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Dissabled free entry into museums in italy

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Hi, I'm from the uk & was looking on this website re tickets for the Vatican & Coliseum in Rome, when I spotted that you & a carer can enter free.

 

We emailed them to find out the details and they just came back with this reply. Does anyone know what 74% disabled will mean. My specialist doctor will definitely write me a letter, but unsure what is needed to be mentioned.

 

: info@rome-museum.com

Date: 14/04/2016 09:42 (GMT+00:00)

To:

Subject: Re: Disability ticket for Rome

 

documents testifying disability (over 74%) from a doctor

 

Thanks for any help with this.

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Your doctor will understand what "74%" disability" means and whether it applies to your situation .

 

There are standard diability indexs used for various medical conditions world wide in the Medical and as well as the Insurance Fields that denotes degree of disability. The example shown below is in regards to a spinal cord injury is based on the Oswestry Disability index ., The example below may or may not apply to our condition but it gives a good idea of what 74% disability means.

 

  • 0%-20%: Minimal disability: This group can cope with most living activities. Usually no treatment is indicated, apart from advice on lifting, sitting posture, physical fitness, and diet. In this group some patients have particular difficulty with sitting, and this may be important if their occupation is sedentary, e.g., a typist or truck driver.
  • 20%-40% Moderate disability: This group experiences more pain and problems with sitting, lifting, and standing. Travel and social life are more difficult and they may well be off work. Personal care, sexual activity, and sleeping are not grossly affected, and the back condition can usually be managed by conservative means.
  • 40%-60%: Severe disability: Pain remains the main problem in this group of patients, but travel, personal care, social life, sexual activity, and sleep are also affected. These patients require detailed investigation.
  • 60%-80%: Crippled: Back pain impinges on all aspects of these patients’ lives—both at home and at work—and positive intervention is required.
  • 80%-100%: These patients are either bed-bound or exaggerating their symptoms. This can be evaluated by careful observation of the patient during medical examination.

Edited by xxoocruiser

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Our experience in Rome, the Vatican and in Venice has been that admission to museums and some other attractions is free if you are disabled. As Dudette is in a wheelchair there was no question but in the Vatican they did say that they would have preferred to see a government issued disability card or a handicapped parking badge. You also go to the head of the line at many of the attractions.

 

I can't speak for Rome but in Venice on the public transportation the disabled person pay but the carer goes for free.

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Our experience in Rome, the Vatican and in Venice has been that admission to museums and some other attractions is free if you are disabled. As Dudette is in a wheelchair there was no question but in the Vatican they did say that they would have preferred to see a government issued disability card or a handicapped parking badge. You also go to the head of the line at many of the attractions.

 

I can't speak for Rome but in Venice on the public transportation the disabled person pay but the carer goes for free.

 

Note that a Parking Badge or Placard which it's more commonly referred to in the USA is not consider legal proof of a person being 74% or more disabled. It just means that the individual who the placard was assigned to has met their State of residency's eligibility criteria. Criteria that varies from state to state.

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Note that a Parking Badge or Placard which it's more commonly referred to in the USA is not consider legal proof of a person being 74% or more disabled. It just means that the individual who the placard was assigned to has met their State of residency's eligibility criteria. Criteria that varies from state to state.

 

Note: the Parking Badge is what was suggested to us by the ticket booth at the Vatican Museum as being adequate proof....I also happen to have residence in both Canada & the US and am fully aware that a Badge = Placard and have heard it referred to either way in both countries.

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Hi, I'm from the uk & was looking on this website re tickets for the Vatican & Coliseum in Rome, when I spotted that you & a carer can enter free.

 

We emailed them to find out the details and they just came back with this reply. Does anyone know what 74% disabled will mean. My specialist doctor will definitely write me a letter, but unsure what is needed to be mentioned.

 

: info@rome-museum.com

Date: 14/04/2016 09:42 (GMT+00:00)

To:

Subject: Re: Disability ticket for Rome

 

documents testifying disability (over 74%) from a doctor

 

Thanks for any help with this.

 

In December 2014, I was able to get free tickets to the Vatican, the Colosseum and the museums in Florence. I believe that in the EU you are given a percentage of disability rating - we don't do that in the US. I had purchased tickets to the Academia and Uffizi in Florence ahead of time (so that we could get a reservation and not wait in line) and they refunded my money once they saw I was in a wheelchair (they just made the refund, I didn't even ask for it). I was not asked for a letter or other proof of disability. No questions were asked. Our driver in Rome used my California handicapped placard for the Colosseum tickets (I didn't go with him to the ticket booth).

 

I can't be of much help on what the letter should say since I didn't use one, but if you are obviously disabled you should not have a problem.

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Our experience at the Vatican museum and Sistine Chapel was that with a wheelchair you were advised to go against the flow of traffic.

