Jump to content
luv2gamble

Alaska staying warm w my ELECTRIC BLANKET

Recommended Posts

Maybe its crazy! I was thinking about packing my electric blanket and a power strip to use on my balcony. I hear its hours going through the glacier and is approx 25 degrees. I can picture myself nicely wrapped up snug w my blanket on high having a drink on my balcony watching the glaciers/icebergs. Or for any cold temps during cruise. At least I know I will be warm:D Any thoughts? Would the blanket work in the electrical outlet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three quick points. First, every cruise we've ever taken has been in a stateroom with a balcony, and I don't ever recall having a power outlet on a balcony.

 

Second, on every cruise which we've taken which has a potential for cool weather there have been throws available for passenger use. While it depends on which cruise line as to where they will be located, look on the pool decks in the general direction of the pool towel bins.

 

Third, I strongly doubt that the ambient air temperature will be twenty-five degrees. I've seen your posts on the Alaska CC forum and don't remember what month you will be heading to our state, but please understand that I have been at Hubbard Glacier when absolutely no jacket was needed and folks were applying sunscreen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, you'll see only a fraction of the glorious scenery from your balcony! The open deck -- or, at least, a large windowed area -- is best for viewing the glaciers.

 

In 3 Alaska cruises (all included Glacier Bay), I've never experienced 25* temps. On one trip, it was 80+ in Juneau!

 

Do take a warm hat, gloves, windbreaker & poncho -- they take much less suitcase space than a blanket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the NCL website section on prohibited items (under Guest Conduct):

 

"ITEMS WITH HEATING ELEMENTS OR OPEN FLAMES

Certain items that generate heat or produce an open flame are not permitted onboard. This includes clothing irons, hotplates, candles, incense and any other item that may create a fire hazard. Curling irons and hair dryers are allowed and may require a converter."

 

While it doesn't specifically mention electric blankets, it could very well be confiscated. That's in addition to the added problems of no outlets on the balcony and the additional risk of having to use an extension cord. Please don't put yourself, your fellow passengers, and the ship at risk!

Edited by Kartgv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Convenience electrical outlets are at the desk not on the balcony. Assuming there is a 120V AC outlet (very likely on ships filled with Americans) the AC may be on 50 cycles and not 60. There is also the issue of flammability and electrical integrity. They might assume you will use it in bed as well as on your balcony. Most lines will require that anything electrical be inspected before it can be used - not just for safety but also for compatibility of the item with the ship electrical system. Assuming your electric blanket "passes" the ship is not going to provide you with a suitable extension cord. And your balcony door won't close properly with a cord running through to the outside.

 

If you fear that it might me too cold to enjoy your balcony get a nice warm stadium blanket. Some high-tech fabrics now provide a lot of warmth with very little bulk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I was told the ports are quite warmer but passing the glaciers I was told 25 or so. I was also told 25 or so for when I land w the helicopter on Mendenhall glacier. I'm the Jewels first cruise to Alaska this year May 17th. I already put together a heavy winter coat, ear muffs, gloves, scarf, and I even bought feet warmers that people use when they skii. So many people said to dress warm or I would freeze in those areas. OMG! So confusing. I hear dress in layers from very warm to a short sleeve shirt. Bring boots, dont bring boots LOL..Now Im totally confused. I really dont want to over pack w all this stuff if not necessary. Well, it did make sense to me that it would be cold around glaciers and icebergs? Hmmm....dnk what to do now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Convenience electrical outlets are at the desk not on the balcony. Assuming there is a 120V AC outlet (very likely on ships filled with Americans) the AC may be on 50 cycles and not 60. There is also the issue of flammability and electrical integrity. They might assume you will use it in bed as well as on your balcony. Most lines will require that anything electrical be inspected before it can be used - not just for safety but also for compatibility of the item with the ship electrical system. Assuming your electric blanket "passes" the ship is not going to provide you with a suitable extension cord. And your balcony door won't close properly with a cord running through to the outside.

 

If you fear that it might me too cold to enjoy your balcony get a nice warm stadium blanket. Some high-tech fabrics now provide a lot of warmth with very little bulk.

