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Travel Documentation


Raxter54
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Getting a little confused on what travel documentation is required on my cruise to the Western Caribbean (Falmouth, Georgetown, Cozumel). especially what we need to board the Serenade in NOLA.

 

We are applying for a Passport card, which the State Department website says is good for sea travel to Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean (and is $80 cheaper). When we have these, are we still required to have a government issued photo ID (driver's license) and proof of citizenship (birth certificate)? Just want to make sure we don't get turned away at the dock...

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Getting a little confused on what travel documentation is required on my cruise to the Western Caribbean (Falmouth, Georgetown, Cozumel). especially what we need to board the Serenade in NOLA.

 

We are applying for a Passport card, which the State Department website says is good for sea travel to Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean (and is $80 cheaper). When we have these, are we still required to have a government issued photo ID (driver's license) and proof of citizenship (birth certificate)? Just want to make sure we don't get turned away at the dock...

 

For embarkation, the passport card will be sufficient. However, many ports require a photo ID as well as the S&S card when entering or leaving the port area. Generally, the daily will remind you if ID is required ashore.

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You don't even need the passport card or passport, just your driver's license and certified birth certificate (if you are an American citizen) is all that is needed for a closed loop cruise. (Starts and ends in the same U.S. port).

 

Some countries do require your sail card and a photo I.D. to allow you to return to the ship (Nassau comes to mind). Otherwise just your sail card will get you on the ship. Leave the passport cards/passport in the room safe.

Edited by Sauer-kraut
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For embarkation, the passport card will be sufficient. However, many ports require a photo ID as well as the S&S card when entering or leaving the port area. Generally, the daily will remind you if ID is required ashore.

 

The passport card serves as that photo ID where required, so the OP will not need an additional photo ID.

Edited by njhorseman
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For embarkation, the passport card will be sufficient. However, many ports require a photo ID as well as the S&S card when entering or leaving the port area. Generally, the daily will remind you if ID is required ashore.

 

The passport card has your picture.

 

I have both a passport and the passport card. I can use the passport card as an ID to carry with me and on Caribbean cruises and when we go to Tijuana. It is better than a passport when coming back from Tijuana. No standing in line for an hour like the passport people do.

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There is no excuse for not having a US Passport for leaving the country on a cruise. Sorry folks, as I have posted before, if you can afford to cruise, you can afford a US Passport. As others have posted, in the unlikely event that your closed loop cruise gets busted, you are in line for a long time to prove who you are in whatever country you are stuck in, including a medical evacuation. Get one in a timely manner.

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Getting a little confused on what travel documentation is required on my cruise to the Western Caribbean (Falmouth, Georgetown, Cozumel). especially what we need to board the Serenade in NOLA.

 

We are applying for a Passport card, which the State Department website says is good for sea travel to Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean (and is $80 cheaper). When we have these, are we still required to have a government issued photo ID (driver's license) and proof of citizenship (birth certificate)? Just want to make sure we don't get turned away at the dock...

 

Not sure why you're paying money to get a passport card when all you need for your closed loop cruise is official birth certificate and photo id. If you're going to pay for something you should pay the extra and get the regular passport since it is also good for air travel, all over the world.

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A passport card is useless for your purpose. A birth certificate and government issued ID card is sufficient. If you get stuck in a foreign country you can not fly to the US on a passport card. Get the book.

 

Actually having a passport card should make it a bit easier to obtain a passport if one is needed in an emergency. You've already gone through the same application process as is used to obtain a passport, and the State Department has vetted that application and approved you. You're already "in the system" at that point.

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There is no excuse for not having a US Passport for leaving the country on a cruise. Sorry folks, as I have posted before, if you can afford to cruise, you can afford a US Passport. As others have posted, in the unlikely event that your closed loop cruise gets busted, you are in line for a long time to prove who you are in whatever country you are stuck in, including a medical evacuation. Get one in a timely manner.

 

Just posting something before doesn't make it fact. It's your opinion.

 

If you've price a short weekend cruise you'll see that the cost of a passport can be darn close to the cost of the cruise and for some people that may tip the scales toward making the trip outside their budget.

 

There's a very minuscule risk in not having a passport and many people are willing to accept that risk because it's so small.

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Quote from Njhorseman: If you've price a short weekend cruise you'll see that the cost of a passport can be darn close to the cost of the cruise and for some people that may tip the scales toward making the trip outside their budget :end of quote:.

 

There's a very minuscule risk in not having a passport and many people are willing to accept that risk because it's so small.

Except when you are on a closed loop cruise that you get medicacuated off the ship. That is a game changer. Getting a passport is not a great hassle. Most can and should but some do not based on the low information they get that they will always get back where they started. It is not a cake walk to get back from a broken loop cruise and you have much to do to just get out of country, have heard this from a couple of close friends that had it happen in the last 3 years. As I said before, There is not an excuse not to have a US Passport when traveling outside of the US. End of line......

