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Dr. rdsqrl's Renaissance Passage: Review of the Pacific's Rome to FLL

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The short version:

Perfect ship.

Perfect itinerary.

Perfect weather.

 

Wait, you want more? Okay, you asked for it.

 

I’ll arrange this review topically and try to avoid a day-by-day thing, since so many of the days were sea days and plus I don’t want to bore you to tears, especially if you read my live thread (copies of which can be purchased in the Gift Shop). So, there will be a Prelude, a Pre-Cruise, a Meet the Pacific Princess, Ports sections, and Summary, in which I'll include all the stuff I forgot to put in earlier.

 

I can guarantee you I’ll finish this faster than the cruise itself; I can’t guarantee it’ll be as entertaining. And I will include photos, with my usual disclaimer: I have only had my digital camera on one “real” vacation (this one) and have maybe used it before this to take a grand total of perhaps 60 photos. So I’m barely novice level. And I think the Auto setting was off for many of the first photos, so they look a little wonky, dark and maybe even blurry. And slanted. Or else my camera got jet-lagged. So, adjust your expectations downward re photo quality. They’re images of what I saw, not great art.

 

Prelude: My age and marital status are not germane (why on early do people include those?). Those of you who don’t already know me only need to know that I’m incurably snarky and do not take myself too seriously. Especially not on holiday. I will never lie or intentionally misrepresent anything: the improbable only sounds that way because other people in this world are very odd.

Pre-Cruise: I flew to Rome on USAir using United Mileage Plus miles (no, it doesn’t make any sense to me, either). Suffice it to say, there’s a reason business-class seats were available on USAir but not UA. Also, the Philadelphia gate agents have no idea how to control a crowd. When they called for pre-boarding for business class, every single person in the lounge got up and stormed the podium. Unbelievable; I’ve never seen such pushing and shoving – but, in fairness, they were standing between me and my pre-take-off glass of champagne.

 

The flight itself was okay, although now I know which airline gave airline food its bad reputation. Luckily, post-traumatic stress has caused me to forget the menu particulars, but you know it’s bad when the best part of the meal was the salt and pepper from the little shakers. They had some television programming, which I always prefer over movies on planes. The sound is never good enough or the screen large enough to follow a movie’s plot, but a telly program doesn’t require the same level of commitment and attention. I watched an episode of “House Hunters” during dinner, then found a movie I’ve seen already, so it didn’t matter if I couldn’t hear all the dialogue/see the tiny screen properly. Then I actually fell asleep for a couple hours, much to my surprise.

 

My seatmate was a priest. In Business Class. I think someone missed the day in seminary when they went over the whole "vow of poverty" thing.

 

We landed in Rome on time, my luggage appeared very quickly, and the line for passport control was tolerable. Once through, my driver from RomeCabs was right there where they said he would be, a cheerful guy named Bob, who spoke excellent English and happily pointed out some sights as we drove into the city. I also used RomeCabs for the transfer to Civitavecchia (although that driver was not as cheerful or fun as Bob). I highly recommend them – both cars were right on time, both were safe drivers, and the booking confirmation process was easy and efficient.

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Well I am very happy to be the first one to read your review!

Perfect ship huh?!

 

Horray!

 

Later,

Norris

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I’d been to Rome before on a cruise, but this was my first actual stay in the city. I was at the Albergo del Senato. Fantastic. Really, I have nothing bad to say about it at all. The location is phenomenal – this was the view from my window (room 306):

 

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And the room itself:

 

 

 

 

Be warned if you’re nitpicker about noise: there is noise. It’s on a busy piazza, which the days of my stay featured vociferous political demonstrations between what appeared to be rival gangs of older people: the AARP v. the Gray Panthers?

 

 

 

 

Anyway, the utter charm of the hotel and the million-dollar views plus the feeling of being a resident of Renaissance Rome are worth any amount of noise. I wholeheartedly recommend it, and would happily spend twice what I paid to stay here again.

 

It even has a nice little bar in the lobby, open until 11. I’m not sure why that sounded so late to me, but I guess I wasn’t expecting one at all. I will say that as a solo woman traveler, I have absolutely no hesitation in doing almost anything or going almost anywhere by myself, except going out drinking alone after dinner. So a hotel bar is always welcome. But it’s all about location, really, and del Senato is easily walkable to nearly everywhere you want to go, from the Piazza Navona to the Spanish Steps to the Forum/Coliseum.

