Jump to content
Jane2357

How old is too old?

Recommended Posts

I've offered to take my father along on our April '17 Panama Canal Cruise. Dad is 80 and in excellent condition, very active, mentally sharp. I think he thinks HIS ship has sailed and won't go. He said it would make him uneasy being away from health care in an emergency. :confused::(

 

At what age do you seasoned cruisers think that you may be too old? I'm thinking some of you die hards would say that to die while cruising wouldn't be all that bad ;) but seriously do any of you have an anxious thoughts about good medical care in other parts of the world even covering yourself with the proper insurance? Would you ever think you were too old to cruise?

Edited by Jane2357

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I need the presence of a couple of carers at my side 24/7 might be the time to call a halt....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My FIL won Carnival's Hairy Chest contest at 80.

 

Age is primarily a mental thing. Ive known several 30yos that are 'older' than my FIL.

Physical ability is a whole 'nother matter.

 

If he's feeling uneasy then it's time.

Edited by SadieN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the age of 81, my mother moved from the home of nearly 50 years to a senior community. She had her own two bedroom apt. Yeah, my father would never have considered moving there, he said he would not live where there was only old people. but he had been gone five years. Well, those old people turned out to be many of the parents of my classmates, people she already knew. And they were always on the go...cruises, trip to Europe...

I was going to attend a professional conference in Puerto Rico and I asked her to go along. Prior to her move, she would have demurred, said she was too old, etc. But with all those people around her traveling at her age and older, she came. We also took my oldest niece, her oldest grandchild along so that she would have company while I was in meetings. She had a great time.

There was a man who used to sail Carnival over his birthday every year. He celebrated his 100th onboard. EM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are in reasonably good health and active, he should not have any worries.

We are late 50's and on some cruises we have felt like the youngest people on board.

Go on and have some fun.

 

If my ship has sailed, I am probably on it. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When I need the presence of a couple of carers at my side 24/7 might be the time to call a halt....

 

Not necessarily. We had a member here who had a progressive neurological disease who sailed yearly to Bermuda, with two caregivers and a Hoyer lift. She had only the use of one hand by the time I met her, had to be fed. She also lived alone with the help of care givers. Sadly, she died three years ago at 67. She was one of 14 people who helped to write the Americans with Disabilities Act. EM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sister and I had the pleasure of having breakfast on our last cruise with a 98 year old man and his significant other, 92. Both were in excellent shape and could probably have run circles around me.

 

As others have said, it is an individual decision and dependent on the person, not their age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I are both closer to 80 than 70 - we cruise every year, at least once (that one being a transAtlantic - after spending a week or so in Italy or England). We have med-evac insurance (hoping to never need it), but expect to continue cruising certainly as long as we are mobile enough to enjoy it - and then as long as such impairment as we might have does not make cruising too difficult or uncomfortable. Given our parents' life spans and general fitness,we reasonably expect to enjoy another dozen-plus years. Ask us again when we are in our 90's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This pass Jan we took a Princess cruise with a friend of ours who was 96 year old priest. We were with him for one week and he did a back to back. The second week on board by him self. I was worried about leaving him on board for the second week alone. But my friend is a priest and while on board the first week we met another priest traveling with his friends. So, they had him moved to their table and kept a eye on him. He was fine. From the ship he went to visit some friends for a few days. Then he took the train from Ft. Lauderdale to Boston to visit more friends. Then he flew home to Canada. This coming Jan he will be 97. He is still in good health.

The important factor is health. He is in great health for his age, in fact for any age!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Age is not as important as health.

 

I have sailed with many people in their 90's who are in great physical shape.

 

Keith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've sailed with loads of people in their 80s, and they were having a great time. There have been a few in their 90s. There's a doctor and nurses onboard, and travel med insurance would need to be purchased since Medicare doesn't cover medical expenses outside the US. Guess it comes down to your father's comfort level.

