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Where are the Nikon Enthusiasts??


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I have not seen many posts about Nikon cameras. I recently decided to take up photography for something to do and for better pictures than what I see on my iPhone. I call myself a professional amateur.. lol..

 

Prior to purchasing, I did some research on Nikon vs Cannon. Decided on Nikon for no real reason aside from I got a good deal on a D5300 floor model bundle at Sam's. The camera body and two lens (18-50 and 50-200) was $697. The D5300 is a nice camera but lacked some performance so I purchased the D7100. I also purchased a 50mm lens. I went back and forth between the 35mm and 50mm.

 

I'm sailing on RC Allure soon. In the past, I have taken pictures but with a point and shoot camera. I am excited about getting some better pictures this time with my Nikon cameras. I believe on RC the photographers use Nikon cameras but honestly I think the pictures are not that great. There is usual very little (if any) composition and some pictures have too many people in the background, absolutely no Bokeh. I know there isn't a lot of time to compose great pictures but for $20 a picture I just expect a little a more basic photography.

 

Anyway, I would love to hear some tips from other who have taken some great cruise shots.

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?

 

Feel free to share any type of information as well as pictures. I'm just looking to start a discussion from Nikon users.

 

 

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I am not a Nikon user, but here goes...

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

I used to take my Sony A55 with me on every cruise, but got tired of lugging that around. I got a Sony HX80 with a 30X zoom lens, and it takes great pictures that blow away any phone camera. Are they as good as a great DSLR with a wonderful lens? Not likely, but compared to the phone they are much better

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

Either sunrise or sunset. That is what brings out the reddish color and things are lit from the side which looks much better

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?
Since I use auto all the time, I do not know

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.
Define 'clear'? If they are not in focus that is one thing. But if the color is off, that is caused by the differing types of light present on a ship. In one area they might have Incandescent, fluorescent, and LED lights in a single room. It is easy for your eye to adjust, but difficult for a camera to do so.

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?
I usually turn it off. I know the amount of light that I will have, so I set it to whatever the 'film' I would use.

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?
I used to use the external flash with the Sony DSLR, but the PS does not have it, so I am stuck with the built in. But in most cases for indoor, that does not matter.

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?
I find the most interesting pictures can be found in the areas a little away from the ship. Just open your eyes and look for interesting things. Road signs are always kind of cool (to me), and interesting buildings are also cool.
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The brand of camera you prefer is of little importance. The technique you use will apply to any camera. Great photos are captured every day with a wide variety of equipment.

Many internet sites can begin to add to your technique. Try searching for basics of good exposure, or photo tips to get started. Practice before leaving on your cruise at home to become familiar with your equipment.

First tip that I might offer - manually set your ISO to its lowest setting, and avoid the auto mode. Aperture priority may work best if your subject is not moving.

Best wishes on your cruise!😊

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I'm a Nikon and Sony enthusiast.... Let me try to answer your questions.... See below

 

 

Anyway, I would love to hear some tips from other who have taken some great cruise shots.

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

 

Last cruise, I had 2 camera bags packed with about 20 lbs of gear.... They included my Nikon D750, a speedlight flash, 18-35 lens, 45/1.8 lens, 85/1.8 lens. Then I had the Sony A6300 with 10-18 lens, 24/1.8, 35/1.8 and 70-200, plus a gorilla pod tripod. That's going a bit on the extensive side, but to me, the cruising essentials are:

Camera body

Speed light flash if you are going to do any indoor portrait type shooting especially

Ultrawide zoom lens if you like landscapes.

Typically a regular length zoom, 18-55 in your case, but I skipped such a lens on my last trip.

At least one prime low light lens, in your case, a 35/1.8.

Personally, I don't need a telephoto lens on cruises, though some people take telephoto everywhere.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

 

No question, golden hour. From about 15 minutes before sunrise to 45 minutes after sunrise. And from about 45 minutes before sunset, till a bit after sunset. As in this example

 

29497054705_5daff3657c_b.jpgDisney Fantasy at sunset by Adam Brown, on Flickr

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

 

Can't answer. It depends on how much available light yuo have. Depends on whether you are trying to create bokeh and background blur, or if you want everything perceived sharp. You want to keep ISO as low as possible. Shutter speed fast enough to prevent motion blur. And use the aperture to control the depth of field.

