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Why not use diesel to run the engines directly?


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Just got off the Celebrity Millennium a few days ago. Was claimed by the ship officers that the ship was quiet due to being powered by 2 gas turbines (claimed to be the marine equivalent of a 757 engine, so either a R-R or less likely, P&W engines). The other was a 16 cylinder Wartsilla diesel. All I heard for most of the cruise (a TPAC) was the rather-distinct thump of a large diesel, and this was in the top deck.

 

The diesels are usually down in the bowels of the ship because of the weight .

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  • 2 months later...
That's why you'll see airliners only use one engine to taxi now, and start the second engine just before turning onto the runway.

 

http://newatlas.com/go/3263/

 

I'm a retired pilot (B-757, B-767, B-727) and there's no way in hell I would roll onto the active for takeoff with one of my engines running for less than a minute. That is a recipe for a disaster, losing one on takeoff. We start up both engines right after pushback, dump the APU, and the pilot not taxiing keeps a close eye on the engine instruments to detect anything strange. Yes, after landing, we will occasionally shutdown one engine to save fuel.

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I'm a retired pilot (B-757, B-767, B-727) and there's no way in hell I would roll onto the active for takeoff with one of my engines running for less than a minute. That is a recipe for a disaster, losing one on takeoff. We start up both engines right after pushback, dump the APU, and the pilot not taxiing keeps a close eye on the engine instruments to detect anything strange. Yes, after landing, we will occasionally shutdown one engine to save fuel.

 

Maybe at your airline.

 

But several airlines taxi on one, and start the other close to takeoff. Not one minute, but not more than maybe 5.

 

I am former AF, and alert birds can be in the air within 5 minutes of the call out. In the old days, I remember SAC aircraft were running down the runway within a minute or two of crew boarding.

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Maybe at your airline.

 

But several airlines taxi on one, and start the other close to takeoff. Not one minute, but not more than maybe 5.

 

I am former AF, and alert birds can be in the air within 5 minutes of the call out. In the old days, I remember SAC aircraft were running down the runway within a minute or two of crew boarding.

 

That single-engine taxi policy started with my carrier when the price of Jet-A went through the roof. Some carriers were also saving money by allowing reverse-thrust pushback from the gate. No tugs needed. That also stopped when the prices increased. Maintenance was not happy about full thrust TO's with a partially warmed engine. So, when the fuel cost dropped, the brass cancelled the single engine taxi policy. 5 minutes is a sufficient time for application of TO power, but unless there were very long delays getting to the business end of the active, we usually started both after tug release.

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Like I said, different policies for different airlines.

 

I fly a lot for business, and a number of carriers, they obviously start another one on the taxi out. Yes, if there are no delays, they might start after push back.

 

AFAIK, power backs were only used on aircraft with tail mounted engines.

 

I just ride on a lot of airlines. I never wanted to be a bus driver. :D

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Like I said, different policies for different airlines.

 

I fly a lot for business, and a number of carriers, they obviously start another one on the taxi out. Yes, if there are no delays, they might start after push back.

 

AFAIK, power backs were only used on aircraft with tail mounted engines.

 

I just ride on a lot of airlines. I never wanted to be a bus driver. :D

 

Yes, we did reverse thrust push-backs only with the "3 holer" (B-727). The wing mounted engines would throw too much crud at the terminal due to their low mounting. Some airports squashed it in the notams for certain gates or terminals due to large glass windows. And I considered my 81,000 hours flying my passengers with zero incidents as much more than a "bus driver" and I'm damn proud of it. Some guys I flew with felt that way, and their attitude on the flight deck was definitely depressing. I bid different routes when I knew my FO had a "bus driver" attitude. But many times I had no choice. .

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I did not mean bus driver as demeaning, but as a job satisfaction issue. Like an F1 driver switching to driving a Greyhound.

 

And too many hours on United, listing to the cockpit radios with HOURS of nothing but "is there a smoother altitude" calls. :)

 

81,000 hours? Wow, at an FAA max of 1,000 hours per year, you flew for 81 years. Not bad with a mandatory retirement at 65. :D

 

I have about 1,800 hours. But less than 1 hour total time on autopilot. All the rest hand flown. From a Super Cub to jets.

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I did not mean bus driver as demeaning, but as a job satisfaction issue. Like an F1 driver switching to driving a Greyhound.

 

And too many hours on United, listing to the cockpit radios with HOURS of nothing but "is there a smoother altitude" calls. :)

 

81,000 hours? Wow, at an FAA max of 1,000 hours per year, you flew for 81 years. Not bad with a mandatory retirement at 65. :D

 

I have about 1,800 hours. But less than 1 hour total time on autopilot. All the rest hand flown. From a Super Cub to jets.

 

The FAA max is probably closer to 4000 miles per year . A 1000 hours is about 90 hours a month. Probably should be 90 hours every two weeks.

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I did not mean bus driver as demeaning, but as a job satisfaction issue. Like an F1 driver switching to driving a Greyhound.

 

And too many hours on United, listing to the cockpit radios with HOURS of nothing but "is there a smoother altitude" calls. :)

 

81,000 hours? Wow, at an FAA max of 1,000 hours per year, you flew for 81 years. Not bad with a mandatory retirement at 65. :D

 

I have about 1,800 hours. But less than 1 hour total time on autopilot. All the rest hand flown. From a Super Cub to jets.

I was speaking of DUTY HOURS, not flight hours. In my 31 years of airline flight, I averaged about 35 hours per week But before my airline career started, I flew privately starting at age 19, then commercially, towing banners along the FL beaches. Then thousands of hours of private and instrument instructor time, and business flying. I retired at 60, and I'm still flying today, an Aerostar 601P.

And I'm done with this thread, because there always seems to be a snarky comment. Let's let this thread get back to the OP's topic of ships, engines and fuel.

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I was speaking of DUTY HOURS, not flight hours. In my 31 years of airline flight, I averaged about 35 hours per week But before my airline career started, I flew privately starting at age 19, then commercially, towing banners along the FL beaches. Then thousands of hours of private and instrument instructor time, and business flying. I retired at 60, and I'm still flying today, an Aerostar 601P.

And I'm done with this thread, because there always seems to be a snarky comment. Let's let this thread get back to the OP's topic of ships, engines and fuel.

 

Not trying to be snarky. Just wondering, as I have many active and retired airline friends. Never had one count duty hours. And they are mostly somewhere in the 20K hours.

 

I just knew that airline flying was not for ME. As I said, may friends who did it, and loved it. Including one, who has probably the most PIC 747 time ever. He started as PIC on 747 about age 30 and flew it as Captain for 30 years.

 

I am jealous, Aerostar is a sweet airplane.

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The FAA max is probably closer to 4000 miles per year . A 1000 hours is about 90 hours a month. Probably should be 90 hours every two weeks.

 

4000 miles? WHAT are you talking about?

 

FAA limits airline pilots to a maximum of 1000 flying hours per year. Look it up. PArt 121 regulations.

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