Jump to content

Travel phrases for a Baltic cruise?


Recommended Posts

I am sure that English would be sufficient for most cruise ports, but we like to learn a few phrases of a local language, to help with travel as well as to try to be good global citizens. Do the cruise lines have a few phrases in the daily newsletter or offer quick workshops with phrases? We are going with Royal Caribbean.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are websites that you can learn some phrases complete with pronouncation ...google is your friend

 

Most European ports English is widely spoken unless you are off the beaten path

Link to post
Share on other sites
I am sure that English would be sufficient for most cruise ports, but we like to learn a few phrases of a local language, to help with travel as well as to try to be good global citizens. Do the cruise lines have a few phrases in the daily newsletter or offer quick workshops with phrases? We are going with Royal Caribbean.

Not so sure if local phrases will make a different - but very different in Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian and Russian languages.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Not so sure if local phrases will make a different - but very different in Danish, Swedish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian and Russian languages.

 

Well Swedish, Norwegian and Danish aren't really that different if you ask me at least not when it comes to more

common phrases or basic numbers although Danes count "backwards" for higher numbers in the same way as they do in Germany. ;)

 

Like Hej, god morgon, god afton/aften, tack/takk, Ja, nej and etc.

 

But it also depends on what accent the speaker have. Danish spoken in southern/western Denmark is imo quite different then the Danish spoken in i.e. Copenhagen area.

Norwegian is more of a mix of Danish and Swedish.

 

Finnish and Estonian are closely related but I don't know how different/similar they are to each other.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Holland I think these days the young people of those countries speak much better English than many Brits and North Americans.

 

We had no language barrier in any of the Baltic ports.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well Swedish, Norwegian and Danish aren't really that different if you ask me at least not when it comes to more

common phrases or basic numbers although Danes count "backwards" for higher numbers in the same way as they do in Germany. ;)

 

Like Hej, god morgon, god afton/aften, tack/takk, Ja, nej and etc.

 

But it also depends on what accent the speaker have. Danish spoken in southern/western Denmark is imo quite different then the Danish spoken in i.e. Copenhagen area.

Norwegian is more of a mix of Danish and Swedish.

 

Finnish and Estonian are closely related but I don't know how different/similar they are to each other.

 

I would say that Finnish and Estonian are a little further away from each other than Swedish, Danish and Norwegian are from each other. As a native Finnish speaker having studied the mandatory Swedish courses at school I would say that I understand written Danish nearly as well as written Estonian. Which is not saying much as I can only grasp the meaning of simple sentences in context.

 

Grammar and many words in Finnish and Estonian are somewhat similar, but there are also many words that are similar but have clearly the same origin but somewhat different meanings. For example linn in Estonian is a city and linna in Finnish a castle. In general Finnish words tend to end in vowels and the Estonian ones in consonants, which makes understanding spoken language somewhat harder compared to understanding written text.

 

You really do not need to practice travel phrases as pretty much everyone is able to speak English.

Edited by Jonza
Link to post
Share on other sites
I am sure that English would be sufficient for most cruise ports, but we like to learn a few phrases of a local language, to help with travel as well as to try to be good global citizens. Do the cruise lines have a few phrases in the daily newsletter or offer quick workshops with phrases? We are going with Royal Caribbean.

Just to confuse, not all Finns speak Finnish - particularly if you visit Aland. I met an Aland girl who spoke Swedish as a first language, English as a very fluent second language, and Finnish barely at all.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just to confuse, not all Finns speak Finnish - particularly if you visit Aland. I met an Aland girl who spoke Swedish as a first language, English as a very fluent second language, and Finnish barely at all.

 

Åland is a special case since Swedish is the only official language of Åland.

Link to post
Share on other sites
You really do not need to practice travel phrases as pretty much everyone is able to speak English.
Agreed.

 

The most important travel phrases in this part of the world are, I think, "Good morning/afternoon/evening", "Please [may I]", and "Thank you". My experience of cruise passengers is that many of them seem to have failed to practise using these.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Thank You for 25 Years - Click for Fun Stuff!
      • Forum Assistance
      • ANNOUNCEMENT: Crystal Cruises - New! Luxury Bahamas Escapes
      • ICYM Our Cruise Critic Live Special Event: Explore the Remote World with Hurtigruten!
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...