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

 

Same as above.... and using a speedlight flash, but bouncing it off of white surfaces

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

 

Good, as long as you keep an eye on it.

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?

 

Yes, but bounced

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?

 

Feel free to share any type of information as well as pictures. I'm just looking to start a discussion from Nikon users.

 

 

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After 39 cruises and 45 years of photography, I may have some good answers.

 

Unfortunately, I shoot with Sony cameras.

 

Sorry.

 

Dave

 

Maybe that was a bit snarky. I have been shooting Minolta and then Sony since I was about fifteen and have had many a brand "enthusiast" explain to me that I would never be a "real" photographer unless I stepped up and got a "real" camera.

 

Since your camera has a Sony sensor and you made the choice for financial reasons, I'll assume you aren't one of "Those" people and really just want some advice on what others carry and some basic tips. :)

 

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

 

I used to carry a couple of Sony DSLRs and an assortment of lenses in a Pelican case plus a backpack but have since moved to the e-mount APS-C A6300 and A6000 cameras. The reduction in size and weight without compromising image quality seemed like a good idea and it was. Now, I carry one medium under-the-seat backpack that includes two cameras with lenses attached (18-105 f/4 & 12mm f/2), three or four additional lenses (8mm f/2.8 fisheye, Lensbaby with Sweet35 optic, 55-210 zoom and 50mm f/1.8), sensor cleaning equipment, batteries, a monopod, mini-tripod, chargers and a laptop or tablet. I could get by with the 18-105, 12mm and 55-210 if I had to but the others aren't very big and let me have fun walking around the ship looking for interesting compositions.

 

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

 

Havoc has it right in his post above. The Golden hour is best and I personally prefer the morning for ship pictures because of the lack of people.

 

Since you aren't usually in port during those hours, just make the best of it and don't forget your lens hood.

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

 

Aperture priority. Usually at f/5.6 or f/8. I use A-mode for control over depth of field and let the camera decide the shutter speed.

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

 

Aperture mode. Usually close to or actually wide open.

 

White balance is handled much better in more advanced cameras but variations in fluorescents and tungsten or LED lights can fool the best of them. I usually settle for the "close enough" provided by the Auto W/B and tweak it in Lightroom as needed. You could also get familiar with manual W/B settings but I guarantee you will forget and leave it on Tungsten all day at least once.

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

 

Auto ISO, set to bump up when shutter speed drops below 1/30 for scenery or 1/125 when people are involved. I have it limited to ISO6400 on the A6300 and ISO3200 on the A6000 but will go higher if needed.

 

If you can't limit the top-end (most have a reasonable limit by default) or where it makes the jump to the next level, avoid it indoors

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?

 

Nope. Carried one for 20 cruises and used it maybe once or twice. Advances in high-ISO sensors have reduced the need for the type of shooting I do on trips.

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?

 

 

Maho Beach in St. Maarten is my favorite but most islands are teeming with photo ops. Sightseeing tours that specifically mention photo stops are usually good samplers the first time on an island. Check the ports-of-call boards for suggestions and Dept. of State for crime and unrest warnings (Jamaica, mon).

 

 

Here are links to our two trips on the Allure. Awesome ship and a floating photo-op in itself:

 

http://galleries.pptphoto.com/allure2016

 

http://galleries.pptphoto.com/allure

 

Recent trip to Pacific Coast with a lot of non-standard ship photos (been on it before). Some "odd" perspectives of San Francisco as well:

 

http://galleries.pptphoto.com/paccoast2016

 

If this is your first trip with a DSLR, carry as much as you can and time will tell you what you need to carry in the future. It's hard to say for sure what you should take since everybody's style is different.

 

Whatever you do, take a whole bunch of photos and have a great time. The Allure is an awesome ship!

 

Happy Shooting!

 

Dave

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I have not seen many posts about Nikon cameras. I recently decided to take up photography for something to do and for better pictures than what I see on my iPhone. I call myself a professional amateur.. lol..

