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What's up with Carnival?Aanother ship can't meet max speed.


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Carnival has won several multi-million dollar lawsuits from the manufacturers of the Azipod propulsion systems for things such as faulty bearings.

 

Actually, the majority of Carnival Corp ships don't have podded propulsion, and those that do have ABB azipods (which is a trademark name for ABB). The lawsuit was against Rolls Royce for their competitive Mermaid "podded propulsion system" (since they are not "azipods"), and was only for the QM2's pods, which are the only RR pods in the various fleets.

 

The older V model ABB azipod has had thrust bearing problems, but not to the point of lawsuits, but have resulted in limited speed on some ships, and emergency drydockings for some, across many lines.

 

I believe that as others have posted, most of these recent CCL slowdowns are on ships that do not have azipods, and what you are seeing is the aging of the propulsion motors and their control systems, perhaps due to insufficient maintenance, or because the components in use have never reached this age before, and the maintenance schedule does not have sufficient historical data to accurately predict failure rates.

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Has this ever happened on any other cruise line? Or does it seem to be unique to Carnival ships?

 

 

Happens to all of the lines and is not unique to the old ships like this one.

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Actually, the majority of Carnival Corp ships don't have podded propulsion, and those that do have ABB azipods (which is a trademark name for ABB). The lawsuit was against Rolls Royce for their competitive Mermaid "podded propulsion system" (since they are not "azipods"), and was only for the QM2's pods, which are the only RR pods in the various fleets.

 

The older V model ABB azipod has had thrust bearing problems, but not to the point of lawsuits, but have resulted in limited speed on some ships, and emergency drydockings for some, across many lines.

 

I believe that as others have posted, most of these recent CCL slowdowns are on ships that do not have azipods, and what you are seeing is the aging of the propulsion motors and their control systems, perhaps due to insufficient maintenance, or because the components in use have never reached this age before, and the maintenance schedule does not have sufficient historical data to accurately predict failure rates.

 

Is this the same problem that the Dream had? It needed a drydock and extensive work to even get to the parts that failed.

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Is this the same problem that the Dream had? It needed a drydock and extensive work to even get to the parts that failed.

 

Who, outside of Carnival's technical division, knows? It could be one or more of any possible component that has failed. It could be a motor winding or transformer that requires drydock to cut access to get parts in/out, or it could be a failed circuit breaker that can be gotten in one or two weeks. It could be a shaft bearing problem, that can be worked on when in port, or a seal problem that needs divers in port. Based on only hearing that there is a problem, and nothing else, I couldn't say what the problem is, or what the timeline might be. Either your car needs a tune up, or it needs an engine rebuild, but just saying it isn't running right doesn't give anyone any hints.

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If it is just adults then see if you can get a reservation at Alma Plena Eco Resort. The price includes the round trip taxi fare. They do allow kids, but there is nothing for them to do there but sit on the beach and swim in the ocean.

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Costa Maya is a dock with a avg beach at best and that pretty much wraps up what Costa Maya is. I would be forking up the $50 administration fee and switching sailings

 

 

I'm thinking that without any sort of insurance....it's going to be more than $50pp to switch sailings....

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Costa Maya is a dock with a avg beach at best and that pretty much wraps up what Costa Maya is. I would be forking up the $50 administration fee and switching sailings

 

Actually, there is no 'swimming' beach at Costa Maya. Just loungers overlooking the water and a very large pool with a swim-up bar

 

However, a $3pp less than 10 minute cab ride to Majuhual provides a very nice beach with lots of beach front restaurants. Very relaxing day.

 

There are also some AI resorts close by as well.

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You miss the point

 

 

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You're deflecting and dodging the question. You should be a politician.

 

Again, did the Vista not have propulsion problems? I know the answer and you do too. I know it kills you to admit it, but come on, you can do it. [emoji3] [emoji12] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23]

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You're deflecting and dodging the question. You should be a politician.