 

Plus, there are lots of cute little restaurants nearby. Here are my two picks: La Sacrestia, Via Seminario and Osteria Agrippa, Via dei Cestari – both are within a couple blocks of del Senato. The latter featured a special of mushroom and truffle pasta which was superlative. I also had gelato at San Crispino, which is a block north of the Pantheon. I’m not an ice cream person, but, you know, when in Rome. San Crispino was a Rick Steves recommendation and I went with it – the chocolate was delicious and I’m glad I only discovered the glories of Roman gelato on my last night there. So big ups to that annoying Rick Steves and to San Crispino.

 

So, on day one, my room wasn’t ready (well, it was only around 10 when I arrived), so I whisked into the Senato’s ladies room to freshen up, then left my stuff with the nice porter and went out to explore. I did a Rick Steves walking tour from the Pantheon’s piazza to the Spanish Steps,

 

 

checking out the Trevi Fountain (uh-oh, I forgot to throw a coin in . . . ),

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enjoying the buskers at the foot of the steps, and doing some window-shopping along the Via Veneto and then back along the Via del Corso. Someone forgot to pack her strappy sandals for formal night and was hoping to replace the boring black pumps she luckily had at her mother’s house for “emergencies” and brought with her. No luck, but I did see some beautiful leather jackets that had me drooling.

 

To be continued....

Edited by rdsqrl

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<<The flight itself was okay, although now I know which airline gave airline food its bad reputation. Luckily, post-traumatic stress has caused me to forget the menu particulars, but you know it’s bad when the best part of the meal was the salt and pepper from the little shakers.>>

 

Annie, I have never flown on US Air but had heard tell that they have some of the best salt and pepper shakers in the skies. Who was the Maitre d' on the flight?

 

I usually fly United as they own Chicago and have a very catchy jingle tune and the food on board is very good,especially in Business Class where the wine flows freely.

 

I am on board for the rest of your review-or was that it?- this is an eagerly anticipated review if ever there was one as I am booked on that beautiful little ship for a Venice to Rome in September. I will need full particulars of the Albergo del Senato hotel as I have booked two nights there in a PH suite.

 

Trusting you are going to stay up all night writing so that my lust for information can be sated.

 

Yours truly,

 

Norris

in Chicago

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Sorry, Norris, not gonna stay up all night -- no more all-nighters now that I've done dissertating. I'll be back with more tomorrow. Trust me, I'll be finished well before your September trip.

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What am I doing wrong? the pictures are not showing!:(

 

I enjoyed the "live from" and I'll look forward to more from you.:)

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What am I doing wrong? the pictures are not showing!:(

They were there about 30 minutes ago but the photos are now gone for me also. :confused:

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no pics showing for me either.

 

Loving this as much as I enjoyed the Live thread... will be on board this jewel of a ship in 4 and a half months!!!

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Annie something has gone astray with your posted pictures :eek: and I really want to see them. Where's Pam when one needs her? ;)

 

Barb

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I think that the whole "everyone rushes to be the first one on, regardless of boarding zone" is unique (or at least amplified) for international flights. I've seen it several times at Dulles for international flights and while people may crowd around the gate for domestics, they're pretty good about waiting to board until their zone is called. I also found it strange when SAS announced that people should not lay down and sleep on the floor of the plane. And then the woman across the aisle did so.

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Have always enjoyed your posts and am really looking forward to your continued adventures. Hope the glitch with the photos gets straightened out. Happy New Year early!

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Hooray!!

 

The long awaited review.

 

Loved your "Live"

 

Judy

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I'm gonna love this thread, since I have booked the same (or similar) itinerary on the Ocean for next year, and also, I sometimes travel solo. Doing so in Eurorpe was rather intimidating at first, but I'm getting better about it.

 

I'm more than ready for the next installment!!! And I need to find your "live from"!

 

Mary Lou

Edited by flamomo

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I had to pull the photos because they posted with a tag line that I couldn't delete, which linked to my Flickr account. I love you guys, but my entire photo collection is not meant to be shared with the whole world. So unless someone can tell me how to post without having that tag, I'll have to create a whole new Flickr account and transfer in just for the photos I choose for this review. And that will take time. So bear with me, 'kay. I shall resume reviewing once that is done.

