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It's not simple. The sun doesn't simply rise in the east and set in the west. Generally speaking, in the North Atlantic, over the course of the day there will be considerably more sunshine on the southern side of the ship than the northern; that would be starboard if going eastbound, and port if going westbound. The opposite would be true in the southern hemisphere. That's why, when you build your house in the northern hemisphere, if you want to maximize solar warmth you put lots of windows on the side with the southern exposure. However, depending on how far north you are and the time of year, the sun may rise and set somewhat toward the north, and swing around to be on the south during the middle hours of the day. So even if you are on the port side you may get some sun on your balcony early or late in the day, depending on exactly the vessel's heading.

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Just for the very few who might someday do a northern crossing(Iceland/ Greenland-awesome) , east or west bound, you might prefer the north side of the ship. You have a great chance to see the northern lights at night. Not as many sea days either.

 

Agreed, we had that and it was wonderful to be able to be on the balcony without all the lights that the top decks had on..:D

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You cannot generalize as the position of the sun depends on both the time of year and course of the ship (big difference going to Amsterdam vs Barcelona).

Hank

 

Fiinally, a voice of reason! As well as the changing positions of the sun, ships don't sail in a straight line west to east, nor do they sail "as the crow flies" from one point to another. The captain may also alter the ship's course for weather patterns.

 

Unless you have sailed on the same itinerary, and dates, your experience may be only applicable to your sailing.

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For our westbound TA (BCN to FLL) i read all the threads re which side of the ship for sunlight as DH loves sitting out on the balcony. So I selected a cabin on the port side and from the time we left the Canaries DH could not use the balcony because it was way too hot. The Equinox used the southern route that time so that may have made a difference.

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Transatlantic cruisers from the UK always used the maxim 'posh' when choosing a cabin. It stands for Port Out, Starboard Home. Perhaps they knew a thing or two !!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums mobile app

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That is the problem when you want a bit of sun but not so much where it becomes uncomfortable.

 

So true. We were in a corner aft on the fall TA port side and it was so hot we seldom could sit on our balcony. Starboard going west for us in the future.

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We have done 8 TA's all west bound. As other's have said the Starboard side gets substantially more sun in the afternoons on East Bound.

 

I love the urban legend of the word POSH -

 

The origin of the English word POSH is interesting. Back in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it was the thing to do for Englishmen (and women) to go to India for holiday (vacation). They went by steamship. In those days, having a tan was not meant for the upper class, because it meant that one was a manual laborer or field worker.

 

The route to India meant that the ship went out with the afternoon sun (the hottest and most likely to tan one) on the right or starboard side. And returning from India the afternoon sun was on the left or port side. To avoid the tanning sun (and paying for the more expensive side) a wealthy person would ask for a ticket "portside out starboard home". The ticket person would stamp P.O.S.H. on the ticket. Eventually, one had only to ask for POSH. Thus, the word became part of the language to mean better accommodations... for a price.

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We have done 8 TA's all west bound. As other's have said the Starboard side gets substantially more sun in the afternoons on East Bound.

 

I love the urban legend of the word POSH -

 

The origin of the English word POSH is interesting. Back in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it was the thing to do for Englishmen (and women) to go to India for holiday (vacation). They went by steamship. In those days, having a tan was not meant for the upper class, because it meant that one was a manual laborer or field worker.

 

The route to India meant that the ship went out with the afternoon sun (the hottest and most likely to tan one) on the right or starboard side. And returning from India the afternoon sun was on the left or port side. To avoid the tanning sun (and paying for the more expensive side) a wealthy person would ask for a ticket "portside out starboard home". The ticket person would stamp P.O.S.H. on the ticket. Eventually, one had only to ask for POSH. Thus, the word became part of the language to mean better accommodations... for a price.

There seems to be no solid consensus for the etymology of the word, but there is strong agreement that the "portside out starboard home" acronym is indeed nothing but an urban legend.

