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mommykim

I just ordered my first DSLR camera!

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11 hours ago, cruises42 said:

Do you think P mode would be good to use for Alaska scenery? Also any hints about taking photos through glass?

 

Considering your camera has a thousand times more power than the computer that sent men to the moon and is programmed with 100 years of photographic knowledge and experience, I would feel no shame in trusting it to do a good job, The only caveat is that if you are shooting a scene with a lot of snow (glacier walk or something) increase your exposure by +1 using the exposure compensation. Metering averages a scene but the large expanse of bright snow will fool it into reducing exposure, making the snow look greyish and dull.

 

Glass. Wear dark clothes to minimize reflections. If it is truly glass, a polarizer can help eliminate much of the reflections. If it is tinted (usually a plastic film) or lexan like is used in most aircraft and many boats, a polarizer will cause odd patchiness and random rainbow colors since the plastic is also polarizing the light. A screw-on rubber hood pressed against the window can help block reflections from behind you. If you are shooting through glass into the sun...let's just say it's hit or miss at best.

 

Dave

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Shooting thru glass - try not to. Put on your heavy clothes and be on the deck. There are even gloves designed for photographers.

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12 hours ago, pierces said:

 

Considering your camera has a thousand times more power than the computer that sent men to the moon and is programmed with 100 years of photographic knowledge and experience, I would feel no shame in trusting it to do a good job, The only caveat is that if you are shooting a scene with a lot of snow (glacier walk or something) increase your exposure by +1 using the exposure compensation. Metering averages a scene but the large expanse of bright snow will fool it into reducing exposure, making the snow look greyish and dull.

 

Glass. Wear dark clothes to minimize reflections. If it is truly glass, a polarizer can help eliminate much of the reflections. If it is tinted (usually a plastic film) or lexan like is used in most aircraft and many boats, a polarizer will cause odd patchiness and random rainbow colors since the plastic is also polarizing the light. A screw-on rubber hood pressed against the window can help block reflections from behind you. If you are shooting through glass into the sun...let's just say it's hit or miss at best.

 

Dave

Thank you!

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3 hours ago, Ozzydog said:

Shooting thru glass - try not to. Put on your heavy clothes and be on the deck. There are even gloves designed for photographers.

I will be on the ship and all our small boat excursions. We are taking a small plane from Anchorage over Denali so I really needed help with glass.

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Just saw the Aurora Borealis on our cruise! Any help with camera settings for Nikon D500 would be appreciated. I had no clue where to start so I didn’t get any pictures.

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19 hours ago, cruises42 said:

Just saw the Aurora Borealis on our cruise! Any help with camera settings for Nikon D500 would be appreciated. I had no clue where to start so I didn’t get any pictures.

 

Never shot an aurora, but I'm an amateur astrophotographer.  Light is your friend, so you'll want to keep the aperture as wide a possible.  Then you'll need to balance exposure length and ISO.  I've read 2 to 20 seconds for exposure depending on the aurora, but don't have experience to back that up.  If you don't have a tripod on a stable surface (the ship may or may not cut it depending on motion and vibration) exposures could look blurry.  Using the shortest possible lens will help, as well as give you a good field of view.  The motion of the aurora will also be a factor, the longer the exposure the more it is blurred.

 

On my camera I'd start with 1600 or 3200 for ISO and then go up or down based on what I was getting.  If you don't have a stable tripod long exposures are going to be tough, so a very high ISO might be required.  

 

Also, remember to focus your lens to infinity.  That may be easier to do during the day with a very distant object.  At night the moon works (though it potentially washes out an aurora).  Focusing on a bright star is a last ditch option, but isn't super accurate unless you have a focusing mask to help.

 

Again... no expert on auroras, but hopefully that will help.  Worst case, crank up the ISO and try to get something.  It might not be pretty, but it will be a memory!

 

I scanned this quickly and it looked interesting.  Discuss some additional setting like white balance, etc, and goes into more detail on several points I mentioned above.

 

https://www.davemorrowphotography.com/2014/10/how-to-photograph-northern-lights.html

 

Good luck!

 

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