 

I hate technology; it never works for me the way it's supposed to. And I do miss Webshots . . . never had this drama with them.

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Okay, here are the missing photos (I hope):

 

Albergo del Senato Room 306:

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View from room 306:

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Trevi Fountain, featuring random guy's bald head. He literally waited until he saw my finger pressing down on the button and then leaned forward deliberately. :

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The next day, I explored the Pantheon, which was beautiful. Yes, the hole in the top is open in all weather, and there are drainage holes in the floor, as pictured below.

 

 

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This is one of my favourite photos from Rome:

 

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I had an early lunch -- a delicious tonno panini from a stall in the Piazza Navona.

 

My seat for lunch:

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The whole piazza was lined with stalls, I think it must have been a Christmas market or something, because I don’t recall them being there the last time I was in Rome. These candies looked too lovely to eat:

 

 

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After my quick Panini, and deliberately ignoring the Rome Museum at the south end of the piazza (I love museums, but not at the expense of time spent walking the streets and seeing the outdoor sights), I walked to the Forum. What seemed like it might have been a long walk was actually not bad. I paused halfway at the Largo di Torre Argentina, which is a site uncovered in the 1920s, I believe, when excavations began for a new apartment block. Among the goodies it features are first-century temples and the site of the theatre where Julius Caesar met his untimely end (between Caesar and Lincoln, you'd think rulers would learn how dangerous it is to frequent live theatre. Much better to stay home and watch Frasier re-runs.)

 

 

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It also features lots of homeless cats, with a little office at the southwest corner where one can go adopt a cat. Why one would want to do that is a mystery to me, but I hear there exist people who voluntarily choose to invite a cat into their homes. The cats seem nice enough, but I'm not really a cat person; however, I include a photo to make the feline-fanciers among us happy.

 

 

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I feel sure that this guy knew exactly how I feel about cats -- just look at that expression on his face:

 

 

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A bakery I passed along the way. I heroically resisted the urge to go in and taste test the goodies:

 

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At last, I see this, and realize I'm almost at the Forum.

 

 

 

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And then I see a familiar sight down at the end of the road:

 

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I've been to the Coliseum before, so was going to concentrate on the Forum this trip. However, it still is exciting and gives you chills to see it in person, even for the third or fourth or fifth time.

 

So, I’m a big fan of the Lindsay Davis novels, a series about a first-century Roman detective. Most of the books take place around 70 AD or during the time of the Emperor Vaspasian. Anyway, it was very exciting to be in the place these fictional characters inhabit. Yeah, yeah, real people/real history, too. I know all that, none better.

 

 

 

They practically had to throw me out of there at closing time. With the early sunset of winter, most of the sites close at 4.30 with last admission at 3.30, and they begin herding people out at 4, so something to bear in mind if you go at this time of year. I had plenty of time to see everything but if you’re in a group, even of two people, you might need more than four hours to do it all.

 

 

The Forum totally exceeded my expectations (which could have been the theme for this trip!). Really, one runs out of superlatives, and I still have to save some to talk about Pompeii and Herculaneum! So here are some pretty pictures instead, while I go peruse the thesaurus for synonyms for amazing:

 

 

Our unlucky theatre-goer:

 

 

11614801536_3a0033dffc_z.jpg

Edited by rdsqrl

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Ugh, lost the last half of that post.

 

Yes, I know the sun is at his back and you can't see any detail. I was going for an artistic effect. Ha. No, really -- My lack of photographic expertise was exacerbated by the low winter sun (hey, that would make a great title for a brooding detective television show, maybe one set in a gritty urban environment. Wait, what's that? Oh. Never mind.) which made photography challenging. Just something to keep in mind when you take this trip next year.

 

Arch of Titus:

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Built to commemorate the Roman victory over Judea in 60-ishAD, this detail from the interior left-side of the arch shows the fleeing Jews; note the menorah:

 

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From the center of the arch, looking down at the Forum:

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Just a random bit of junk. I loved this place!

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Some temple or another (okay, okay, I'll look it up. Just hold your chariot horses.): **The Temple of Castor and Pollux" -- or so say my notes.**

 

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I really liked the light in this one; too bad I got the metal fence in the foreground. Sigh.