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Transatlantic cruisers from the UK always used the maxim 'posh' when choosing a cabin. It stands for Port Out, Starboard Home. Perhaps they knew a thing or two !!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums mobile app

 

Welcome to cruise critic, and yes POSH is the norm for the transatlantics heading to NY from England and then back again, thus keeping the sun and light on that side.:D

Edited by MicCanberra
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Once you go aft, you'll never go back. 4th year in a row back there for us coming up on eastbound Equinox.

 

Maybe I'm weird, but I finally had an aft cabin for the first time on my most recent cruise, and it really bothered me that I could not see where the ship was going at all. I guess I'm a back seat driver even when on a cruise!

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Maybe I'm weird, but I finally had an aft cabin for the first time on my most recent cruise, and it really bothered me that I could not see where the ship was going at all. I guess I'm a back seat driver even when on a cruise!

 

LOl, sounds like you need to have a direct line to the captain so they can keep you informed.:D

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Maybe I'm weird, but I finally had an aft cabin for the first time on my most recent cruise, and it really bothered me that I could not see where the ship was going at all. I guess I'm a back seat driver even when on a cruise!

 

I'd rather not see all those cabins and thousands of people in front of me. I find it better to turn my back, look at the wake and pretend I have the ship to myself :D.

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Maybe I'm weird, but I finally had an aft cabin for the first time on my most recent cruise, and it really bothered me that I could not see where the ship was going at all. I guess I'm a back seat driver even when on a cruise!

 

 

We are the exact opposite! We love Aft facing cabins. [emoji12]

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We are the exact opposite! We love Aft facing cabins. [emoji12]

We do too! Of course, we usually tip the Captain generously so that he'll cruise in reverse for a little while every day, especially when entering ports. ;)

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Maybe I'm weird, but I finally had an aft cabin for the first time on my most recent cruise, and it really bothered me that I could not see where the ship was going at all. I guess I'm a back seat driver even when on a cruise!

 

That's why they broadcast the view from the bridge on TV; you can see where you're going and where you!ve been from the aft cabins :D

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I may be overly sensitive but my experience with aft cabins is that I can feel the vibration from the engine room or the propellers, or whatever it is and it drives me crazy....and it doesn't seem to get much better on higher floors. Just being in the aft of the ship, as in the dining rooms and buffet, I can feel it and it jars my bones and head...I can take it in small doses, but trying to sleep is torture. I prefer forward, close to the elevators....no vibrations there at all! :)

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If you don't get seasick, I'd suggest aft balcony. You get either the sunrise or sunset. On our cruise out to Hawaii, we had a lot of pitch & roll, but we didn't notice the engines up on deck 8. We had aft on Sapphire Princess, and near aft on Star Princess.

Edited by knittinggirl
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I may be overly sensitive but my experience with aft cabins is that I can feel the vibration from the engine room or the propellers, or whatever it is and it drives me crazy....and it doesn't seem to get much better on higher floors. Just being in the aft of the ship, as in the dining rooms and buffet, I can feel it and it jars my bones and head...I can take it in small doses, but trying to sleep is torture. I prefer forward, close to the elevators....no vibrations there at all! :)

 

 

Are you specifically referring to M-Class ships? We've been staying in AFT cabins on S-Class ships for the past few years, and haven't really noticed any vibration.

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Are you specifically referring to M-Class ships? We've been staying in AFT cabins on S-Class ships for the past few years, and haven't really noticed any vibration.

 

I think it is more noticeable on M class ships when in the Dining rooms than on S class ships. It also depends where in the dining room you are, sometimes it is quite noticeable as the fluid in you glasses on the table are really rippling on some tables.

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Are you specifically referring to M-Class ships? We've been staying in AFT cabins on S-Class ships for the past few years, and haven't really noticed any vibration.

I have not been on a Celebrity S-class ship yet, and for the last few years I've been mostly on Royal Caribbean ships, both big, really big, and medium sized....and I can feel it on all ships and on all decks (of course more on the lower decks.) I will be on the Reflection in a few weeks for 16 days so I will have a lot of opportunity to feel, or not feel, those vibrations. I hope you are correct and there are none. :)

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