 

Prior to purchasing, I did some research on Nikon vs Cannon. Decided on Nikon for no real reason aside from I got a good deal on a D5300 floor model bundle at Sam's. The camera body and two lens (18-50 and 50-200) was $697. The D5300 is a nice camera but lacked some performance so I purchased the D7100. I also purchased a 50mm lens. I went back and forth between the 35mm and 50mm.

 

I'm sailing on RC Allure soon. In the past, I have taken pictures but with a point and shoot camera. I am excited about getting some better pictures this time with my Nikon cameras. I believe on RC the photographers use Nikon cameras but honestly I think the pictures are not that great. There is usual very little (if any) composition and some pictures have too many people in the background, absolutely no Bokeh. I know there isn't a lot of time to compose great pictures but for $20 a picture I just expect a little a more basic photography.

 

Anyway, I would love to hear some tips from other who have taken some great cruise shots.

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?

 

Feel free to share any type of information as well as pictures. I'm just looking to start a discussion from Nikon users.

 

 

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1) Nikon D610, 24-120 f4, 50 f1.8, 70-300 f4.5-5.6. CPL, red filter, 10 stop ND (don't use it much without a tripod but too lazy to take it out of the case).

 

2) Any time from about 12:01 am till 11:59 pm. (those two minutes in-between are really bad. :p) But seriously, when on a cruise you don't really have much choice in when you shoot (assuming excursions) so just make the best of it. (B&W can be your friend when the sun is high in the sky)

 

3)ISO lowest possible, Shuttter and app--whatever is needed to get the shot I desire.

 

4) shoot RAW and white balance setting is a non issue. just set it on the computer. Define "not clear".. if blurry then you need a faster shutter speed. Get out of "auto" and use Manual and get the settings you want. (it's not hard)

 

5) nothing wrong with auto ISO. I use it quite often. (my camera handles high iso really well so I don't worry about it). If you have time to set up everything and can plan your shot the lowest iso is always best. (if shooting for a pano or HDR you don't want to be in auto iso, you want it set to allow for proper blending/merging)

 

6) haven't used a flash since my point and shoot days. I mostly do landscape type shots not people so no real need for a flash.

 

7) Caribbean is a pretty big place. hard to answer.

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I've worked as a photographer on and off for about 40 years now.

 

Personally in 35 mm I'm a canon man, in medium format it's Hasselblad.

 

But over the years I've worked for various people that want (need) me to use their gear (moreso since the advent of digital). I think I've used it all.

 

I've also sold cameras.

 

There is very little difference between the major brands, sure the zoom might go in the opposite direction or the nobs might be arranged differently and that can be a real pain, at one time I was shooting for a few different organisations that all wanted me using different gear...

 

Ricoh (postcards and callanders)

Nikon (weddings)

'blads (Corporate portraits and modelling)

Mamiya TLR (family portraits)

My own Canon (a few things including restaurants and nightclubs)

 

Frankly it didn't matter.

 

In the days of film it was the lens that really mattered, now it's the lens and the sensor (many of which come out of the same factory anyway).

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I have not seen many posts about Nikon cameras. I recently decided to take up photography for something to do and for better pictures than what I see on my iPhone. I call myself a professional amateur. Prior to purchasing, I did some research on Nikon vs Cannon. Decided on Nikon for no real reason aside from I got a good deal on a D5300 floor model. The D5300 is a nice camera but lacked some performance so I purchased the D7100. I'm sailing on RC Allure soon. I am excited about getting some better pictures this time with my Nikon cameras. I believe on RC the photographers use Nikon cameras but honestly I think the pictures are not that great. I would love to hear some tips from other who have taken some great cruise shots. Feel free to share any type of information as well as pictures. I'm just looking to start a discussion from Nikon users.

 

Appreciate this great initial post and the excellent follow-ups and insightful comments. Although I have been a dedicated and happy Nikon owner since the 1960's, there is so much honest truth about how things have narrowed and improved among the top, major brands. There are "differences", but does it matter as much compared with some other key factors in achieving your goal of getting better visuals for your travels?

 

Just like with an artist or cook, it is not always the quality of the paint brushes . . . or . . . pots and pans that make THE significant difference. It's more about the skill, attention to detail and interest of the camera user. Your questions?

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on.