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The most popular place in the Forum, then and now, I imagine -- the House of the Vestal Virgins. Here is the courtyard. Note the statues: these are of "famous" vestals. Not sure what one had to do to earn a statue here. I was too busy processing what happened to you if you were found not actually to be a virgin. Suffice it to say it involved bread, a lamp, and being buried alive. Unpleasant. I think I could resist even George Clooney under those circumstances. Maybe.

 

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Edited by rdsqrl

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The Pantheon at night. Well, duh. Why do photo captions always veer to the blindingly obvious? Let me see if I can liven this up. This was taken on my last night in Rome, whilst juggling my camera, my gloves (it had gotten quite chilly), and my chocolate gelato, while keeping my shoulder bag away from the nose of a very curious horse, who I think was practicing for promotion from carriage-horse to pick-pocket.

 

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I had a fabulous time in Rome. I loved it when I first went, 20 years ago, far more than I liked Florence (I know, heresy; everyone is supposed to love Florence), and I still love it. I love the history, the narrow streets, the wild traffic. I love the way you cross the street, by stepping off the curb and making firm eye contact with the oncoming drivers – so much easier than waiting for a silly little “walk” light! I loved all the little espresso bars (even though I did miss Starbucks. What can I say, I’m a coffee philistine.) and the little stalls where people do their real grocery shopping . . .

 

 

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and the outdoor restaurant seating, even in winter; and the food – omg, the food. Sigh. I want to go back. I'm really worried about that whole forgetting the coin in the fountain thing.

 

Taking a break for the night now. Tomorrow, we board the Pacific Princess.

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Annie I'm delighted you got your picture posting dilemma resolved. Now all of us seating in the orchestra section can stow our baskets of rotten tomatoes beneath our seats and enjoy the show. Your pictures are wonderful and the accompanying dialogue is well.... it's just pure "Annie" and we love it! :D

 

Barb

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Loving the photos .... quite a few of which are of places I visited a year ago, and seeing them make me want to be back there RIGHT NOW!!

The ones of the Forum are calling me to come see the place in person.

 

Thanks for the heads up about the light issues for photo taking at this time of year.

 

Please keep 'em coming, along with your wonderful narration.

 

Mary Lou

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Annie, Really! You are in Rome where the coffee is sublime and you miss STARBUCKS!!!!

 

Love the location of your hotel. I was standing there only last year.... loved Rome but I am sorry, I am one of the majority that loves Florence! :D

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Meet the Pacific Princess.

 

 

I adored my cruises on the two original Love Boats, although it’s been 11 years since I was on a ship that small. In the interim, I’ve sailed on every class of Princess ship (excluding the new Royal; don’t hold your breath on that one) and enjoyed the amenities on all of them: freshwater pools, aft pools/aft public decks, lots of lounges/bars for variety, wrap-around promenade decks, International Cafes, etc. etc. So while I was very much looking forward to the small-ship experience I had loved a decade+ ago, part of me wondered if I would miss some of the things from the big ship. Honesty compels me to say . . . NO WAY! (Well, okay, I did miss having a freshwater pool.) I remembered everything about why I loved the smaller ship – the way you get to know the crew and the way they get to know you, the way you get to know your fellow passengers (for good or ill, there’s no hiding or being anonymous). The way you can pop back to your cabin to drop something off you bought on impulse at the ship’s store and not have to pack a lunch and hire a Sherpa . . .

 

The Pacific is a gorgeous ship, inside and out. Photos of her exterior don’t do her justice: I’ve always thought she looked kind of boxy and plain, but in person, she has lovely lines and looks just right.

 

 

 

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The interior is so different from the other Princess ships that it’s at once odd and welcome. One minor thing I really liked: not having cabin doors paired up – that really seemed to keep noise down, as your neighbours weren’t right there in your face, so to speak, as they came and went from their cabin.

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Speaking of which, I had 4002, the second-from-the-front oceanview cabin on (duh) deck 4.

 

 

 

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Very nice cabin, indeed. There was a pillow-top mattress – I know this not because I looked, but because the silly flat sheet that they use as a bottom sheet came untucked nearly every night. Either dear Stewart, Leo, didn’t know how to make a bed properly or else I unmake beds in my sleep. Big window with a lovely deep windowsill, excellent for extra storage. Cabin Steward #2 used it for the bedliner and throw pillows at turndown (yes, I had 3 cabin stewards – don’t ask).