 

OMG! Never thought of that. It was just a quick idea I put on thread. I WILL NOT be bringing the blanket. Thanks to the quick thinking of the posters. But Im still confused about the temp around glaciers and it seems I maybe over packing according to all you guys?? If they give a wrap, like the post said, maybe good enough, i dnk?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you to all the above posters for your concern and great opinions. I will take all of your advise. whew....glad I posted this:eek:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my experience, it's windy & a bit damp in Glacier Bay, so you feel colder -- that's why the windbreaker/poncho OVER your layers. And you always have the option of going inside for a while to warm up.

 

[i say that remembering that I stayed out on deck (w/very short bathroom breaks) for over 10 hrs. on one Glacier Bay trip!]

 

I've never landed on Mendenall Glacier but I'd expect sturdy shoes (textured soles) & 1-2 pair of warm socks would work as well as boots -- and for walking in ports w/o all the socks -- less to pack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our day in Tracey Arm viewing the glaciers was fabulous and the weather was cool but no where near cold as 25 degrees F. We didn't even particularly need our gloves..... mid June.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In my experience, it's windy & a bit damp in Glacier Bay, so you feel colder -- that's why the windbreaker/poncho OVER your layers. And you always have the option of going inside for a while to warm up.

 

[i say that remembering that I stayed out on deck (w/very short bathroom breaks) for over 10 hrs. on one Glacier Bay trip!]

 

I've never landed on Mendenall Glacier but I'd expect sturdy shoes (textured soles) & 1-2 pair of warm socks would work as well as boots -- and for walking in ports w/o all the socks -- less to pack.

 

Thanks, A windbreaker is a good idea:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoever told you to dress in layers was right. We were on Alaska cruise mid-June, and the weather was from cold rain (sweater, windbreaker) to sunny and nice (t-shirts at some stops).

 

We needed something warm on the day of scenic cruising. Of course we wanted to be outside to hear the docent talk, it was windy, everybody bundled up the best they could.

 

We didn't take the helicopter tour, so can't advise there.

 

Yes, packing for Alaska is a bit tricky. You need to be ready for any weather, plus formal clothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We cruised Alaska last September and it was beautiful in the ports. Cruising through Glacier Bay was FREEZING!!!! We were in full winter gear and brought our cabin comforter up to the Lido deck when viewing or out on our balcony. Have a fantastic trip!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We started our Glacier Bay day on one of the forward decks - the wind from the ship's movement made it very COLD. We wore our winter jackets, long underwear & ski gloves. We ended that same Glacier Bay day in the OUTDOOR swimming pool & hot tub (more protected midships) watching the glaciers glide by.

 

You never can tell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Convenience electrical outlets are at the desk not on the balcony. Assuming there is a 120V AC outlet (very likely on ships filled with Americans) the AC may be on 50 cycles and not 60. There is also the issue of flammability and electrical integrity. They might assume you will use it in bed as well as on your balcony. Most lines will require that anything electrical be inspected before it can be used - not just for safety but also for compatibility of the item with the ship electrical system. Assuming your electric blanket "passes" the ship is not going to provide you with a suitable extension cord. And your balcony door won't close properly with a cord running through to the outside.

 

If you fear that it might me too cold to enjoy your balcony get a nice warm stadium blanket. Some high-tech fabrics now provide a lot of warmth with very little bulk.

 

I believe most ships are 60 cycles. However, the difference between cycles does not affect a resistance heating element like a blanket. The difference between 50 and 60 cycles only affects the speed that a motor runs at. As you say, and as most lines state, nothing with a heating element, other than hair care appliances are allowed. And to run a cord through the balcony door will shut off the A/C in the cabin (off when door open), and while you won't want a/c, the heated air for the ship is through the same system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, I was told the ports are quite warmer but passing the glaciers I was told 25 or so. I was also told 25 or so for when I land w the helicopter on Mendenhall glacier. I'm the Jewels first cruise to Alaska this year May 17th. I already put together a heavy winter coat, ear muffs, gloves, scarf, and I even bought feet warmers that people use when they skii. So many people said to dress warm or I would freeze in those areas. OMG! So confusing. I hear dress in layers from very warm to a short sleeve shirt. Bring boots, dont bring boots LOL..Now Im totally confused. I really dont want to over pack w all this stuff if not necessary. Well, it did make sense to me that it would be cold around glaciers and icebergs? Hmmm....dnk what to do now?