I had upgraded from a Nikon D3100 to a Nikon D7100 with an 18-140mm VR lens for our early 2014 Australia-NZ adventure. Recently, after that D7100 got some water damage while at Victoria Falls, I now have a D7200. Glad I had the camera equipment insured!! Also, I have a Nikon 55-300mm VR lenses for longer shots and a 10-20mm Sigma wide angle that is great for churches and building interiors, etc. Recently, I got a Nikkor 35mm f1.8 for lower light and other such needs/specialities, including food porn and evening shows. In my situations during most travels, it is just it is just in the camera case with the D7200 and its main 18-140mm lens, plus the wide-angle and maybe the 55-300mm when I think I will need it for longer shots.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

Ideally, it's early morning and later afternoon. Mid-day is not the best. Sorry! Avoiding that high sun creates more lighting drama and interest. See one of my pictures below of the hippo in South Africa with the lower sun angle late in the afternoon. But on many cruises (they are vacations, after all), we might not be flexible to do such early morning and later afternoon shots given the ships schedules and the needed lighting angles. See also a good early morning example for how the lighting helped the picture.

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

In most cases, including for indoors, I shoot in the program setting, letting the camera do the work on settings and focus so that I can be more concerned on framing, subject and creative options. These cameras can be “complicated”, but I try to avoid too many of those challenges and distractions.

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

I mostly have my ISO at 800. That gives good flexibility and quick responses for both interior and exterior shots. Will make some adjustments lower or higher with the ISO setting, depending on what I am doing and where. When I change my ISO, it is sometimes hard to remember to change it back!! Sorry, that's my reality. Like to keep things "simple" to be able to focus on the subject "opportunities"!!

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?

Mostly I shoot either available light or use the built-in flash on the top for fill, etc.

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?

It depends on the island/location where visiting. From doing the Amazon River and ten Caribbean islands early last year, the variety in this region is very, very different. Hard to generalize!! Where is your upcoming cruise stopping? What are your personal likes and interests, best travel loves, etc.??

 

Tell us more! Look forward to hearing your feed-back and added questions.

 

THANKS! Enjoy! Terry in Ohio

 

Enjoyed a 14-day, Jan. 20-Feb. 3, 2014, Sydney to Auckland adventure, getting a big sampling for the wonders of "down under” before and after this cruise. Go to:

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1974139

for more info and many pictures of these amazing sights in this great part of the world. Now at 157,013 views for this posting.

 

 

Here is a picture from our New Zealand South Island JetBoat ride that my wife loved so much. From Akaroa, we did a combination ship excursion that included both the rail trip to the mountains/National Park, plus JetBoat. Notice her hands and those of others in our row super tightly gripping the safety bar? That says so much about the speed and thrills while roaring up and down this amazing stretch of scenic river. We've had lots of great moments on this trip, but one was a unique and special ride in a location that is spectacularly world-class near the NZ Southern Alps. And, perfect weather with good friends adds to the great joy!! This visual was shot at 10mm, 1/500 of a second, f9.0, ISO 800.:

 

JetBoatOne1_zpscafe58a3.jpg

 

 

While at Cape Kidnappers near Napier, NZ, we arranged a private, three-course, gourmet lunch at the exclusive resort here that overlooked both the Pacific Ocean and the famed golf course ranked as the 22nd best in the world. Here are members of our 14-person, Central Ohio group enjoying this scenic and dramatic setting and the beautiful weather this day. I used my 10-20mm wide-angle lens to capture this shot/angle. It was at 13mm, f/8, 1/250 of a second, ISO 800:

 

NapCapKidGannets115_zps0061777a.jpg

 

 

This is Old St. Paul's church in Wellington. It is the former cathedral in the Diocese of Wellington for the Anglican Church. As an example of 19th-century Gothic Revival architecture, they adapted to colonial conditions and materials. It is at 34 Mulgrave Street, close to the New Zealand Parliament. Its construction was completed in June 1866. After a significant battle to prevent its demolition, Old St. Paul's was purchased by the New Zealand Government in 1967 and restored. Although not a parish church, it remains consecrated and is a popular for weddings, funerals and other services. It is constructed from native NZ timbers. The interior has been likened to the upturned hull of an Elizabethan galleon with its exposed curving trusses and roof sacking. The flags displayed in the nave include the Royal Navy, NZ Merchant Navy and US Marine Corps. Many of our Marines were stationed in Wellington during World War II. My wife is in yellow walking down the center aisle as she absorb the building details. This was a very important and "moving" site to experience. This visual was shot at 10mm, 1/6 of a second, f4.0, ISO 800. This was hand-held leaning against a solid surface. Do some of these visuals prove the value for a good wide-angle lens?:

