Jump to content

Camera gear for Antarctica


Recommended Posts

My wife has a Panasonic Lumix point and shoot that has a 20x zoom. She wanted something with more reach, so we just got her a Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS40 with a 30x zoom. We looked at bridge cameras, but she wanted something that would fit in a pocket or purse.

 

Woody

 

I am curious as to how your wife liked the Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS40 and how well it performed under adverse :rolleyes: conditions.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I am curious as to how your wife liked the Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS40 and how well it performed under adverse :rolleyes: conditions.

Steve: although my wife has yet to use the DMC-ZS40 under adverse conditions (we have upcoming trips to Kenya for the Great Migration, Antarctica, Fairbanks for the Northern Lights, and the Galapagos), she likes the camera and would recommend it.

 

She especially likes:

  • The spot focus feature lets her focus on a small subject, such as a bird in a tree.
  • The 30x zoom range is nice, and will come in handy when photographing wildlife.
  • The horizontal level is very handy.
  • She likes having the viewfinder, especially in bright sunlight.

Some dislikes:

  • There is a longer lag time between exposures than on her prior camera.
  • The camera does not have the traditional rule of thirds grid. (It has several others.)
  • This camera uses batteries faster than her prior camera.

Overall, she likes the camera and would recommend it.

 

Woody

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

. . . I usually take 100-200 pictures/day. Should I plan on more than two batteries/day?

You should be fine, though it depends on your shooting habits and subjects. (Video? Reviewing photos and/or showing others? Editing and deleting photos? Long shooting sessions, such as animal watching?)

 

Woody

Link to post
Share on other sites
You should be fine, though it depends on your shooting habits and subjects. (Video? Reviewing photos and/or showing others? Editing and deleting photos? Long shooting sessions, such as animal watching?)

 

Woody

 

Thank you for your response. I rarely take videos, review is usually done after downloading unless it was some kind of unusual circumstance, editing and deleting photos is done after downloading to my netbook and finally, I don't do extensive animal watching. That being the case, I conclude that I should be okay.

 

Considering your wife's comment about a lack of a configuration guide for a rule of thirds grid, either of the crossed lines configuration guides provide the rule of thirds grid within them. The crossed lines may be a confusion factor, but it should be possible to overcome that with practice.

Edited by lone_stranger
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the response Woody. How fast does it go through batteries? I am planning on one spare, so I will have two batteries/day. I usually take 100-200 pictures/day. Should I plan on more than two batteries/day?

 

Batteries are cheap to buy. Also think about how difficult it will be in the places you will touring in to get a new battery if one is lost or fails. My rule when I am traveling to out-of-the-way places is to assume that something (whatever that something is) will fail and I need backups or alternatives of everything.

 

DON

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the response Woody. How fast does it go through batteries? I am planning on one spare, so I will have two batteries/day. I usually take 100-200 pictures/day. Should I plan on more than two batteries/day?

 

This might help with saving battery power.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54201219

 

Tom :cool:

 

I use this site DPREVIEW.COM Panasonic forum to learn about my cameras.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
Two questions: what brand/model bag did you end up buying? I've been trying to figure out what would work for me, as well. what date are you cruising? I'm going December 8.

 

We purchased a Seattle Sports waterproof bag, Reign Backpack, from REI. Its a 34L bag and it will fit a 10x40 binocular, a DSLR with 300mm zoom lens and still have room for other items (spare gloves, etc). We also picked up a smaller 10L waterproof bag - not sure if we'll use it. The Seattle bag has the typical "three roll" top closure. The main compartment is waterproof and it has an external pocket with a "splashproof" zipper.

 

We wanted a single bag that would safely carry our larger items to shore. The Seattle bag could also be used to temporarily store excess clothes if we're too warm after landing.

 

Our Quark trip is in early January 2015.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Those of you who've gone, did any of you carry two bodies onto land at once?

