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Why does HAL say this? (another PassPort Q)

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Passports are normally surrendered to and held by the pursers on board to facilitate clearances in ports of call. It is prudent to photocopy the identification page of your passport and pack it separately, in case of loss or damage to the original.

 

We have visited twenty five non-US ports of call on three different HAL cruises and there has never been any mention of surrendering our passports nor have I ever heard of it on CC.

 

It also says this:

It is your sole responsibility to obtain all necessary documents for all ports of call on your itinerary. Requirements for your voyage may be found on Holland America Line’s website

 

Well, HEY, I'm on "Holland America Line's website"! and you're not telling me any requirements.

 

Here is my situation (and I hate being that person to start up yet another passport thread) -- we invited Bro and SIL to join us on June's Alaska R/T out of Vancouver. Their passports expire in September (three months after cruise) -- remembering reading "6 months" on the HAL website, I urged them to renew ASAP -- but $220 is a significant sum to just cough up for them. So on 'Ask a Cruise Question', someone asked something similar and THREE people all stated six months after return date was NOT necessary for Canada.

 

Sure enough, it is just a "suggestion" on the website. I looked it up on the State Department's website, and sure enough six months to expiry is NOT a requirement.

 

If it's not a requirement of the country, HAL can't require it, can they? I obviously do not want to have them be turned away from boarding!

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We have visited twenty five non-US ports of call on three different HAL cruises and there has never been any mention of surrendering our passports nor have I ever heard of it on CC.

 

It also says this:

 

 

Well, HEY, I'm on "Holland America Line's website"! and you're not telling me any requirements.

 

Here is my situation (and I hate being that person to start up yet another passport thread) -- we invited Bro and SIL to join us on June's Alaska R/T out of Vancouver. Their passports expire in September (three months after cruise) -- remembering reading "6 months" on the HAL website, I urged them to renew ASAP -- but $220 is a significant sum to just cough up for them. So on 'Ask a Cruise Question', someone asked something similar and THREE people all stated six months after return date was NOT necessary for Canada.

 

Sure enough, it is just a "suggestion" on the website. I looked it up on the State Department's website, and sure enough six months to expiry is NOT a requirement.

 

If it's not a requirement of the country, HAL can't require it, can they? I obviously do not want to have them be turned away from boarding!

 

 

 

 

Keeping passports with the Purser's Office might depend on the cruise. I have seen it done on MANY cruises.... especially on longer cruises.

 

If officials boarding in a port require to see the passport it normal to hand the passports to the Purser before so that the passengers can be checked through lots faster. After seeing the official the passport is handed in after to the Purser and the same routine can be kept for the next port. Again, it depends on the cruise. Not only HAL... same routine will go with other cruise lines. After the final cruise port the are returned.... depends on the final disembarking port.

 

 

6 Month requirement. That is USUAL on every cruise line. If HAL tells you to have it you might argue the point. Best to talk HAL to ask them directly. It might very well not need to IF you are from one country and IF you are going to one other country. HAL carries dozens of nationals on every cruise. They cannot possibly cover every situation. Certainly with my passport (UK) it must be valid for 6 months for the end of the travel period. It is certainly required if I come into the USA or Canada.

 

Check HAL. If you get the wrong information you will not be allowed on board!

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HAL can deny boarding if it is their requirement. They should get it in writing. Agree that HAL deals with many different nationalities and cannot account for every situation or changes that may be implemented by different countries.

 

Yes, all of the cruise lines hold passports for certain ports. Some countries have a requirement to see them. We have had ours held in Asia, South America and in Antarctica. We always get them back if we are leaving the ship overnight which we have done multiple times to go to places like Macchu Picchu, Angkor Wat, and Aurangabad on our own. We have also had them held in some countries in Europe.

Edited by Jade13

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Surrendering passports does depend totally on the ports visited. We have been on 18 cruises, and have surrendered our passports on 4 of them. Baltic, Med, Australia and South America. So it does happen.

 

It's been our experience the ship does this to expedite clearing of the ship at a port. For example, on our Eurodam Baltic/Norway/Ireland cruise, we had to surrender our passports after St Petersburg (where you go through a stringent face to face passport check). Collect them before the Shetland Islands, who required a face to face meeting with Immigration personnel. It was a huge cluster, and delayed clearing the ship by 2 hours. We then surrendered our passports again, getting the back after our Dublin stop. We (the ship actually) acquired an Irish passport stamp while we wondered around Dublin. So Authorities do check passports when the ship holds them.

Edited by CruiserBruce

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We have visited twenty five non-US ports of call on three different HAL cruises and there has never been any mention of surrendering our passports nor have I ever heard of it on CC.

We've been on 18 HAL cruises and the only one where we had to surrender our passports at boarding was one from Venice to Istanbul and back. They were returned after our last port of call, which was in Greece, so I still don't know if it was Greece or Turkey that required the ship to hold them.