 

When we went the week of May 17th our day in Glacier Bay was nowhere near 25degrees. It was closer to 50 and I was comfortable with silky long johns under my slacks and a turtleneck under my fleece-lined denim jacket. I had one pair of thick socks in leather walking shoes. Hat, scarf, and gloves protected my extremities. I didn't even use the blanket provided.

Edited by NMLady

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When we went the week of May 17th our day in Glacier Bay was nowhere near 25degrees. It was closer to 50 and I was comfortable with silky long johns under my slacks and a turtleneck under my fleece-lined denim jacket. I had one pair of thick socks in leather walking shoes. Hat, scarf, and gloves protected my extremities. I didn't even use the blanket provided.

 

Wow, that's a lot to wear for 50.:) Here in Maine, that's a bright, clear beautiful spring day, and we're out in the yard in shirtsleeves, if not shorts.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In fact, its 50 today, and I'm working in the yard in shirtsleeves!

 

The thing about glaciers is that they are not where they are at sea level because its so cold. Its because way up high where it is cold, the ice is forming, and pushing down. The ice is so massive, and so self-insulating that the amount that melts cannot be noticed. Now, if you were on one of the zodiac boat tours (not sure if they can run those anymore) that went right in close to the glacier, yes, you'll notice a dramatic temperature drop.

 

So, while the air will be comfortable, the water will not be, since it has ice floating in it, like your drink.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, I was told the ports are quite warmer but passing the glaciers I was told 25 or so. I was also told 25 or so for when I land w the helicopter on Mendenhall glacier. I'm the Jewels first cruise to Alaska this year May 17th. I already put together a heavy winter coat, ear muffs, gloves, scarf, and I even bought feet warmers that people use when they skii. So many people said to dress warm or I would freeze in those areas. OMG! So confusing. I hear dress in layers from very warm to a short sleeve shirt. Bring boots, dont bring boots LOL..Now Im totally confused. I really dont want to over pack w all this stuff if not necessary. Well, it did make sense to me that it would be cold around glaciers and icebergs? Hmmm....dnk what to do now?

 

Be an Onion, Dress in Layers.

 

For Glacier Bay (or similar) the air temp wasn't all that cold but the wind chill was nasty. Even this SoCal girl was warm enough in jeans, layered tops (including a long sleeved one), overjacket, knit cap and knit gloves. Just make sure your cap/hat covers your ears.

 

We flew to the glacier and went dogsledding. On the glacier it's the same, but can be less windy, depending on where you go. Although the year we went we were dressed too warm. We even saw a gal wearing a denim mini skirt up there.:rolleyes:

For this trip you exchange your shoes for special 'glacier boots'. You also put all your stuff into lockers. I would take a 2 day supply of any meds you need, JIC. I have heard very rare reports of people stuck up there because of fog.

 

Check weather.com

 

One year it was pushing 80F and we wore capirs and Ts. The other it was 40 and wet. DH took the teens snorkeling in Ketchikan when it was 40 and wet. Even in the rain we just wore our sneakers.

 

Which line are you sailing? HAL has wonderful woolen blankets, as does Carnival.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We did a trip in May and yes, it can be very chilly , but nothing a good all weather jacket and warm sweater underneath does not fix. Yes,a hat and mitts are a good idea. My best trick...take a thermal coffee mug, fill it with a couple of shots of baileys or liquor of your choice - you can order a bottle to your room cheaper than buying shots :) ..then keep it filled during the day as you enjoy the views. :oI would agree that you will enjoy it much more up on the open deck !!! So much more to see and the body warmth of those around you may help...lol. We found as the day progressed and sun warmed us, we enventually were able to sit without our jackets but a hoodie on .