 

WellingtonA9_zpse247f172.jpg

 

 

While stopped at Santarem along the amazing Amazon River, we had our charter/private boat arranged in advance. We headed into the back-water Amazon regions in search of nature, wildlife, unique scenery, etc. Our boat was fairly small, but with a powerful engine and covered to shade us from the harsh sun. Our skilled Amazon guide Gil Serique was on the look-out for birds, unique views and nature action. Our driver got us through very shallow and challenging areas. We saw lots of special birds, unique animals, flowers, giant water lilies, etc., during this adventure exploration. This was taken with the wide-angle at 14mm, f/14, 1/320 of a second, ISO 800:

 

FebAmazPixA14%201_zpswzwufcpx.jpg

 

 

From Hluhluwe–iMfolozi Game Reserve near Richards Bay, South Africa, during our two-day, overnight adventure at this location, here is a wind-blown example of a male Kudu right after sunrise. This was taken with the longer zoom at 210mm, f/18, 1/320 of a second, ISO 800.:

 

Africa2016PixsC14_zpspqexjnaz.jpg

 

 

From South Africa's iSimangaliso Wetland Park near Richards Bay during our two-day, overnight adventure off of the cruise ship, we saw lots of hippos!! It was late in the afternoon, providing perfect light, as we sailed on a waterway near St. Lucia. Here is one example below for these fast and deadly hippos. They kill the most of all creatures in Africa. More to worry about hippos than lions, etc. This park is home to about 1,200 Nile Crocodiles and almost 800 Hippopotami per Wikipedia, plus lots of birds, etc. This image was captured with my longer zoom at 300mm, f/11, 1/800 of a second, ISO 800.:

 

Africa2016PixsC12%201_zps6mbm1gni.jpg

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I would support most of what Terry says, save I "normally" shoot at 200 ISO, not his 800, I bump it when I need to, one of the beauties of digital not needing extra bodies for different film speeds.

 

And

 

Whilst I prefer natural light if I use flash I want an external flash, preferably off camera.

 

Gear

 

I am a Canon man

 

5dII (would love to upgrade to the IV not sure I can justify it)

 

M (Canon mirrorless that is ready for an upgrade I think)

 

G1X (compact goes pretty much everywhere I do)

 

Then some flash gear, Normalky 1 or 2 580EX and 270 EX.

 

THEN GLASS

 

That varies

 

Certain to take my 28-135IS (not a new lens but in my opinion superior to the 24-105 for everyday use) 75-300 IS, Nifty 50 1.4.

 

Then whatever the location might call for. I'm also lucky that a good friend is one of Australia's real up and coming photographers also shoots Canon and shoots most of their ads so I can usually manage to get my hands on anything else I need short term.

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  • I have a few Nikon bodies. I also have
    and Sony pocket shooters.
  • On vacation I grab the trusty D300 and remove the Vgrip to be more compact when travelling. 18-300mm or 18-200mm takes less space than the dual kit lenses I see with other travelers. I also strip the flash bracket. With aircraft weight surcharges, can't be packing like
    .
  • Ideal time for images would be sunset/sunrise... but not all port times allow for this. I don't want to miss the boat.
  • Shutter/Aperture/ISO depends on what I shooting. Fast wildlife means automatic mode. Love Nikon's Auto-ISO features when chasing animals. When a Juneau whale pops up.... you don't have time say "pose, pose, sexy pic, sexy pic, etc" as you push the shutter.
  • Love Auto-ISO when I don't have time to make adjustments on the fly.
  • Love my SB-5000 to correct white balance issues indoors.

 

Welcome home....