 

Going into Russia (St Petersburg) we had to turn over our passports about a day before and were given them back in order to carry them on shore.

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Typically how passports on some ships and depends on the cruise. On last Xmas cruise the passport was handed on first sea day. It was handed a few days before the end of the cruise.

 

When handed in a receipt is given. No messing around.

 

A label is attached... see the photo.

 

Your Passenger Number on the Passenger Manifest.

Surname

First Name

Cabin Number.

 

I found out that it best to keep the label on it after the cruise. If you remove it the residue of glue stays on it! Yuk! Next cruise.... they will put a new label over it. Hey.... just a way of bragging! ;-)

520651883_PASSPORTScan.jpg.3c6b5e7c831350d68dd18dae524e68df.jpg

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For a cruise departing from Vancouver, the passport validity for entry to Canada is irrelevant to HAL. Passengers will be admitted or refused by CBSA upon first arrival in Canada (whether by air or at the land border).

 

Passengers will go through pre-clearance to the USA prior to checking in with HAL. Upon return to Canada, all passengers who were in temporary resident status in Canada are free to return to Canada provided that their non-immigrant status extended to or beyond their disembarkation date because status in Canada does not cease with a visit to the United States within the original period of admission. The same rule applies even to visitors who require a visa to enter Canada and did so on a single entry visa.

 

The only exception would be people who are arriving in Canada with a single entry transit visa--but those people would be unlikely to make it through pre-clearance into the USA because they would be unable to demonstrate the ability to leave the USA at the end of the cruise.

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Quite right. The point is it that the Visa or ESTA etc.... are usually have to be valid for at least 6 months. Yes?

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Surrendering passports is not that unusual.

 

What is your problem with it? Would you prefer to be get up at say, 5:30 am to have your documents inspected in your presence or perhaps have your ships clearance delayed because a fellow passenger forgot to show up and cannot be located?

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Will you need a passport to enter Canada prior to the cruise? Perhaps you should contact Canadian immigration. I don't know the answer.

 

Reading the World Cruise blogs, I found that those passengers do turn in their passports to the Purser.

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I just looked up US citizen requirements for entering Canada: http://www.us-passport-service-guide.com/canada-travel-req

 

Please keep in mind that the airline may require the 6 months so check your airline requirements if flying to Vancouver. Also it is worth mentioning that Canadian officials consider a DUI a valid reason to deny entry to Canada so if there is one on anyone in your group look into getting a pardon if possible. The same link above states:

 

If you've ever been convicted of a DUI in the United States, and you're planning a visit to Canada you face possible exclusion. Approaching a Canadian land border without researching entry requirements ahead of time, or going through the proper process of a rehabilitation application is a roll of the dice. You can try to enter by applying for a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP) at the border, and while it's possible to gain admittance to Canada in this way, it's unlikely, especially if it is clear you're ineligible. More often than not, you'll be turned away, and the risk comes with a non-refundable $200 application fee. The best idea is to first contact an experienced immigration lawyer in the province where you plan to travel to avoid any unpleasant surprises.

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The cruise line might word a warning as a "suggestion" when it's actually a requirement. My passport runs out in February, so I'm OK for my cruise in July. As soon as we get home, I'll send in my passport for renewal, because we're taking a cruise at Christmas.

 

Both are on Cunard. When I did the voyage personalizer for July it was all fine. For December, I saw my passport number and expiration date, no comment. But when I clicked to submit the info, a message popped up saying that my passport would expire shortly after the cruise and they "suggest" I renew it before we sail.

 

Now, I'm pretty sure less than 2 months is too little time on a passport. But they didn't say I "should" or I "must." I think they need to be more direct in what they tell you.

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Keeping passports with the Purser's Office might depend on the cruise. I have seen it done on MANY cruises.... especially on longer cruises.

 

We have experienced this many many times on European cruises.

 

As to the six months, I don't know the reason for this. It would seem a passport would be good up until the day it expires but I believe every line says the same about 6 months.

Edited by KirkNC

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We have experienced this many many times on European cruises.

 

As to the six months, I don't know the reason for this. It would seem a passport would be good up until the day it expires but I believe every line says the same about 6 months.

 

I think it's because they don't want your passport to run out while you're away and be somehow responsible for you. Six months gives them a wide margin of error. I thought I read that people used to let it run out during a trip abroad and just run over to the Embassy to get a new one, which was a PITA for the Embassy. Not sure if this is true or a travel legend...

 

I've had my passport collected on cruises. It's a nuisance for the ship's staff, but they don't choose to do this. It's the rule of the country you're visiting.