 

Like Woody, I am bringing two bodies and was planning to bring them both with me on landings to keep me from having to change lenses outside. So maybe one with a wide-angle lens and one with a long one. I am having trouble figuring out, though, if that's just going to be too much hassle.

 

I'm not sure yet how I'm going to carry them...I'm thinking some sort of dry bag with backpack straps.

 

My plan so far is to bring four batteries for the DSLRs, so each body has one battery + one spare in case the cold kills the first one too quickly.

 

But I'd love to hear from you if you carried two bodies (and how) or if you tried it and found it to be too much of a pain.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Those of you who've gone, did any of you carry two bodies onto land at once?

 

Like Woody, I am bringing two bodies and was planning to bring them both with me on landings to keep me from having to change lenses outside. So maybe one with a wide-angle lens and one with a long one. I am having trouble figuring out, though, if that's just going to be too much hassle.

 

I'm not sure yet how I'm going to carry them...I'm thinking some sort of dry bag with backpack straps.

 

My plan so far is to bring four batteries for the DSLRs, so each body has one battery + one spare in case the cold kills the first one too quickly.

 

But I'd love to hear from you if you carried two bodies (and how) or if you tried it and found it to be too much of a pain.

 

 

Never had a issue with the batteries. In fact never had to change a battery while on land.

 

Did have a body die on land. Fortunately it was the autofocus and managed to limp thru until I could get my backup body.

 

I used a dry bag to protect the camera gear. It was placed in a normal backpack. Neither ever got wet. Remember the issue on a wet landing is getting in and out of the zodiac -- so was always best to minimize anything in hands, arms or shoulders -- a backpack was ideal.

Edited by PaulMCO
Link to post
Share on other sites

My current plan is to bring two DSLR bodies with me but only one on landings. The Canon T4i will be my backup body and used only when necessary.

 

The other Canon is a full frame body and will have a 70-300 zoom. I'll bring my 24-104 zoom on this trip, as well - but maybe not on landings. We will have a Olympus TG-830 for use in a zodiac and general landscapes.

 

Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites
Never had a issue with the batteries. In fact never had to change a battery while on land.

 

Did have a body die on land. Fortunately it was the autofocus and managed to limp thru until I could get my backup body.

 

I used a dry bag to protect the camera gear. It was placed in a normal backpack. Neither ever got wet. Remember the issue on a wet landing is getting in and out of the zodiac -- so was always best to minimize anything in hands, arms or shoulders -- a backpack was ideal.

 

Thanks for the feedback. What caused your body to die? Was it weather-related?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the feedback. What caused your body to die? Was it weather-related?

 

 

It was a one month old Nikon D610.... Nothing weather related. Just and connector issues within the camera -- likely poor assembly/quality.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

 

what brand/model bag did you end up buying?

Before our expedition, I bought the Outdoor Research "Dry Peak Bagger." It worked exceptionally well, and I was very pleased.

 

During our expedition, we not only dealt with wet landings, but while riding on the zodiac, we encountered snowfall, sleet, rain, heavy salt spray, and splash from waves. When seated on the zodiac, our backpacks were often exposed, as they were facing outward. Backpacks place on the floor of the zodiacs often got wet with water sloshing around the floor. There were people whose standard canvas backpacks got completely soaked through.

 

After the first zodiac rides, many people bought a dry bag at the onboard shop.

 

YMMV

 

Woody

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Those of you who've gone, did any of you carry two bodies onto land at once?

 

Like Woody, I am bringing two bodies and was planning to bring them both with me on landings to keep me from having to change lenses outside. So maybe one with a wide-angle lens and one with a long one. I am having trouble figuring out, though, if that's just going to be too much hassle.

 

I'm not sure yet how I'm going to carry them...I'm thinking some sort of dry bag with backpack straps.

 

While on the NatGeo Explorer, I took two D7100 bodies fitted with 18-300mm and 80-400mm lenses on landings. The 18-300 was my "go to" lens (thanks Turtles for the advice!). The 80-400 lens was fantastic for isolating animals and for animal headshots.

