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Some licenses no longer valid for flights, impact to cruising?


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While I personally have never been in this situation, on three separate occasions those I have been traveling with have had to return prematurely. One was due to illness. The other two were medical emergencies involving a loved one at home.

 

Interesting......sorry to hear that. All 3 were u.s. based cruises?

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I'm a little confused. We have passports and always bring them on cruises..... But are you saying that we need to being them ashore on excursions in case we get ill while off the ship? I would never think of carrying my passport around, to get stolen, but I do carry a copy. Would that not be enough?

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I'm a little confused. We have passports and always bring them on cruises..... But are you saying that we need to being them ashore on excursions in case we get ill while off the ship? I would never think of carrying my passport around, to get stolen, but I do carry a copy. Would that not be enough?

 

Most travel experts and the State Department advise not taking your passport ashore from a cruise ship or from a hotel safe. They advise carrying a copy. The reasoning is that it is more likely your passport will be stolen or lost if you carry it from your person, than that you will miss the ship. The copy will facilitate a consulate or embassy getting you a replacement. Like you I never take my passport off the ship except in countries that require it. The only one in 52 cruises was Russia. Some few here will stridently argue that you should take it off the ship. If they want to take that risk, that is their prerogative. I will follow the advise not to carry it off.

 

http://traveltips.usatoday.com/should-carry-passport-times-110089.html

Edited by Charles4515
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I'm a little confused. We have passports and always bring them on cruises..... But are you saying that we need to being them ashore on excursions in case we get ill while off the ship? I would never think of carrying my passport around, to get stolen, but I do carry a copy. Would that not be enough?

 

You should bring your passport ashore. A copy of a passport is worth about as much as a copy of a driver's license is here in the states... which isn't much.

 

When you are cruising, it matters less because about half of the bars in the area of the port accept your sea pass as a form of id, and the other half don't bother to check ids in the first place... But, technically, the only valid form of international ID is the passport. It is accepted ID everywhere, by international law. Drivers licenses and 'lesser' forms of ID are not.

 

Besides, if you missed the boat, and you needed to catch-up in honduras, you'd want your passport in your hands, right? not on the boat?

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Most travel experts and the State Department advise not taking your passport ashore from a cruise ship or from a hotel safe. They advise carrying a copy. The reasoning is that it is more likely your passport will be stolen or lost if you carry it from your person, than that you will miss the ship. The copy will facilitate a consulate or embassy getting you a replacement. Like you I never take my passport off the ship except in countries that require it. The only one in 52 cruises was Russia. Some few here will stridently argue that you should take it off the ship. If they want to take that risk, that is their prerogative. I will follow the advise not to carry it off.

 

http://traveltips.usatoday.com/should-carry-passport-times-110089.html

 

1) You can't equate "cruise ship" to hotel safe. Hotels don't sail away if you aren't back aboard at the right time, for any reason. When you are ashore in a foreign country on a cruise, there is ALWAYS a chance you will need to find alternate means to travel. Leaving your passport will compound an already bad situation and leave you stranded, in a foreign country.

 

2) Most cruisers, most of the time risk very little having their passport on them. Flying into the US with nothing but a driver's license isn't that hard(unless you are in a country that is unfriendly toward the US). this is especially true if you happen to be cruising to a port in the Caribbean... And of course, obviously you don't ever need your passport to board the ship. Just your seapass.

Edited by Diplomacy
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1) You can't equate "cruise ship" to hotel safe. Hotels don't sail away if you aren't back aboard at the right time, for any reason. When you are ashore in a foreign country on a cruise, there is ALWAYS a chance you will need to find alternate means to travel. Leaving your passport will compound an already bad situation and leave you stranded, in a foreign country.

 

2) Most cruisers, most of the time risk very little having their passport on them. Flying into the US with nothing but a driver's license isn't that hard(unless you are in a country that is unfriendly toward the US). this is especially true if you happen to be cruising to a port in the Caribbean... And of course, obviously you don't ever need your passport to board the ship. Just your seapass.

 

I'm confused about this apparent contradiction. Am I missing something? :confused:

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I'm confused about this apparent contradiction. Am I missing something? :confused:

 

If you want to fly home on day 2 of your cruise and camp out at the airport for a week until it's time to fly home while your friends and family sails away... Then no, I guess you technically aren't stranded. If you just want to hire a car to drive you ~100 miles to another port, or purchase a little ticket on a hopper that crosses a boarder to catch up with your ship, then you need a passport.

