Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
cavecreekguy

Why does everyone walk counter-clockwise on the promenade?

Recommended Posts

I've wondered about this so thought I'd ask.

 

Maybe "everyone" doesn't walk counter-clockwise, but it seems like most everyone does. Especially the morning power walkers.

 

I've never seen any signs on the deck telling people which direction to go, nor have I seen any other mention of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the weather is too bad to walk outside we walk at the mall. Everybody there goes counter clockwise too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They walk counter-clockwise because there are arrows posted telling you to do so. We walk at a fast pace and sometimes we would walk clockwise when there were other very slow walkers so they would sort of make room for us to pass. If we walked in the same direction as they did it was difficult to get past them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They walk counter-clockwise because there are arrows posted telling you to do so. We walk at a fast pace and sometimes we would walk clockwise when there were other very slow walkers so they would sort of make room for us to pass. If we walked in the same direction as they did it was difficult to get past them.

 

Hmm. When I noticed this phenomenon on the Maasdam and the Statendam last year I looked and didn't notice any signs. I must have missed them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've wondered about this so thought I'd ask.

 

Maybe "everyone" doesn't walk counter-clockwise, but it seems like most everyone does. Especially the morning power walkers.

 

I've never seen any signs on the deck telling people which direction to go, nor have I seen any other mention of it.

 

South of the equator everyone walks clock-wise. :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may relate to the maritime tradition with regards to passageway and ladder direction onboard a ship.

Edited by Heartgrove

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmm. When I noticed this phenomenon on the Maasdam and the Statendam last year I looked and didn't notice any signs. I must have missed them.

On the Amsterdam the sign with the arrows and message to walk that way are posted on the aft and stern of the ship. Perhaps you weren't observant enough to notice them or your ship lacked them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It may relate to the maritime tradition with regards to passageway and ladder direction onboard a ship.

 

But that wouldn't explain why pretty much everyone was doing it. I wouldn't think they were all so well-versed in maritime tradition.

 

On the Amsterdam the sign with the arrows and message to walk that way are posted on the aft and stern of the ship. Perhaps you weren't observant enough to notice them or your ship lacked them.

 

Either or both are certainly possibilities! I will make a very close inspection next month on the Oosterdam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never really thought about it. But I have noticed that's the way most people walk. A track I used to walk at did counter-clockwise M, W, F, & S and clockwise T, T, & S. I thought that was a great way to do it.

 

But while we're discussing walking, I am going to mention my biggest peeve about it -- people walking two or three abreast and blocking the way when people come up behind them walking faster than they are. SINGLE FILE PEOPLE!!! Especially in the tight areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stepped out on deck one morning on Veendam, and I strolled aft toward some deck chairs that were not reserved. A woman who was walking counterclockwise scolded me for walking the wrong way. :eek: She was the only one out there power-walking, and I wasn't in her way, but she needed to tell me what I was SUPPOSED to do.

Edited by 3rdGenCunarder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a fast walker and I just give a "passing on your right(or left)" and people have no problem moving over. I always thank them as I pass

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But that wouldn't explain why pretty much everyone was doing it. I wouldn't think they were all so well-versed in maritime tradition.

 

 

 

 

I was referring to where it may have originated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to recall seeing signs and/or arrows on more than one ship suggesting that pattern. In the Navy it is standard when going to General Quarters (when time is essential) the standard rule is moving forward and to upper decks on starboard and aft and to lower decks on port: having everyone following the same flow pattern expedites the process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the USA auto races and track and field meets are run counter clockwise. Some ships have the arrows and some don't

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the USA auto races and track and field meets are run counter clockwise. Some ships have the arrows and some don't

There are many US auto races tracks that run clockwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...but have you ever been doing laps when the ship crosses the equator and everyone reverses direction!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My DH says it's because you should walk with your heart on the inside (shorter?) side!:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I seem to recall seeing signs and/or arrows on more than one ship suggesting that pattern. In the Navy it is standard when going to General Quarters (when time is essential) the standard rule is moving forward and to upper decks on starboard and aft and to lower decks on port: having everyone following the same flow pattern expedites the process.

 

I still remember it..."Up the starboard, Down the port" :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A common thread and reason...."Just about every circular sport runs counterclockwise-horse racing, NASCAR, baseball. Why? Who knows? Though most believe it was probably an arbitrary decision and tradition that started with the chariot races at Rome's Circus Maximus stadium in the sixth century BC, experts in biomechanics think there also may be some coincidental physiological benefits. Most people are right-leg dominant, so they use their left leg more for support. When running counterclockwise, you'll take longer strides with your right leg-which allows for more propulsion and speed on the turns."

 

Bottom line on the HAL ships....from those of us who walk the Promenade....PLEASE do as the signs say.....walk counter clock wise!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't seen the signs on a ship in awhile but I do remember them at some point. I really wish that everyone would do this. I like to get my excercise walking the deck and the people walking in the opposite direction seem to cause a hiccup in the flow. I usually pass everyone but I also keep my eyes and ears open for those who wish to pass. Those walking 2-3 abreast with no awareness of their surroundings can make things difficult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • 2019 Cruisers' Choice Awards
      • Celebrity Edge in Europe Sweepstakes
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Community Contests
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...