. It just gives you the ability to do all the processing yourself.
  • JPEGs are not inherently inferior to RAW. One of my favorite pictures that I took was in JPEG.
  • RAW files are friggin big. An 18mp RAW file will be between 17 and 25mb. If you plan to shoot in RAW or Jpeg AND RAW, prepare to get some memory.
  • RAW files require special editors. RAWtherapee is a fantastic free option, but others include Photoshop and Lightroom.
  • A well exposed JPEG is better than an under or overexposed RAW file.

Because RAW files are bigger, the number of shots you can take in burst mode is probably a lot lower. My newest camera (a "pro" model) can do well over 100 in JPEG, but can only do 36-48 in RAW depending on the memory card. That also means in RAW I can "kill a gig" in about 4 seconds. :)

 

RAW allows much better detail recovery, and also allows better "mistaken exposure" recovery. It's not as simple as "once you go RAW, you never go back", but I'm now a 100% RAW shooter, and only do RAW+JPEG for certain projects on super-tight timeline.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was shooting on manual, had camera with apperture wide open.

 

Left the bar, and outside, I asked our driver to take a picture of us with the bar sign.

 

Forgot about the settings, and the pic came out just about total white / overexposed, could hardly make out a thing. Because I had it set for raw, I was able to adjust it and recover the photo. Honestly, it came out pretty crumby, however, better than the totally overexposed nothing that came out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Ran into this early this morning. Gives a pretty good overview of why RAW is popular.

 

Also, I shoot in manual the majority of the time, but almost always have ISO set to auto (max at 6400) and still regularly use Ap Priority as well. Also, RAW lets me set or adjust white balance in post, so that's pretty nifty as well. But to get to my point, regardless of what mode you shoot in normally...I highly recommend you at least learn how the exposure triangle works. It can go a long way to helping you achieve some shots that your camera wouldn't do on its own.

Edited by NoahtheRed
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Ran into this early this morning. Gives a pretty good overview of why RAW is popular.

 

Also, I shoot in manual the majority of the time, but almost always have ISO set to auto (max at 6400) and still regularly use Ap Priority as well. Also, RAW lets me set or adjust white balance in post, so that's pretty nifty as well. But to get to my point, regardless of what mode you shoot in normally...I highly recommend you at least learn how the exposure triangle works. It can go a long way to helping you achieve some shots that your camera wouldn't do on its own.

 

A good point. I would much rather brag about a well exposed, carefully composed shot that looks great right out of the camera than how lucky I was to be able to save a shot from my mistakes.

 

I used to shoot manual all the time with my Minolta SRT-102 ;) but these days I shoot mostly in A-mode and make use of the exposure compensation for fine tuning.

 

I agree that the trinity of exposure should be the first thing a photographer learns but there is a whole generation that never had to deal with it thanks to cameras with more brains than buttons and dials. Those brains have gotten better and better to the point where they can probably nail 95% of scenes they are presented with but for that remaining 5%, you will need to help the camera's tiny brain by using yours.

 

For the folks skimming these threads, here is an article I wrote about low-light photography that includes some basic info on how exposure works: http://www.pptphoto.com/articles/lowlight.html

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with RiverCruising, the River Cruise Experts
      • Q&A: Cruise Insurance with Steve Dasseos of TripInsuranceStore.com
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...