 

[YOUTUBE]DVQiN568izQ[/YOUTUBE]

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Many good suggestions here. I have a D7100 with several lenses. Depending on what you are shooting the right lens can make a big difference. If shooting sunsets and shots around water use a good polarizing filter. Cuts out glare and adds a nice effect to your shots. On cruises I always do late seating for dinner so that I can go out on deck and take pictures of sunsets and around the outside decks. The decks are usually empty at that time and I usually get nice shots without the people around. I also get up at sunset to take pictures. Nobody around and lighting is good for interesting shots. I always use manual settings trying to keep the iso as low as possible. If taking sunsets use a tripod. Have fun and good luck! By the way a novice photographer takes pictures on vacation. A serious photographer goes on vacation to take pictures!

 

 

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I, like many here have used many different brands in my life. I mostly used Canon and Olympus in the film days. When the digital age came I was an avid Sony user, my last being an A100. I then switched to Nikon and have been very happy.

 

My basic advice is to read up on composition and practice. Digital film is free. A well composed photograph taken with a point and shoot is often much better than a snap shot taken with the best DSLR. (I need to follow my own advice sometimes)

 

I currently alternate between a D-7200(DX) and a D-810(FX).

 

My DX lens of choices for cruising are the:

 

Nikkor 18-140mm f3.5-5.6, kit lens for a general walk around lens.

 

If I feel I need more control over my Depth of Field I use a Nikkor 35mm f1.8G.

 

My FX kit is more extensive mainly because I can use those lenses on both camera bodies.

 

(Keep in mind the 1.5X crop factor for both focal length and aperture using an FX lens on a DX body)

 

My walk around lens alternates between a Tamron SP 24-70mm f2.8 and a Nikkor 85mm f1.8d.

 

If I feel I need more focal length (Alaska maybe) I will take a Tamron 28-300mm f 3.5-6.3. or a Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3.

 

 

 

 

I would love to hear some tips from other who have taken some great cruise shots.

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

 

I use a Pelican 1510 with a Trek-Pak and lid organizer. Has rollers and a handle and fits in most Airline overheads.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

 

As the Sun rises or Sets

 

p><p><img src= by , on Flickr[/img]

 

<!--url{6}--><a href=DSC_0201 by Mark Davis, on Flickr[/img]

 

 

Research and Practice[/color]

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash? No

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos? The answer is in the question my friend. Just get off the ship and start looking. Life is going on all around you. Photography is all about capturing your idea of Unique

 

My final advice: Push down the shutter button until you think you took too many frames....Take a deep breath....Push that button again. You can delete them all if you want to but, I bet there will be a few that you really like.

 

Shoot in RAW and learn to post process

 

Feel free to share any type of information as well as pictures. I'm just looking to start a discussion from Nikon users.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

 

Mark

 

 

All the photos posted here were taken with the D-7200 and 18-140mm kit lens

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..Shoot in RAW and learn to post process

 

To the OP:

 

Or shoot JPEG and learn to post-process. With software like Lightroom, RAW is still needed for some situations but with in-camera processing at its current level of sophistication, it just isn't as important as it once was.

 

Shoot RAW or JPEG but don't feel you need to only shoot RAW if you want great photos. Another mistake would be to think that RAW is no longer needed. Both have their place but do some reading before you make up your mind which is best for you.

 

I wrote an article about the pros and cons of each here:

http://www.pptphoto.com/articles/rawvsjpeg.html

 

Dave

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1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

Depends on the cruise destination. For us, it's frequently Alaska from Seattle, so we can drive there and take as much gear as we want. For me, that's three cameras, four "outdoor" lenses, 3-5 indoor lenses, 1-2 lights, a tripod, and a monopod.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

Somewhere between midnight last night and midnight tonight. Go shoot something already! Golden hour is great, but it can also be nice to have lots of light to give plenty of options for how your shot comes together.

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

ISO 100, aperture wide open minus one stop, shutter controlled by the camera. If the shutter is going to get too slow for handholdability, raise the ISO. Handholdability rule of thumb is 1/effective focal length for non-IS lenses, or [8 to 16]/EFL for IS lenses depending on how new the lens design is. Sometimes, stop-action requires a higher ISO regardless of handholdability. Seriously though, if you think there's one answer to this question, you have a LOT to learn.