 

An other thing with European museums and public galleries is that if you are in a chair you do not need to stand in line. If there is not a staff member monitoring the line go to the front anyway. In some cases they will have a side entrance for wheelchair bound people. Also in many of these buildings they have hidden "lifts" that will take you to floors above the ground floor and bring you back down but you do have to speak to someone with a radio or walkie-talkie to summon a lift operator.

 

In the UK attractions that are in the National Trust or Scottish National Trust will admit the carer for free as will a number of cathedrals and abbeys, again in the case of someone in a chair go to the front of the line. About the only 2 attractions in London that we found were not accessible at all were the Jewel Tower and the Banqueting Hall ..... which quite frankly was no big deal.

 

Sorry, we have dad no experience with scooters.

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Thank you for all your useful info, I have cystic fibrosis & I was in a wheelchair & on oxygen 24/7 & on almost continual iv antibiotics and would have definately made the required limit of 74%. I have never heard of this scaling system at my hospitals.

 

I am so lucky that I have received a double lung transplant and am no longer on the above & in a chair, although I do still get a little tired and my chest continually feels like it has a very tight belt round it. But compared to my pre tx life that is nothing. I have developed thyroid cancer due to my rejection drugs causing two nodes to grow in my thyroid, it has been removed now.

 

The thing I was concerned about was standing in line for two or more hours in the sun, as when on anti rejection drugs your skin is very thin & we have to wear factor 50 sun cream because skin cancer is caught very easily and must be avoided.

 

I have so much respect for people in wheelchairs, I know I will end up in one again as my transplanted lungs fail, but I hope I am one of the lucky ones & that day is way in the future & at the moment I am living every day as if it was my last & so thankful to my donor & their family. I hung on so long before admitting that I needed a chair when i went out, people staring, getting in your way etc, but I know this time not to struggle & accept it.

 

Wishing you all lots more cruising days & thank you once again for your help.

 

Chez

:-)

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I either take a wheelchair or mobility scooter abroad with me and travel extensively throughout Europe and UK. Most museums and attractions offer 'carer goes free'.

 

I always take a copy of my Blue Badge parking permit and my Disability Living Allowance from DWP. I have never been asked to show any documentation and automatically given the concession in all European countries ( including Italy).

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Hello all

This is my first day in the disabilty forum. I have no mobility issues but am severely hearing-impaired.

 

My hearing loss is such that I qualify for the Scottish Disabled travel card and for the National Disabled Rail Card.

 

On my last visit to France, I was able to skip the queues at The Louvre and also get free admission on production of my passes.

 

Does anyone know if this applies in Italy (i.e. for the sensorineural disabled rather than physically disabled)?

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Hi,

 

just a point, find out if your doctor will charge you for a "to whom it may concern" letter it may end up not being worth it!

 

Pete

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Chez2, while that rating system sucks for anyone with a SCI because it doesn't mention paralysis it is a vague start to an international idea about disability. Most people with SCIs, ALS, MS and other conditions that effect the brain and/or spinal cord have problems with high heat and sun also. For us it leads to sun stroke because many cannot perspire and many aggravate that because some of the medications we need suppress persperation even more. So yes, your doctor should include sun intolerance as a major part of your disability. A dear friend of mine has had so many spots removed and stitched up over the years he looks like a practice needle point cloth in places all from anti-rejection drugs. Remember to reapply the SPF every 4 hours and enjoy your trip!

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I know your GP will charge for any letter they have to write, but to be honest I don't bother with my GP for any of my medical needs as my Cystic fibrosis team are based in my same town & would rather go to them with any problems i have. I know both my Transplant & Cf team will write me a letter, plus I will be getting a fit to travel letter & a letter for customs with all me medications listed.

 

NorthernLite thank you for your advice, I do worry about skin cancer when I go out & apply factor 50, even when I just go to my village shop. I don't want to be staring death in the face for the 3rd time.

 

Strangely I don't sweat under my arms any more & have put that down to my rejection drugs, but my face does go very red & I feel like I am going to pass out. Not a nice feeling. I do miss sunbathing, but there are lots of things we have to give up once you have had a transplant.

 

I hope your friend keeps well & has to have no more treatment to remove skin cancer.

 

You have done lots of cruises, which has been your favourite. love your user name, have you ever seen the northern lights. It is on my to do list, we have done Norway twice, but it has been in the summer, land of the midnight sun. My favourite cruise has been Alaska, just so stunning.

 

:)

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Chez, I have seen the Northern Lights twice. Both from my back yard in southern Wisconsin where I grew up and we recently retired back here. The lights run in 12-13 year cycles so you might want to Google some of the web sites that are dedicatedto them. Several can tell you within an hour out as far as a week when they will peak. Right now we are 3 years into a new cycle and it wasn't a great main year in 2013. You have time to plan a late Fall trip to eastern northern Canada or Greenland for the best places to see them. They are awesome! We will be in a perfect place for vewing this year just about 2 months early but I am hoping. :).