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A reason for the 6 month valid period after you return is in case you become ill and have to stay in a foreign country for awhile. If your passport expires while you're out of country, it will present major problems trying to get home later.:)

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We have experienced this many many times on European cruises.

 

As to the six months, I don't know the reason for this. It would seem a passport would be good up until the day it expires but I believe every line says the same about 6 months.

 

There is a blurb on the State Department passport renewal page that "many" countries require that your U.S. passport have "as much as 6 months" validity remaining though it doesn't say it's a requirement to renew if you have less than six months remaining (just that you can avoid the hassle of a last minute passport renewal). I'm going to guess it's just easier for the cruise lines, airlines, etc. to go with the Fed's recommendation regarding the six month time period - how vigorously each company enforces it will vary I suppose.

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Just be aware that if you have any legal problems such as possible warrants, unresolved parole or fines problems etc that are in computer programs or someone with your name has a flag you might have problems getting back in the country after an Alaskan cruise. Ship's passengers are run through some computer program and outstanding warrants/watches will get you a visit from the police. Very traumatic if it happens:eek: and can take a bit of time to clear up. Know that legal problems need to be resolved before the cruise.

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Just be aware that if you have any legal problems such as possible warrants, unresolved parole or fines problems etc that are in computer programs or someone with your name has a flag you might have problems getting back in the country after an Alaskan cruise. Ship's passengers are run through some computer program and outstanding warrants/watches will get you a visit from the police. Very traumatic if it happens:eek: and can take a bit of time to clear up. Know that legal problems need to be resolved before the cruise.

 

That is possible, but you will have a bigger problem trying to get into Canada. US will not refuse admittance if you have convictions for some crimes, Canada will refuse admittance for any felony and all DUI related offenses. I know of several people who had DUI issues in their distant past who were refused entry into Canada.

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Be 100% sure. On our recent Asia cruise friends of people on board denied boarding in Hong Kong because their passports were within 6 months by the end of the cruise. They had to fly home.

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Well there are some good reason for the six month requirement. I had not thought about illness. Lord help me if I have to stay in another country for six months because I am sick but anything can happen. Also running the risk of not being admitted to another country is obviously not good.

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Here's a link that works I hope. Apparently the issue is re-entering the US.

http://www.us-passport-service-guide.com/canada-travel-requirements.html

 

"Canada travel requirements for entrance into that country are different from the requirements to re-enter the United States. While Canadian law allows all American citizens entering Canada to show government-issued photo ID (e.g. Driver's License) and proof of U.S. citizenship such as a U.S. birth certificate, naturalization certificate, or expired U.S. passport to enter, the United States does not accept these documents.

 

U.S. citizens who travel to Canada must present a valid passport to re-enter the United States by air or a passport, passport card or other approved WHTI and WHTI-compliant document when entering by land or sea."

Edited by shrimp56

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Keeping passports with the Purser's Office might depend on the cruise. I have seen it done on MANY cruises.... especially on longer cruises.

 

6 Month requirement. Certainly with my passport (UK) it must be valid for 6 months for the end of the travel period. It is certainly required if I come into the USA or Canada.

 

Check HAL. If you get the wrong information you will not be allowed on board!

 

Wow, so basically you pay for a ten year passport and only get it for 9-1/2 ?

How long do you have to have it before you can start using it?

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Thanks to all -- the Bro and SIL are so excited for this cruise they sent their renewals in the next day after I told them (last Friday). The money could have gone to something more fun, :( .

 

kevingastreich -- yes for almost all countries/international travel OTHER THAN CANADA, a 10-year passport is good for 9.5 years.

 

iancal: my "problem" is as 3rdgenCunarder said -- the ambiguity of the language, and what I perceived as inaccuracy of the Purser thing, never having had to surrender mine. I thought it was a very old situation that HAL just hadn't 'fixed' the website! Not like that has ever happened!

 

The HAL website sending me to the HAL website (with no link to a page or anything) is still odd.

 

Water under the bridge anyhow; the passports in question are on their way to renewal.

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Wow, so basically you pay for a ten year passport and only get it for 9-1/2 ?

How long do you have to have it before you can start using it?

 

As long as it takes to open the envelope and sign it.

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Usually, the airline you depart the US on, will check your passport for the usual 6 month validity. If the country you are traveling to requires a 6 month pad, then your airline will deny boarding. The reason is that if you are denied entry into your destination country, the airline that erroneously boarded you, is responsible to fly you back to your home country at their expense. They don't want to get stuck with that expense, so they deny you boarding at your first point of travel. The same holds true for one-way tickets and pet documentation. Most countries want to be sure they won't be stuck with you if you run out of money for whatever reason, so they require a return or continuing ticket. Same for pets. If you don't have a microchip in Fido, or the proper health documents, the airline will not board you. If they do, and your pet is denied entry into your destination country, the airline must fly you and your pet back home at their expense.

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