 

If it were me, I would probably consider an overnight port to port something in line with an "excursion by surprise" while I might consider flying home a huge disappointment. But that's just me.

Edited by Diplomacy
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1) You can't equate "cruise ship" to hotel safe. Hotels don't sail away if you aren't back aboard at the right time, for any reason. When you are ashore in a foreign country on a cruise, there is ALWAYS a chance you will need to find alternate means to travel. Leaving your passport will compound an already bad situation and leave you stranded, in a foreign country.

 

2) Most cruisers, most of the time risk very little having their passport on them. Flying into the US with nothing but a driver's license isn't that hard(unless you are in a country that is unfriendly toward the US). this is especially true if you happen to be cruising to a port in the Caribbean... And of course, obviously you don't ever need your passport to board the ship. Just your seapass.

 

There is very low risk of missing the ship. And it has been reported in other threads in the past that if you leave your passport in the cruise ship safe they will retrieve it if you are not onboard when the ship sails and hand it to the port agent. I have never taken my passport off the ship at port except Russia which requires it to be shown before entering and I never will unless a country requires it. I have also been on a couple of cruises where the cruise line took and held my passport so they had when I was in port. But if it makes you fell better to take it off that is your choice. Hopefully you won't get robbed or pick pocketed. US Passports sell high on the black market so the crooks like to get those.

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If you want to fly home on day 2 of your cruise and camp out at the airport for a week until it's time to fly home while your friends and family sails away... Then no, I guess you technically aren't stranded. If you just want to hire a car to drive you ~100 miles to another port, or purchase a little ticket on a hopper that crosses a boarder to catch up with your ship, then you need a passport.

 

If it were me, I would probably consider an overnight port to port something in line with an "excursion by surprise" while I might consider flying home a huge disappointment. But that's just me.

 

I guess I didn't (and still don't) understand what you mean by "Flying into the US with nothing but a driver's license isn't that hard". I figured you need a passport to do that.

Edited by time4u2go
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I'm a little confused. We have passports and always bring them on cruises..... But are you saying that we need to being them ashore on excursions in case we get ill while off the ship? I would never think of carrying my passport around, to get stolen, but I do carry a copy. Would that not be enough?

 

A copy of the relevant pages of a passport simply provide you with the data that will be required by a consular official in preparing emergency travel documentation.

 

It comes down to deciding which is riskier: having a passport stolen or not being aboard when the ship sails. Since carrying some form of photo id ashore is necessary in most ports I tend to go with my passport. After all, a driver's license is as likely to be stolen as a passport.

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A copy of the relevant pages of a passport simply provide you with the data that will be required by a consular official in preparing emergency travel documentation.

 

 

 

It comes down to deciding which is riskier: having a passport stolen or not being aboard when the ship sails. Since carrying some form of photo id ashore is necessary in most ports I tend to go with my passport. After all, a driver's license is as likely to be stolen as a passport.

 

 

But a drivers license is not as valuable as a passport. I would prefer to keep my passport safe on the ship. Of course I am not the type that cuts returning to the ship close on any of the Caribbean ports. In Europe it didn't usually matter because getting to the next port if one missed the ship was not that difficult and would not usually require a passport unless it was the last port. .

 

Oddly some don't any take photo ID ashore. This year at both Bermuda and the Bahamas that do require photo ID there were passengers that got stopped at the gate. And passengers were clearly told to take photo ID with them. What they did was check their names against a the ships manifest and then let them on. That took about ten minutes for a member of my group.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Edited by Charles4515
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But a drivers license is not as valuable as a passport. I would prefer to keep my passport safe on the ship. Of course I am not the type that cuts returning to the ship close on any of the Caribbean ports. In Europe it didn't usually matter because getting to the next port if one missed the ship was not that difficult and would not usually require a passport unless it was the last port. .

 

Oddly some don't any take photo ID ashore. This year at both Bermuda and the Bahamas that do require photo ID there were passengers that got stopped at the gate. And passengers were clearly told to take photo ID with them. What they did was check their names against a the ships manifest and then let them on. That took about ten minutes for a member of my group.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

For me loss of a driver's license would be a much bigger burden. Losing a passport would simply lead to delay entering the country. Without a drivers license I would be dependent on others for transportation until I could get the license replaced.