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A passport card is useless for your purpose. A birth certificate and government issued ID card is sufficient. If you get stuck in a foreign country you can not fly to the US on a passport card. Get the book.

 

It is not useless. Using a birth certificate and DL is useless as a government ID. The US government will recognize the passport card over someone showing up with a BC and DL where both can be forged.

 

Just because you don't have a passport card does not make them useless.

 

I notice you don't anywhere where you need a passport.

 

Explain how you know that a passport card is useless? If you travel by car to either Mexico or Canada it is ideal. Since you never do that you would not know.

 

I understand that from pointy of limited view it seems useless.

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There is no excuse for not having a US Passport for leaving the country on a cruise. Sorry folks, as I have posted before, if you can afford to cruise, you can afford a US Passport.

 

Well, excuse this poor peasant for wanting to give his wife of 40 years an anniversary gift of a cruise. Not all of can throw hundreds of dollars around like Monopoly money. Please pardon this unworthy person for intruding in your elite world....

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Quote from Njhorseman: If you've price a short weekend cruise you'll see that the cost of a passport can be darn close to the cost of the cruise and for some people that may tip the scales toward making the trip outside their budget :end of quote:.

 

There's a very minuscule risk in not having a passport and many people are willing to accept that risk because it's so small.

Except when you are on a closed loop cruise that you get medicacuated off the ship. That is a game changer. Getting a passport is not a great hassle. Most can and should but some do not based on the low information they get that they will always get back where they started. It is not a cake walk to get back from a broken loop cruise and you have much to do to just get out of country, have heard this from a couple of close friends that had it happen in the last 3 years. As I said before, There is not an excuse not to have a US Passport when traveling outside of the US. End of line......

 

Um, since not having a passport is a legitimate and legal choice no excuse is necessary- not everyone's travel needs are the same. There will be hassle and delay in returning "if" something happens and every passenger needs to analyze how likely that "if" is for themselves. How much hassle and delay will be dependent upon the facts and circumstances (it would take longer for someone who overstayed at Senor Frogs than it would for someone who had a medical emergency).

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A passport card is useless for your purpose. A birth certificate and government issued ID card is sufficient. If you get stuck in a foreign country you can not fly to the US on a passport card. Get the book.

 

umm no it is NOT useless at all. in fact it's probably the most cost effective option for people who intend to do a lot of cruising to the same areas but is NOT intending to do much other foreign travel.

 

one Passport card: ONE item to keep track of. and if you have it, it does make getting back by air slightly less painful in the unlikely event it becomes necessary. the information is already on file.

 

it doubles as your picture ID for those ports that require it, smaller to keep than a passport, so less unwieldy.

 

The only reason we don't have a PPcard is we do do a lot of other foreign travel so our regular PP is in frequent use.

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A passport card is useless for your purpose. A birth certificate and government issued ID card is sufficient. If you get stuck in a foreign country you can not fly to the US on a passport card. Get the book.

 

It's not useless if someone has to bring a naturalization certificate. Since it costs several hundred dollars to replace one of those even if damaged (like, by spilling water on it) spending $40 or so makes sense even if one only uses it for cruising (and of course it gets more value if one lives near the border). I almost bought passport cards for DW and I because of this but opted for Enhanced Drivers Licenses instead (that way we only have one thing to carry and it's something that we carry virtually all of the time anyway) (and of course it helps that we live in a state that issues EDL's:)).

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The wife and I have decided to go for the passport book. We've juggled the cruise budget to allow for this. Another thing that allows for this is that Bluecross/Blueshield covers the cost of our Hepatitis A/B and Typhoid immunizations. Sweet :D

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Getting a little confused on what travel documentation is required on my cruise to the Western Caribbean (Falmouth, Georgetown, Cozumel). especially what we need to board the Serenade in NOLA.

 

We are applying for a Passport card, which the State Department website says is good for sea travel to Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean (and is $80 cheaper). When we have these, are we still required to have a government issued photo ID (driver's license) and proof of citizenship (birth certificate)? Just want to make sure we don't get turned away at the dock...

 

 

Fine. But please remember for the future that some cruise lines (I.e., most premium and luxury lines) require that ALL passengers on ALL itineraries have a passport book. What government officials require is only one part of the equation.

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

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You can all have your cards, birth certificates and other stuff, me I will never leave the USA without a US Passport at any time. Yes, I can pay for it and the renewal fees and never have an issue. The rest of the folks go take your chances.

 

I will, thank you.

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As a Canadian, we travel with our passport all of the time. Once through customs, we put it in our safe on the ship and carry a photocopy of the information pages when off the ship. The only time this was a problem was Dubrovnik where we had to show the original and Key West, the Navy personnel really weren't pleased with us when we were docked at the Navy Pier. Luckily I had my DL and credit card with my pic!

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