 

My friend sees a dermatologist between every 6-12 months to get a full body screening so any skin cancer is caught when it is still at the surface levels only. He only sees the sun on vacations and really slathers on the sunscreen but he's on his second kidney and still going strong a good 40 years after his first. You might check the warnings and precautions for all your medications on rx.com to see if sun stroke or sun sensitivity applies to more than one. When we went through the Panama Canal my bottled water bill was more than double my bar tab for that cruise to stay hydrated and help cool down. I was out as we hit the Bridge of the Americas at 6:30 am and suddenly felt fuzzy headed at 8:15. I went in to take my temperature and it was 102°F (41C). The sun hadn't even burned off the morning fog yet and I needed to wrap an ice pack around my neck and splashed cold water over my face and arms. The temperature fell to normal quickly but yes, a red face s often a sign you are over heating. So drink plenty, use a good sunscreen and always wear a hat when the sun is hot as many especuially blond and redheads can get skin cancer on their scalp. Just never stop cruising!

Edited by NorthernLite

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Hi. We have been considering a cruise to Europe with my 2 adult sons both of whom have cognitive disabilities along with physical limitations. One has Down syndrome and we use a travel chair for him due to a heart condition and he is unable to walk any long distances. My other son has Autism. We do have a disability placard for our car that we could bring for my son with Down syndrome. We have National Park Access passes for both of them. Do you think these would suffice as far as proof of disability? Or are cognitive disabilities rated differently in Europe? It is pretty easy to tell that my son with Down syndrome is disabled just by looking at him, but my son with Autism is not so easy to see.

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Do you not have any letters confirming disability benefits that you get?

 

No, not really. Just a letter from years and years ago from New York State saying that they are approved for services through the Office of Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

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It may be worthwhile getting a letter from your doctor. I have never been asked for proof of disability but I have limited mobility which is obvious. However, I always take proof with me.

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I don't wish to sound rude or insensitive with this question, but I've been pondering it: What is the reasoning behind free admission for those with disabilities? I can understand making reasonable accommodation so that everyone can enjoy the sights equally, but I don't get free admission. I have to budget to see those things -- and some things I just can't fit into the budget.

 

I'm just trying to understand.

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Often people with disabilities don't have the earning power of able bodied people. I personally, had to leave a very well paid job because I couldn't manage to continue working.

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Often people with disabilities don't have the earning power of able bodied people. I personally, had to leave a very well paid job because I couldn't manage to continue working.

 

Agree. My younger son has a paying job for a whole 2 hours a week, and my older son has a paying job for 4 hours a week. It is very difficult for people with disabilities to get paid employment, at least where we live. If they do have a job, it is often part-time and minimum wage.

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I don't wish to sound rude or insensitive with this question, but I've been pondering it: What is the reasoning behind free admission for those with disabilities? I can understand making reasonable accommodation so that everyone can enjoy the sights equally, but I don't get free admission. I have to budget to see those things -- and some things I just can't fit into the budget.

 

I'm just trying to understand.

 

Hi,

 

Traditionally disabled people have mostly had poorly paid job or are only able to work part time. As it has been said most concessions for free entry is for the carer of the disabled person but some places do have free entry for both.

 

The question you asked is a reasonable question, I think that Londontowner has got the wrong end of the stick!

 

As to the question of proving that you are disabled to gain entry could be in violation of the European Convention on Human Rights as under this legislation you have a right to a private life, Italy are signatures in this legislation, unless Italy has proof of disability in its Equality legislation. (Just a bit of speculation on my part)

 

Pete

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Enforcer

 

I don't think I got the wrong end of the stick I got the impression that pkay finds it unfair that disabled people get concessions in museums. I like the signs over disabled parking bays in France which state 'if you want to take my space, take my disability too'.

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This is the post that lead me to ask this question.

 

https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowTopic-g187791-i22-k9199762-Rome_disability_blue_badge-Rome_Lazio.html

 

Unfortunately there are not many plus things to have a serious/life threatening illness, & yes it is very difficult to get a job if you are disabled in any way. Although I was in my previous job as a receptionist for 20 years, but had to give it up pre transplant as I went on full time oxygen. I have taken the decision not to go back to work as I want to enjoy my new life I have now. To make up for all the years I was too ill to even function on some days.

 

I was at my cystic fibrosis clinic yesterday & my specialist has never heard of the 76% or any other percentage gauge of how ill you are, obviously not a system used in the uk.

 

He has provided me a letter to say that being in the sun for over two hours is not recommended for me & also I am at risk of cancer, if I do. I had thyroid cancer last year caused by my rejection drugs, so if I do have any other pre cancerous cells they could be stimulated to become active & cause sink cancer, which obviously I want to avoid. I don't want to be that close to heaven for a 3rd time !!!!!!!!!

 

:):):)

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