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

Indoor shots with flash often have the "snapshot effect" because the white balance of the lights in the room (incandescent, 2600-3200K, or fluorescent, 3800-4400K with a notable green shift) don't match the flash (5600K, which is very close to daylight). The fix is to gel the flash with CTO/CTS colored gels when the room is lit with incandescent, or 1/2CTO or 1/2CTS gels plus 1/2 "plusgreen" or 1/4 "plusgreen" when the room is lit with fluorescent, and then set the WB to incandescent/tungsten or fluorescent as appropriate. Check out the "Strobist Gel Pack" for a great way to get started.

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

Bad IMHO. Huge potential impact to the noise quality of every image, huge potential shrinkage to your apparent buffer size. Better in my opinion to just let shutter speed be automated (once it's fast enough, anything faster won't really change the artistic nature of your shot) and you control the aperture (direct impact on depth of field and clarity in the corners) and ISO (direct impact on noise).

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?

Absolutely depends on what I'm shooting. Outdoors, probably not. Indoors, probably a Profoto B2 with a modifier appropriate for the subject in front of my lens. If human, either a 2' Octabox or a 1'x3' Stripbox. If food, perhaps a 15"x15" softbox.

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1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens.

If flying you are allowed 1 carry on and one personal item(camera bag). For years and most recently to Santa Fe I have traveled with a small Travel Pro carry on roller and camera bag that fits under the seat. For the last several trips i have used a Think Tank Retrospective 7 with two lens changer 35 V2.0 attached on each side (which later can be clipped to a belt or put in a backpack). In this I have; D810 attached to Nikon 24-70/f2.8 VR, Nikon 70-200/f2.8vr, Nikon 17-55/f2.8, Nikon 28-300/F5.6 and Tamron 15-30/f.2.8 and D7200 with grip attached, cable management 10 v2.0 with cables, etc. GoPro, Pixel Pocket SD case, iPad, all lens have Nikon polarizers attached except the Tamron which cannot take filters. It is very heavy but rides on top of the roller and fits under the seat and still leave room for our feet.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

Morning and evening, but if on tour you have to go with what you have, just shoot the sun at you back or at 90 degrees.

 

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

Outdoor landscapes 200 short lens 800 long (D810) always in Aperture Priority mode I love playing with the depth of field. But to get the sharpest with all in focus f8 or less but a flower with the back ground out of focus 2.8

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

I use the D810 and 1500-3200

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

Depends on the camera and the amount of pixels. the D810 I have gone as high as 9000. D7200 highest 3200.

30009546512_80d576d88f_k.jpg

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash? Did but use it less with higher ISO allowed by D810.

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?

Anywhere.

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I have not seen many posts about Nikon cameras. I recently decided to take up photography for something to do and for better pictures than

what I see on my iPhone. I call myself a professional amateur.. lol..

 

Prior to purchasing, I did some research on Nikon vs Cannon. Decided on Nikon for no real reason aside from I got a good deal on a D5300 floor model bundle at Sam's.

The camera body and two lens (18-50 and 50-200) was $697. The D5300 is a nice camera but lacked some performance so I purchased the D7100. I also purchased

a 50mm lens. I went back and forth between the 35mm and 50mm.

 

I'm sailing on RC Allure soon. In the past, I have taken pictures but with a point and shoot camera. I am excited about getting some better pictures this time with my

Nikon cameras. I believe on RC the photographers use Nikon cameras but honestly I think the pictures are not that great. There is usual very little (if any) composition

and some pictures have too many people in the background, absolutely no Bokeh. I know there isn't a lot of time to compose great pictures but for $20 a picture I just

expect a little a more basic photography.

 

Anyway, I would love to hear some tips from other who have taken some great cruise shots.

 

1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a

camera bag and a few lens.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures?

 

3) What shutter speed / ISO/ Aperture are you using outdoor?

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue.

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad?

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash?

 

7) Where do you go off the ship in the Caribbean for unique photos?

 

Feel free to share any type of information as well as pictures. I'm just looking to start a discussion from Nikon users.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

 

 

Trying to learn specific's from this thread is not practical. Find a local junior collage near you and take a couple of photo courses to get yourself

familiar with the field. It really takes years to understand why you do one thing over another.