 

I am constantly surprised at the number of people who think that the only reason one might miss a sailing is due to one's own negligence. While there are those who cut things too close, there are many other reasons one might be delayed. Something as simple as a trip and fall leading to a hospital visit for example; being a witness to a traffic accident; worse yet, being a victim.

 

I carry photo id at home. I can see no reason not to do the same when on vacation. I do not expect those in foreign countries to recognize or accept a driver's license from an unfamiliar jurisdiction.

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Something to think about I guess. I never thought about taking our passport ashore with us, just sea pass card and drivers license.

 

I have a friend that went to Paris recently and the first day there she got her wallet and passport stolen. just one reason I leave ours in the safe.

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  • 1 month later...
There is very low risk of missing the ship. And it has been reported in other threads in the past that if you leave your passport in the cruise ship safe they will retrieve it if you are not onboard when the ship sails and hand it to the port agent. I have never taken my passport off the ship at port except Russia which requires it to be shown before entering and I never will unless a country requires it. I have also been on a couple of cruises where the cruise line took and held my passport so they had when I was in port. But if it makes you fell better to take it off that is your choice. Hopefully you won't get robbed or pick pocketed. US Passports sell high on the black market so the crooks like to get those.

 

 

My husband recently took an excursion booked through the cruise line. It was supposed to return to the ship two hours before leaving Port. At 3:55 when we were supposed to depart he was still not on board and the ship was calling me to find out if he was on board. Another words even booking through the Cruise line he almost missed the ship. We always carry a credit card, our passport, our cruise card, and cash when we get off the ship.

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My husband recently took an excursion booked through the cruise line. It was supposed to return to the ship two hours before leaving Port. At 3:55 when we were supposed to depart he was still not on board and the ship was calling me to find out if he was on board. Another words even booking through the Cruise line he almost missed the ship. We always carry a credit card, our passport, our cruise card, and cash when we get off the ship.

 

If he had missed the ship and was on a cruise line excursion the cruise line would have been responsible for getting his passport to him if he had not had it on him. Also getting him to the next port.

 

It comes down to each person deciding which is riskier and whose advice to follow. I have made my decision based on what travel experts and the State Department recommend. And my own experiences cruising since 1996 in the Caribbean and Europe. For how I plan my port activities and past experience I am confident I won't be missing the ship. I won't be taking my passport off the ship. You should do what you feel is best in regards to taking your passport off the ship with you.

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  • 2 months later...

DHS on Jan. 8, 2016 announced the “final” implementation of the REAL ID Act.

 

The law established minimum security standards for the issuance of sources of identification, such as driver’s licenses, and prohibited federal agencies from accepting for certain purposes driver’s licenses and ID cards from states not meeting the act’s minimum standards.

 

Air travelers with a driver’s license or ID card issued by a state that doesn’t meet the requirements of the act will have to present an alternative form of identification, such as a passport, to board a domestic commercial flight.

 

The deadline isn’t for another two years — Jan. 22, 2018, to be exact — air travelers are nervous about their IDs not working.

 

Only 23 states (including the District and Maryland) are compliant or certified as making progress toward being compliant with the REAL ID Act.

 

Another 27 states and territories (including Virginia) have been granted extensions.

Six states and territories — Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, Washington and American Samoa — are noncompliant and do not currently have extensions.

 

It gives the states that want to be compliant — and there are only a few that aren’t — time to either adopt or figure out an alternative before the deadline.

 

The actual deadline for REAL ID won’t come until at least Oct. 1, 2020, when every air traveler will need a REAL ID-compliant license or another acceptable form of identification for domestic air travel.

 

Domestic air travel may be about to get even more confusing so get a passport while you can, in case you NEED it just to fly to the port.

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It gives the states that want to be compliant — and there are only a few that aren’t — time to either adopt or figure out an alternative before the deadline.

 

The actual deadline for REAL ID won’t come until at least Oct. 1, 2020, when every air traveler will need a REAL ID-compliant license or another acceptable form of identification for domestic air travel.

 

Domestic air travel may be about to get even more confusing so get a passport while you can, in case you NEED it just to fly to the port.

 

No need to get a passport for domestic air travel. Don't confuse people.

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