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No More Deck 9 Cookouts for HAL

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"Ought to be" being the operative words. I can't remember which ship is was, but there was at least one ship where the lack of a sneeze guard in the Neptune Lounge kept certain foods from being served there. It took forever for that situation to be rectified.

It was the Westerdam. ;)

One thing though:

As long as a HAL ship is not in US waters or departing /arriving from/to a US port, the USPH have no jurisdiction at all over what HAL does onboard, as the ships are DUTCH. At least that is what people, more knowledgeable in Maritime Law are telling me...

 

Having cruised in Europe and on TA's I can say safely that HAL upholds the same standards that they would in US waters.

 

Sadly, that meant no Lido bbq's on our most recent cruise.

 

Sure hope it is fixed by the time we sail again as the Prinsendam really does this right :)

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Checked my books again.

 

Nope. They have no jurisdiction at all when a vessel does not have a US port of call.

However, it makes sense for HAL to apply the rules of the country that is deemed to have the most restrictive regulations and with whom they deal the most. But legally, when doing for example a Mediterranean cruise, the Americans have obviously no jurisdiction.

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What a bout a closed loop sailing that calls in all foreign ports (Mexico for example)? Would they be able to conduct a poolside BBQ / Fiesta, say upon pulling out of Mazatlan and continuing to Puerto Vallarta for example?

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Are there any cruise ships affected by this that never visit any US ports ever?

 

This message may have been entered using voice recognition. Please excuse any typos.

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Amsterdam:

CDC Inspection date: 12/4/2016

Lido Buffet date: 11/25/ 2016

 

Looks like CDC might "inspect" prior events uniess this CDC inspection takes over a several week period of time. Anyone know?

 

As mentioned before, there is still no correction report for this very low 12/16 Amsterdam inspection report of 86. 85 flunks, https://wwwn.cdc.gov/InspectionQueryTool/InspectionDetailReport.aspx?ColI=MTg3ODA0MzI%3d-0XcSd2lvBrM%3d

 

My guess is it would not be good policy for HAL to wait until they were outside of jurisdictional waters and then flaunt restricted activity. Agree, the outdoor buffets are very part of the overall cruise experience so hope they can find a way to keep everyone happy. Particularly memorable ones on the overnights in Istanbul and Shanghai when one has the most primo location in the entire city as all the lights come on and the air is warm.

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With regards to jurisdictional matters:

 

All nations have the right, and most exercise these, to inspect any vessel when entering the country from a foreign port. Health inspectors have been a part of clearing a ship into port for a hundred years. There is the practice of "free pratique", where the Captain assures the port officials that his ship is free of disease, and the port authorities will issue the certificate of "free pratique" without an inspection. So, in terms of cruise ships, every time a ship, whether foreign flag or US flag enters a US port from a foreign destination, the USPH has the mandate to inspect the ship for infectious diseases to keep from introducing those diseases into the US (this is actually the USPH's mandate, not maintaining the cruise passenger's health while onboard). So, they could inspect the ships every week, doing a full inspection, including health interviews with selected passengers and crew; imagine the outrage of the passengers if this lengthy process was part of each and every cruise.

 

The USPH/CDC VSP (Vessel Sanitation Plan) is a joint creation between the USPH/CDC and the cruise industry, which the USPH/CDC has agreed to, whereby if a ship maintains the construction and operational requirements of the plan, throughout voyages that call at US ports, then the requirement for inspection is reduced to a maximum of two random inspections a year.

 

So, all operations the ship undertakes anywhere during its previous voyage can be included in the USPH inspection. Records for many things that are part of a USPH inspection are for the previous full year (GI medical records, pool chemistry, potable water tests, blast chiller records).

 

Many cruise ships that stop calling at US ports for part of the year (European redeployment in summer, for example), will continue to abide by the USPH requirements, just to keep this operational culture and mind set in the crew's "muscle memory" for the eventual return to the US, but it is not a legal requirement. Some ships won't follow this, and these ships tend to have dismal scores at their first USPH inspection upon returning to the US. Some cruise lines will hold to USPH requirements even if a ship is permanently deployed elsewhere in the world, simply to be able to transfer crew from one ship to another without extensive retraining.