 

Roz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not necessarily. We had a member here who had a progressive neurological disease who sailed yearly to Bermuda, with two caregivers and a Hoyer lift. She had only the use of one hand by the time I met her, had to be fed. She also lived alone with the help of care givers. Sadly, she died three years ago at 67. She was one of 14 people who helped to write the Americans with Disabilities Act. EM

That's a wonderful story- thank you. I usually meet people with carers on my cruises, and think how wonderful to be able to enjoy life when you have a serious disability. Let's hope we're still sailing away for many more years!- Jo. x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...I think he thinks HIS ship has sailed and won't go. He said it would make him uneasy being away from health care in an emergency.

While I agree with everyone who has posted it is more a matter of one's personal opinion and physical ability than actual age, I would also say that your father has answered that question for you. I would no sooner try to convince him to go than I would someone who is deathly afraid of water/cruising/setting foot on a ship. He is not comfortable with it, leave him be. My own father is 88, he still cruises but he won't go beyond Alaska or a California Coastal for the same reasons your father mentioned about the level of medical care in an emergency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not quite as old as your father, but I think worry is the worst disease we seniors can get! Tell him to relax and enjoy EVERY day and cure that worry disease! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Age is honestly just a number. I work in a hospital with elderly people every day. I can honestly say one 80yo will look great and the next will look 10 years older than their age. Some people don't even make it to 80..

It's about their health. Is he in good health? What about possibly having him go to a doctor for a physical just to say he is in good enough health for a short vacation?

Heck, my grandma is 85, in A-fib and probably shouldn't be traveling and does all the time. She just got back from Europe where she fell off a bus when stepping down to the sidewalk and in a few months plans on going on an Oceania cruise. She pretty much does what she wants to do.

I would say if he's worried about it, you may not be able to force him, but maybe with a doctor's ok? Just get good travel insurance just in case!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps you can print up the responses and show your Dad that many people in their 80's and beyond sail weekly on cruise ships with no problems.

How many of us have seen people far younger in motor scooters onboard having a great time?

I understand his concern to adequate health care and would advise you to look into Medi Vac insurance to quell his fears.

If that doesn't comfort him, let it go.

Everyone's comfort level is different and to pressure someone who is not comfortable is unfair.

I hope he reconsiders and enjoys spending time with you on a cruise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years ago while sailing to Hawaii, we spoke with a Scot's lady at lunch. She was in a wheel chair.

She was by herself, and said that she had been to Hawaii many times but only by 'plane just gassing up, on her way to see relatives in Australia, so, she wanted to see Hawaii by herself.

 

She was 92 years old, and had polio at the age of two, hence the wheel chair!!!

 

At 82 and 86, my wife and I have years of cruising in us.:)

 

john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your only ambition is to live as long as possible, any age is too old. If your ambition is to make the most of the time you have, you're never too old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your Dad doesn't want to go...don't force him! The medical care on a ship is basic...injuries, cuts, bruises, etc....they are not equipped for cardiac issues or operations or anything serious.

 

Personal comfort levels is what you need to consider. While he may be physically fine to cruise, mentally, it might freak him out. Don't force him. Keep him happy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am over 75, and am flying 15 hours a month for Angel Flight. I plan to fly until I cannot pass the medical.

So much varies by the physical and mental condition of the person. There are people young at 80 and some are old at 50.

Last year we we did a 32 day B2B cruise from Buenos Aires to LA. We have done two land trips this year so far and will be on another one shortly.