 

Of course, we all know by now that on the little girls, even the steerage cabins have sofas. Never been a big deal to me until this cruise. I think partly because the first few days were so exhausting from my pre-cruise walking and then the two full days of excursions, and partly because those first few days were chilly. Whatever the reason, I did find myself on my sofa during the day reading with my feet propped up on the desk bench more than a few times. And it was nice to have my evening pillow chocolate/Love Boat watching/Patter reading routine whilst seated on a sofa instead of propped up on a bed.

 

 

 

However, FYI to people who go on and on about flat-screens (what is it with this obsession anyway?): the picture on a flat screen is distorted unless you’re eye-level with the screen – which, on this ship, you decidedly are not when you are seated on the sofa – unless your eyes are located about 2 feet higher than mine. So the Love Boat looked like it suffered from a lack of interior lighting and Julie had black hair instead of blonde.

 

The closet space was much less than on the other ships, and I found the doors annoying to continually have to open and close. This was my only complaint, though. I really liked having the safe right there at the desk, so much easier to put on jewelry with the mirror at hand.

 

Most of all, I really, really, really liked this location. It was nice and bouncy here, and was away from the bustle of the elevator lobby. There was a crew door just past cabin 4000, with what I assume were crew cabins forward the rest of the deck, so there was some considerable traffic up and down the corridor. Not enough to disturb, but I’m noting it. Also, opposite cabin 4000 was a steward closet.

 

 

 

On this ship, a cabin near the elevator lobby is not a good choice: everything is on a smaller scale than the bigger ships, so cabin 4018’s door was Right There, just 8 feet from the elevator door – I imagine those people heard the elevator dings night and day.

 

 

 

Also, you might want to avoid 4026 – you’d be right across the hall from the Medical Center, and unless you want to meet a handsome Jewish doctor (in which case, you’d be on the wrong ship, as the doctor is a lovely Gentile woman), you’ll have a front-row seat for sick call every morning and afternoon.

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On embarkation day, there was a team decorating the ship for, oh, what’s that holiday? It’s in all the papers . . . . The décor was understated but okay – mostly in shades of red and white. Not as pretty as I’ve seen on other ships, but then the décor on the Pacific is so rich, you really need to do something more outstanding than red and white to make seasonal decorations pop.

 

 

 

 

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Here are some public room photos:

Aft stairwell [note blue carpet; the forward stairwell has red carpet]:

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Carousel Bar:

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Casino Bar:

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Club Bar, or site of the pre-dinner martini:

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The second-to-last day, as I mentioned in my live, all the seating beyond the bar (from the second lamp back to the wall) was removed and replaced with tables displaying gingerbread houses. Ridiculous waste of precious space. I could hardly squeeze in to get my pre-dinner martini (thank goodness for those childhood games of tackle football with the other neighbourhood kids).

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Panorama Buffet entrance and bar which made the better mochas:

 

 

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More buffet:

 

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This was the dessert section and further along, past that guy, is the salad bar:

 

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Pacific Lounge, home of my trivia triumphs ["Victory is mine!" -Stewie Griffin]:

 

 

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This was also the late-night dj space. Just dj, bartender(s) and me most nights . . .

Edited by rdsqrl

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Pool, running/walking track:

 

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Promenade Deck:

 

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It was small, to be sure, but still a relaxing place to have that late-afternoon mocha and read and watch the sunset. Some chilly nights out there for the first part of the cruise.

 

And my favourite room, the Library:

 

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I shall have more to say about the ship, but let’s move on to …

 

 

 

Ports: Naples.

This was definitely the highlight for me on this itinerary. I was thrilled to be seeing Pompeii and Herculaneum, and managed to squeeze both of them in, thanks to the generosity of my brother, who gifted me the two Princess shore excursions, morning in Pompeii and afternoon in Herculaneum. On my own using the train I would have done one or the other, worried about timing, so it was nice to be “forced” to do both. While Pompeii is huge and there is a lot of see, I felt that our guide was good and we saw a great deal. H. of course is much smaller and there, a half-day is definitely sufficient.

 

Both tours included a stop at a cameo factory, albeit not the same one. I used the bathroom at the first one; I stayed on the bus and read during the afternoon stop.

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So let’s start with Pompeii:

Incredible. I can’t imagine why anyone wastes time on any other excursion when they could go to Pompeii. It’s really awe-inspiring, although not at first. You enter by walking along a huge wall of volcanic rock, and then find yourself in the amphitheatre, which just could be any old place. It’s only gradually that the enormity of the tragedy begins to hit you, as you walk and walk and walk along streets past ruin after ruin.

