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Crown Princess - minor fire


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On the Crown last night, apparently we had a minor fire. Was in the dining room around 9:30 when we noticed the ship shudder, then the motors stop (at least the vibration I assume is caused by the motors stopped). Immediately, there was an emergency announcement over the loudspeaker - a single tone followed by instructions for the crew.

 

About ten or fifteen minutes later, the Captain came on board and announced that there had been a fire near the incinerator which had quickly been put out, and that we were in no danger.

 

Being that we didn't feel the ship start moving again, after dinner we headed out to the deck and saw that we were still not moving, just floating in the Sound (the Crown was headed from Seattle to Vancouver BC in the Puget Sound). It was actually very peaceful to be out on the water with the ship quiet.

 

It was about two hours later before the ship began to move again. We made it to Vancouver on time and at no time did the hotel power go out, or were other services affected. I actually wonder how many people on board even knew we stopped!

 

Kind of curious about how often this happens - after the fire on the Carnival Ship in St Thomas the other week, was starting to get worried when we didn't get back underway. Half expected more announcements that the issue was bigger than indicated.

 

But kudos to Princess and the Crown crew for quietly taking care of this incident, which could have been much worse!

Edited by DandDM
typo
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Cruise Ships have incinerators? I guess that's better than dumping it in the gyres. I thought they would off load the waste at ports.

 

 

They do a little bit of everything-incinerate, emulsify, compact. The Behind the Scenes tour shoes you how they do it.

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The minor fire had absolutely nothing to do with the vessel being stopped for several hours. Crown debarked her Puget Sound Pilot at Port Angeles at 8:45pm. The Canadian pilot was to board off Victoria at 11:15pm. The distance between the two pilot station is 14 miles. Vessel Traffic Control send Crown Princess to an anchorage off Victoria to await her pilot time, where she sat from 9:10 until 11:20. There was too much traffic in the area for her to drift or loiter between 8:45 and 11:15. The shudder was her port anchor being dropped.

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The minor fire had absolutely nothing to do with the vessel being stopped for several hours. Crown debarked her Puget Sound Pilot at Port Angeles at 8:45pm. The Canadian pilot was to board off Victoria at 11:15pm. The distance between the two pilot station is 14 miles. Vessel Traffic Control send Crown Princess to an anchorage off Victoria to await her pilot time, where she sat from 9:10 until 11:20. There was too much traffic in the area for her to drift or loiter between 8:45 and 11:15. The shudder was her port anchor being dropped.

 

Very interesting. Thanks for your post.

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They are always on top of the fire watch and glad they got it handled.

 

They take fire onboard very seriously as its probably one of the worst things that could happen on a ship.

 

A fire on a boat is very scary. We had one on our first sailboat. My husband burnt his hand badly trying to put it out. I unfortunately panicked. Insurance covered everything though.

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The minor fire had absolutely nothing to do with the vessel being stopped for several hours. Crown debarked her Puget Sound Pilot at Port Angeles at 8:45pm. The Canadian pilot was to board off Victoria at 11:15pm. The distance between the two pilot station is 14 miles. Vessel Traffic Control send Crown Princess to an anchorage off Victoria to await her pilot time, where she sat from 9:10 until 11:20. There was too much traffic in the area for her to drift or loiter between 8:45 and 11:15. The shudder was her port anchor being dropped.

Thanks for the explanation because when I checked Marine Traffic after the OP's post last night the Crown showed at anchor & I wondered why.

 

Shipboard fires are a major concern and decades ago I had flight deck & compartment fire fighting training in the Navy...it was quite an experience.

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The minor fire had absolutely nothing to do with the vessel being stopped for several hours. Crown debarked her Puget Sound Pilot at Port Angeles at 8:45pm. The Canadian pilot was to board off Victoria at 11:15pm. The distance between the two pilot station is 14 miles. Vessel Traffic Control send Crown Princess to an anchorage off Victoria to await her pilot time, where she sat from 9:10 until 11:20. There was too much traffic in the area for her to drift or loiter between 8:45 and 11:15. The shudder was her port anchor being dropped.

 

Thank for the info! This actually makes a lot of sense and explains why we were stopped, yet still on time to Vancouver. Just a coincidence that the two events happened in such a short time frame.

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Danddm-yes you had lots of time! The distance to Canada Place East from the Constance Bank #1 anchorage is 83 miles. Crown "ran slow" at about 11 knots in order to be turned and backed in and then off the berth at 06:30 when the shore side lines crew was ordered. When she sailed later in the day, she knocked that trip off is 4hrs rather than the 7 hours you took!

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We watched you sail over the horizon late yesterday afternoon with the setting golden sun reflecting off the ship, it all looked very beautiful. However, it was also a sad reminder that the 2015 Alaska season is coming to an end.

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We had a similar occurrence on the Crown on the Oct/14 LA>Hawai>S.Pacific>LA cruise. During dinner there was the emergency signal and some crew left very rapidly to report to their emergency stations. Within a very few minutes, the Captain announced that there had been a small fire "near the 'fish cleaning station' " but that it was fully contained and there had been no damage or injury. We wondered what could cause a fire in a 'fish cleaning station', but were very impressed with the sense of urgency and rapid response as well as the prompt reassurance that all was well.

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On the Crown last night, apparently we had a minor fire. Was in the dining room around 9:30 when we noticed the ship shudder, then the motors stop (at least the vibration I assume is caused by the motors stopped). Immediately, there was an emergency announcement over the loudspeaker - a single tone followed by instructions for the crew.

 

About ten or fifteen minutes later, the Captain came on board and announced that there had been a fire near the incinerator which had quickly been put out, and that we were in no danger.

 

Being that we didn't feel the ship start moving again, after dinner we headed out to the deck and saw that we were still not moving, just floating in the Sound (the Crown was headed from Seattle to Vancouver BC in the Puget Sound). It was actually very peaceful to be out on the water with the ship quiet.

 

It was about two hours later before the ship began to move again. We made it to Vancouver on time and at no time did the hotel power go out, or were other services affected. I actually wonder how many people on board even knew we stopped!

 

Kind of curious about how often this happens - after the fire on the Carnival Ship in St Thomas the other week, was starting to get worried when we didn't get back underway. Half expected more announcements that the issue was bigger than indicated.

 

But kudos to Princess and the Crown crew for quietly taking care of this incident, which could have been much worse!

 

Interesting. When we were on the Crown in March 2014 there was a fire near the incinerator. We weren't held up like you were though.

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Hi

 

Ships take fire as one of the greatest dangers that can happen onboard.

 

The fire control on the bridge goes off almost hourly, however most have little

 

to do with a fire, smoking in the wrong place, two hairs dyers in on cabin etc.

 

However have been on Crown when a passenger set fire to her cabin through

 

smoking, she was removed from the ship the next port, ship made no

 

announcement apart from the fire team call, it was an officer who told us what

 

happened, the next day a crew member triggered the alarm by smoking.

 

yours shogun

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