We are looking at the Pearl Seas cruise of the Great Lakes for next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was 5 I thought 10 was old. When I was 20 I thought 30 was old. When I was 50 I thought 60 was old. And when I was 60 I forgot how to think :). A few years ago we were on a long HAL cruise (over 40 days) and had lunch with a delightful widow who told us she had just turned 89! The lady was a delight (and had over 1000 days with HAL). Later in the cruise we asked her to again join us for lunch and asked if she way flying directly home (which was in Ontario, CA) after the cruise...which ended in Amsterdam. She quickly told us No! And then explained that she was taking the train from Amsterdam to Paris where she had rented an apartment for a month. This 89 year old was traveling alone and we expressed some concern. She further explained that she had a lot of younger friends (mostly in their 70s) in Paris, but still preferred to have her own apartment. When I asked her how she handled all of her luggage she just smiled and said that there were always folks who would "help an old lady" and if that failed she knew how to use her money to get what she wanted.

 

The point is that age is not that important, but health and mobility do matter. I am in my late 60s and routinely take 10 mile fast walks (6 or 7 days a week). When I was 40 I doubt if I could have routinely walked 10 miles at a fast pace....or even a slow pace. When I walk along a pathway near home I often run into "Mike" who is well into his 90s and still walks 5-7 miles a day (just wearing his shorts and sandals. Go figure.

 

Hank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is how he feels and what he wants to do.

 

My dad is 80 and in very good shape and he doesn't travel farther than a few miles from home. Grocery store, bank,random errand. He likes to be in his own home , in his own bed , messing around with his own stuff.

 

He traveled years ago and now he is content at home.

Edited by candycaramel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Age is not as important as health.

 

I have sailed with many people in their 90's who are in great physical shape.

 

Keith

Got to agree. I have a friend who is 4 months younger than I am and he gets around like a snail. I can walk, or run, circles around him. I worked on a house remodel and the carpenter was 72 and his helper was 80. The carpenter nailed up a cabinet soffit and did a chin up on it. I just hope that I can do it when I'm 72.

 

I will quit cruising when I quit breathing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As many people have said, it doesn't matter how many years your father has, if he doesn't want to go, he shouldn't go.

 

As you know, medical service is minimal at best on the ship, and many times, not much better on land at the port of calls. Medical insurance only covers payment of expenses. It does not ensure quality care.

 

Think about this: Suppose you finally convince him to cruise. If he had an medical emergency and the local care wasn't adequate, how would YOU feel if he were to have a lasting impairment due to poor medical care or possibly died? A small fall can lead to a broken hip which leads to . . .

 

If he is actively seeking the cruise, go for it. However, if you are trying to aggressively convince him to go, why not take a lovely vacation with him at a USA land resort instead.

 

Just because you love to cruise and there are many examples of super-seniors (80+) who cruise, it doesn't necessarily follow that your father should cruise. There are many paths to enjoyment.:)

Edited by CruisingAlong4Now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've offered to take my father along on our April '17 Panama Canal Cruise. Dad is 80 and in excellent condition, very active, mentally sharp. I think he thinks HIS ship has sailed and won't go. He said it would make him uneasy being away from health care in an emergency. :confused::(

 

At what age do you seasoned cruisers think that you may be too old? I'm thinking some of you die hards would say that to die while cruising wouldn't be all that bad ;) but seriously do any of you have an anxious thoughts about good medical care in other parts of the world even covering yourself with the proper insurance? Would you ever think you were too old to cruise?

 

I'm not a "seasoned cruiser" but I am a seasoned traveler. :)

 

I will be 75 in October and have travel booked into 2017. I would book it further out, but it's not available yet. :)

 

I have CHF and have had a defibrillator/pacemaker since I was 62. The current (#2) device is a recall, but they tell me the battery is still going.

 

I will keep going as long as the battery does, and then I'll get #3. And yes, if I die while I am traveling, so be it. That is so much better than sitting at home waiting for the time to come.

 

I am a firm believer in always having something to look forward to.

 

He should have good travel medical and evacuation insurance such as MedJet, Medicare won't help, but beyond that he should be enjoying life.

Edited by SPacificbound

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Q&A with Daniel Skjeldam, CEO Hurtigruten
      • Win a 7-Night Romantic Danube Luxury River Cruise with AmaWaterways
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Community Contests
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×