 

 

 

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I loved the bits of frescoed wall still visible, even some graffiti.

 

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But it was the floor mosaics that really hit home – that these floors were the same ones walked on by people 2000 years ago. Amazing.

 

 

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This was a nice Roman villa’s courtyard:

 

 

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Part of a wall fresco -- note the flowers and what looks like the Geico gekko:

 

 

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The anteroom [i don't remember the Latin name; feel free to look it up yourselves], with the pool to catch rainwater:

 

 

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I did not take photos of the brothel because the crowd there was too much to fight through. One funny thing: every time our guide mentioned the brothel, this older woman would start muttering “Disgusting” and “I’ve had about enough of this.” I’m not sure what got her knickers in a twist, but Church Lady eventually went and sat down on a paving stone and stewed in her own outrage.

 

Speaking of paving stones, a road with tracks worn in the stones from the iron cart wheels and the elevated stones for crossing wet streets:

 

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One thing to be mindful of in Pompeii as you walk around is how the sidewalks can go from a typical six inches higher than the road to a foot higher or even two feet. At some crossings, it requires leaping skills and balance to navigate from curb to crossing or down to street level.

 

Note the reflective white chips in the road – they’re designed to give illumination at night. Very clever, those ancient Romans.

 

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Rome has cats; Pompeii has dogs. These two approached one another, met up nose to nose, and licked one another’s nuzzles. In unison, my tour group all said, “ahhhh.” Funny.

 

 

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Finally, we arrived in the forum.

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Note Vesuvius back there, brooding over the town. It’s very close; can you imagine the horror of that nice mountain literally in your backyard suddenly come to life?

 

Best quotation of the day: as we foregather at the meeting point outside the site itself, one of our group rushes up to the guide and says, “I lost my husband in the Forum!” How many times over the centuries has that been said? She found him; we all were present and accounted for and headed back to the pier.

Edited by rdsqrl

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I was on the PP in October-November, then spent five days in Rome, so your experience was the opposite direction from mine. I recommend the Best Western Spring House, a stone's throw from the Vatican Museums. I also used RomeCabs this spring getting off the Ocean Princess, it went well.

 

I certainly agree with you regarding the better mochas to be found at the Panorama Bar, the guy I see in the background there does a very good job with them.

 

I think you meant to label the large venue as the Caberet Lounge.

 

I also did Pompeii from Naples. I did it on my own. You are right. it is huge.

Edited by Wehwalt

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Herculaneum was next, after a quick lunch and a change of shoes. I don’t like wearing tennis shoes but this afternoon, I was glad I had. I’m not sure if it rained earlier, but places in H. were kind of muddy and icky, so bear that in mind when you go.

 

Unlike Pompeii, where you are above modern-day ground level, in H., you’re below it – I believe the guide said 27 meters, but I don’t speak metric, so it might have been 27 furlongs or 27 fathoms. Anyway, here’s a nice view of it, and then a view of the walkway you come in on:

 

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We had a different guide for this afternoon, of course, and he was younger and more handsome than the morning’s Pompeii guide, so I for one enjoyed the commentary immensely. He also spent a good bit of the bus ride over to H. talking about how poor Naples was misunderstood and really wasn’t such a bad place. By the time he was done, I felt so guilty that I was ready to buy a second home in downtown Naples.

 

Herculaneum is definitely better preserved, or preserved in a different way, than Pompeii: ash versus rock falling, which meant that roofs didn't cave in. It’s smaller (only about 25% has been excavated) and you get a more human sense of what life was like there, since lots of wood and other bits remain. The first sight was the boathouses, complete with skeletons. I didn’t realize that’s what they were until I had taken the photo, so sorry. I have a policy against photographing dead bodies; it seems disrespectful (which is why I don’t have any photos of the mummified casts from Pompeii). Anyway, I liked the boathouses architecturally, so I decided not to delete the photo.

 

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11614300553_f766db64cc_z.jpg

 

 

 

 

The colours are still so vivid:

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Here is a beautiful wall mosaic from the temple:

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My favourite food stall. These stalls were all over Pompeii, too, but this one in H. was quite the largest we saw.

 

 

 

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The famous wine shop with its menu. Sadly, the bartender was on a break.

 

 

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