 

After you get the basics you then practice to get better just like learning to play music. For some of us this becomes a lifestyle or a profession.

Your only limits is what you can create. Rules that you learn may be bent as you get further into the learning process.

 

Good luck with your pursuit of photography, keep it fun and enjoy.

 

framer

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello all, Thank you.., I know it seems like I abandoned my own thread but I did not. I had some unexpected personal issues that came up and have not been using the computer. Things are on the upswing now. Thankfully things are on the upswing!!

 

Thank you all for taking the time to answer my questions and share your knowledge. The responses have been very informative and a good benchmark. Looks like I have to get up early to take sunrise pictures. Not much of a morning person but I have to get up..

 

Thank you also for sharing the awesome pictures!! Great artistic vision!!!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

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1) What camera and equipment do you take and what do you actually use? Camera equipment is heavy for sure. There isn't much room left in a carry on after a camera bag and a few lens. Forums

 

Nikon p900. I don't want to deal with changing lenses on my DSLR while I am enjoying my cruise and this camera is amazing.

 

2) What is the best time of day for outdoor pictures? Forums

 

easy; the Golden Hour!

 

4) What settings are you using indoors? My pictures in "Auto" mode with the point and shoot were never clear. The color is always off. I assume this is a white balance issue. Forums

 

I will use Auto but I play around. I look at the indoor/party settings also. But I can always correct anything in the editing process afterwards.

 

5) Auto ISO setting good or bad? Forums

 

Good especially if you can edit afterwards to make it better.

 

6 ) Are you using an external flash? Forums

 

Nope, never

 

Forums

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About not seeing many Nikon threads, I have not seen a Nikon on my last 4 cruises. No one seems to be carrying DSLR's any more. My wife and I used to each carry a DSLR, but iPhone cameras are so good.

To each their own, but there's no way that I'd be comfortable with an iPhone as a substitute for my DSLRs.

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Addressing the initial question posed in this thread: I am a Nikon shooter. It not that I think Nikon is a better camera or system than Canon, Sony or any other. Actually, I think that similarly priced cameras, lenses, etc. from each of the manufacturers will yield very similar results under similar circumstances. I am a Nikon shooter because I always have been. 35 years ago or so, I purchased my first Nikon SLR (an FE2), and have since purchased many, many cameras, lenses, flashes and other Nikon accessories. I could not switch brands now without spending lots of money.

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Addressing the initial question posed in this thread: I am a Nikon shooter. It not that I think Nikon is a better camera or system than Canon, Sony or any other. Actually, I think that similarly priced cameras, lenses, etc. from each of the manufacturers will yield very similar results under similar circumstances. I am a Nikon shooter because I always have been. 35 years ago or so, I purchased my first Nikon SLR (an FE2), and have since purchased many, many cameras, lenses, flashes and other Nikon accessories. I could not switch brands now without spending lots of money.

 

Like Dan, I am a Nikon shooter and have been for more than 40 years. However, I have had affairs with many other cameras, including my first serious camera, a Leica look-alike Canon S4 35 mm I picked up at a PX in Korea in 1954. Others followed including a Konica, Rollei 35, Welta, Zeiss Ikonta B, two Rolleiflexes, then SLRs, starting with Mirandas, continuing on to Nikkormats, a meterless Nikon F and finally Nikons F4, 100, 100, 300 and 7200. No way could I afford to -- or want to --switch now.

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To each their own, but there's no way that I'd be comfortable with an iPhone as a substitute for my DSLRs.

 

 

I agree with this. I have an iPhone (for now) and it in no way can compare with my D610 for low light shots or DOF stuff. My last 2 sailings (Alaska and the Med) there were lots and lots of people with DSLR's (along with many folks with tablets for cameras :eek: ). I want the best quality I can get and a phone camera just can't cut it when matched against my big camera.

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  • 1 month later...

Sure, the cameras in the iPhone have gotten better. I just bought the iPhone 7 and it’s amazing.

 

However, as convenient and as “good” as the iPhone has become for photos, you still can’t see the LCD screen if out in bright sunlight. Plus you lose the ability to control for depth of field and shutter speed.

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