 

I used the Outdoor Research "Dry Peak Bagger" mentioned in my above post. It is a dry bag with backpack straps. Just make sure you add some padding, such as a towel or bubble wrap, between your gear. The bag also has a convenient "ice axe sleeve" (an external sleeve) which was perfect for holding my monopod.

 

 

My plan so far is to bring four batteries for the DSLRs, so each body has one battery + one spare in case the cold kills the first one too quickly.

 

I too had four batteries for the two DSLRs. The Nikon batteries held up extremely well in the cold. I kept the spare batteries warm in an inner jacket pocket, and only had to change a DSLR battery once or twice while off the ship. I never had to use the "fourth" battery, which was comforting.

 

However, due to the conditions at one especially chilly, snowy, and windy landing, I didn't dare bringing out the DSLR. Instead, I tried using my Olympus waterproof point and shoot. Fully charged batteries only lasted a couple of minutes. Then I tried using my Canon S100 point and shoot, with similar results. But even though I had a RainSleeve for my DSLR, I wasn't about to bring it out in those conditions.

 

Woody

Link to post
Share on other sites
Those of you who've gone, did any of you carry two bodies onto land at once?

 

Like Woody, I am bringing two bodies and was planning to bring them both with me on landings to keep me from having to change lenses outside. So maybe one with a wide-angle lens and one with a long one. I am having trouble figuring out, though, if that's just going to be too much hassle.

 

I'm not sure yet how I'm going to carry them...I'm thinking some sort of dry bag with backpack straps.

 

My plan so far is to bring four batteries for the DSLRs, so each body has one battery + one spare in case the cold kills the first one too quickly.

 

But I'd love to hear from you if you carried two bodies (and how) or if you tried it and found it to be too much of a pain.

 

I brought two bodies on the expedition, but only carried one on the landings with me (my D7000). I also had a compact waterproof camera with me on the landings (Nikon AW100), and my spouse had a small video camera. (My second DSLR body was for backup on the trip itself.)

 

I had read about cold killing the batteries, and so I had four batteries with me on the trip, three of which I took on the landings. But those Nikon batteries are so great that I never experienced premature discharge due to the cold.

 

While on the NatGeo Explorer, I took two D7100 bodies fitted with 18-300mm and 80-400mm lenses on landings. The 18-300 was my "go to" lens (thanks Turtles for the advice!). The 80-400 lens was fantastic for isolating animals and for animal headshots.

 

I used the Outdoor Research "Dry Peak Bagger" mentioned in my above post. It is a dry bag with backpack straps. Just make sure you add some padding, such as a towel or bubble wrap, between your gear. The bag also has a convenient "ice axe sleeve" (an external sleeve) which was perfect for holding my monopod.

 

. . .

However, due to the conditions at one especially chilly, snowy, and windy landing, I didn't dare bringing out the DSLR. Instead, I tried using my Olympus waterproof point and shoot. Fully charged batteries only lasted a couple of minutes. Then I tried using my Canon S100 point and shoot, with similar results. But even though I had a RainSleeve for my DSLR, I wasn't about to bring it out in those conditions.

 

Woody

 

Woody, thanks and I'm so glad the 18-300mm worked out for you.

 

Boulder Girl: my experiences were similar to Woody's. You need to have your good gear in a dry bag in the zodiac even when it's not precipitating, until you are sure you aren't going to get a lot of spray, etc. You'll quickly get the hang of when it's "safe" to take out your good camera. (And I really think it's important to have a pocket size waterproof camera along.)

 

I had the Dry Peak Bagger as well, although we later found some smaller and equally good dry bags from REI (the brand name escapes me), and I think I primarily used those in the zodiacs. But the key is having a dry bag!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • Q&A with the Quark Expeditions Team: New Ship Ultramarine
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...