 

Again, did the Vista not have propulsion problems? I know the answer and you do too. I know it kills you to admit it, but come on, you can do it. [emoji3] [emoji12] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23]

 

 

Yup they did. Did it have to do with maintenance? No

 

 

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No, they do not owe you money if the itinerary changes. Your contract you signed when you booked clearly states that you are signing for a cruise on a ship for a particular week, and that itinerary can change. You signed it.

The only time you get money back is regarding a change in port docking fees or a missed port the fees are refunded. Nothing more.

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Yup they did. Did it have to do with maintenance? No

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

 

 

Right. Not maintenance. But, it was built by Fincantieri who has a long history of sketchy reliability. It's good to see Carnival moving away from them slowly but surely.

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Paradise has external twin ABB Azipods, the Splendor has internal twin-shaft Converteam electric drive motors. If one of the 2 propulsion units is defective to a level that the ship cannot make it's rated nominal cruise speed, then it should be taken out of service for repairs. There is a possibility that Carnival is using the 2nd, fully functioning propulsion unit to a higher level to compensate for the defective one. Dumb question..... what happens if you are hundreds of miles from shore and the 2nd, fully functioning drive system develops problems ? Yes, they do have multiple power generating systems on board, but if the propulsion problem is one of the 2 actual drive systems, then there is a possibility of a much more serious problem than just slow speed. It appears that Carnival cannot get service on the failed system until June, or..... and much worse, they want to try to hope that the remaining systems will continue to function at over 100% capacity until June so as to not lose any revenue. Would you fly in a twin-engine jet if the right engine wouldn't make full power ?

Edited by TAD2005
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Would you fly in a twin-engine jet if the right engine wouldn't make full power ?

 

Big difference

 

 

I'd probably have serious thoughts running thru my mind about my personal safety and scared &$*@less as to whether we'd make it back on ground alive.

 

On a cruise ship I'd have no such thoughts about getting home alive or personal safety, just disappointment of a port missed or itinerary change.

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Paradise has external twin ABB Azipods, the Splendor has internal twin-shaft Converteam electric drive motors. If one of the 2 propulsion units is defective to a level that the ship cannot make it's rated nominal cruise speed, then it should be taken out of service for repairs. There is a possibility that Carnival is using the 2nd, fully functioning propulsion unit to a higher level to compensate for the defective one. Dumb question..... what happens if you are hundreds of miles from shore and the 2nd, fully functioning drive system develops problems ? Yes, they do have multiple power generating systems on board, but if the propulsion problem is one of the 2 actual drive systems, then there is a possibility of a much more serious problem than just slow speed. It appears that Carnival cannot get service on the failed system until June, or..... and much worse, they want to try to hope that the remaining systems will continue to function at over 100% capacity until June so as to not lose any revenue. Would you fly in a twin-engine jet if the right engine wouldn't make full power ?

 

 

What if it were not a big deal..... Plane and ship analogy's end in that they are transportation...

 

 

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Paradise has external twin ABB Azipods, the Splendor has internal twin-shaft Converteam electric drive motors. If one of the 2 propulsion units is defective to a level that the ship cannot make it's rated nominal cruise speed, then it should be taken out of service for repairs. There is a possibility that Carnival is using the 2nd, fully functioning propulsion unit to a higher level to compensate for the defective one. Dumb question..... what happens if you are hundreds of miles from shore and the 2nd, fully functioning drive system develops problems ? Yes, they do have multiple power generating systems on board, but if the propulsion problem is one of the 2 actual drive systems, then there is a possibility of a much more serious problem than just slow speed. It appears that Carnival cannot get service on the failed system until June, or..... and much worse, they want to try to hope that the remaining systems will continue to function at over 100% capacity until June so as to not lose any revenue. Would you fly in a twin-engine jet if the right engine wouldn't make full power ?

 

You can't use a propulsion system "over 100% capacity". And the systems are designed to operate at 100% capacity 100% of the time. For those ships with shafted propulsion systems (non-pods), each propulsion motor typically has two sets of windings in them, each providing half the power the motor is rated at. These two windings are fed by two separate systems, so in effect you have 4 propulsion systems. Each can operate independently of any other. So, the ship may, in fact, be operating on 3 out of 4 systems, which would still not give full speed, but gives multiple redundancy.

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