Wear warm shoes like a good quality runner or hiking shoe..no need for boots !!! You can walk around the deck to warm up your feet and body.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for the info. I will not be bringing my blanket for sure. The beginning of thread poster said dont bother w gloves, etc. Other posters said they used heavy winter coats. I guess I will just have to bring everything LOL. I just hate dressing in layers. Hate that bulky feeling of shirt, light jacket, heavy jacket, etc...seems so much, i will feel like im all taped up and cant walk like a robot lol. Thanks for all the suggestions :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our Alaskan cruise was in mid-August so probably a lot warmer than in May, but maybe not that much more. I agree about the layers as it depends on what you're doing in port and also what the weather actually is on your cruise. Don't forget that Ketchikan is one of the rainiest places on earth too.

 

We actually arrived in Seattle during a rare heat spell there, but a few days later while on the cruise it got a bit cooler -- the 60s during the day and some rain. It also will be lighter later, but that might not be that much a factor in May.

 

I would agree about going out on an open deck, but then we had an inside. You might get a wider view of the beauty from both sides of the deck too.

 

Here's a view of the Tracy Arm Strait behind our little one (about ten years ago). Note her footwear:

2314382750103777938xEncMY_fs_zps808bf085.jpg

 

I probably overdid the packing, packing a lot of woolies that we never did wear, especially as Princess has self-service laundries. In fact, when we were about to board the train to go up the west coast, the Amtrak clerk said my suitcase was over the weight maximum. My hubby insisted he actually weigh it (rather than just guess the weight by picking it up) and it was a half pound under the max. Whew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SaidieN and Hugs...i am on the NCL Jewel. So, your saying a long sleeve shirt, a light jacket of some sort and then a winter coat over that? Plus hat and gloves? I guess I need to do this for the dogsled thing at least anyway, right? Going thru the glaciers I will do what you said, go to open area or windows. The Jewel has a lounge on top deck w windows all around. Maybe I will go there and bring my coat and step in and out of the lounge, if I can. I think your ideas are better and I should follow them LOL....Thanks all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Our Alaskan cruise was in mid-August so probably a lot warmer than in May' date=' but maybe not that much more. I agree about the layers as it depends on what you're doing in port and also what the weather actually is on your cruise. Don't forget that Ketchikan is one of the rainiest places on earth too.

 

We actually arrived in Seattle during a rare heat spell there, but a few days later while on the cruise it got a bit cooler -- the 60s during the day and some rain. It also will be lighter later, but that might not be that much a factor in May.

 

I would agree about going out on an open deck, but then we had an inside. You might get a wider view of the beauty from both sides of the deck too.

 

Here's a view of the Tracy Arm Strait behind our little one (about ten years ago). Note her footwear:

2314382750103777938xEncMY_fs_zps808bf085.jpg

 

I probably overdid the packing, packing a lot of woolies that we never did wear, especially as Princess has self-service laundries. In fact, when we were about to board the train to go up the west coast, the Amtrak clerk said my suitcase was over the weight maximum. My hubby insisted he actually weigh it (rather than just guess the weight by picking it up) and it was a half pound under the max. Whew.

OMG, I would never have noticed the footwear unless you told me LOL. Im just going to over pack as usual. I was really trying to under pack for a change but I guess this is not the cruise to start now lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of these have been mentioned but this would be (and has been) my clothing for cruises/ trips including helicopter flights and walking on glaciers. You'll usually have an idea of the forecast for the day of your excursion. (They did give us boots and had coats for those who needed something warmer so check with your excursion company re: those) You're in the NE so probably have most of these.

gloves (not thick or bulky, just something to keep fingers from being chilled) - these were in my pockets even when just on deck in case needed

wide headband (easier to pack than earmuffs and more versatile)

thin but warm socks

jeans (one year had the silk undies beneath but didn't really need)

camisole

long-sleeved tee (sometimes with an open shirt over that)

hooded zipped rain jacket lined with sweat-shirt fabric (now could probably find with thinner lining) (I also like to buy vests as souvenirs so Alaska was good place for doing that but sometimes pack one, too.)

laced walking shoes but not heavy boots

scarf that could be used around head /face/ or neck if needed

SUNGLASSES

Binoculars

Chapstick

 

Enjoy your trip to Alaska. Can't wait to go again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • 2019 Cruisers' Choice Awards
      • NCL Sail-Away Giveaway Sweepstakes - Win a 7-Day Cruise on Norwegian Joy!
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Community Contests
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×