 

Ships that call at EU ports must meet the EU's "ShipSan" program, which is very similar to the USPH's VSP.

 

In all other areas, each country can adopt ship sanitation laws, or enact enabling legislation that mirrors the WHO's vessel sanitation requirements.

 

In my experience, having something like the VSP in place results in less individual interpretation of sanitation requirements than in those countries where such a plan does not exist. While I've not heard of "shakedowns" of cruise ships, many countries' health inspectors are known to require bribes to allow cargo ships to enter port.

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chengkp75's explanation makes good sense to me, particularly with regard of needing to keep the crew's "muscle memory" in good shape as to the requirements. It would be foolish for any cruise line to think that because we are out of US waters, we now can ignore the CDC/USPH protocols if the most of the world sees them as being the Gold Standard. I am glad that there is not any fluctuations of standards on safety.

 

But.

 

What I still don't understand is what is the need for more stringent standards, in 2017 for MDR Buffets or Deck BBQs? What is different now from open deck buffets in full Sunlight with sneeze guards never considered during cruises in the '60's, '70's, 80's, etc.? Has the immune system of the human race been so weakened that the CDC believes it must protect us from all these possible evil pathogens?

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chengkp75's explanation makes good sense to me, particularly with regard of needing to keep the crew's "muscle memory" in good shape as to the requirements. It would be foolish for any cruise line to think that because we are out of US waters, we now can ignore the CDC/USPH protocols if the most of the world sees them as being the Gold Standard. I am glad that there is not any fluctuations of standards on safety.

 

But.

 

What I still don't understand is what is the need for more stringent standards, in 2017 for MDR Buffets or Deck BBQs? What is different now from open deck buffets in full Sunlight with sneeze guards never considered during cruises in the '60's, '70's, 80's, etc.? Has the immune system of the human race been so weakened that the CDC believes it must protect us from all these possible evil pathogens?

 

About a year or so ago, I had a question concerning the diapered kid's pool on one of the new RCI ships, where the area held about 2" of water, which was a violation of the construction standards for these pools. I contacted the CDC about this, to see if there had been a change in the requirements. I was told that there was a review undergoing for the VSP, and that a new manual would be forthcoming. They were very friendly, and willing to discuss and research answers to questions.

 

As noted in a previous post, ServSafe regulations may be also requiring changes to public consumption of food prepared outdoors. There may be statistical evidence of outbreaks of food-borne pathogens from cook-outs, that would be the CDC's forte, and they would have the data. If you are really interested, contact them at "vsp@cdc.gov" and ask about the changes in regulations or interpretations, and the reasons why.

 

As to why there may be a need for more stringent regulations today, there are ever more resistant mutations of bacteria and viruses every year, so the incidences of illnesses from cookouts may be on a dramatic rise, I don't know, I haven't studied it.

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I am very skeptical (and cynical) about this sort of "standards" from work experience but it is what it is.

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chengkp75,

 

Thanks for your reply and I will send an e-mail inquiry to the address that you provided.

 

Basic news reports tell us that there are increasing numbers of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Such a concern by the CDC may well be the reason for a change in regulations. In my e-mail request, I am going to ask for whatever data they may have for illness traced to shipboard buffets and deck cook-outs.

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Just off the Zaandam on June 11 and the taco bar is still alive and well :-)

We ate there several times for lunch

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Just off the Zaandam on June 11 and the taco bar is still alive and well :-)

We ate there several times for lunch

 

Taco bar was alive and well on our cruise too.

 

It's not the lido bbq's/cookouts that are being referred to here though. those are a horse of a different colour. Much different ;)

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Taco bar was alive and well on our cruise too.

 

 

 

It's not the lido bbq's/cookouts that are being referred to here though. those are a horse of a different colour. Much different ;)

 

 

 

Personally, while DH enjoys the BBQ's, I do not. Call me a germaphobe, but it's a little creepy to me to eat food that 1000 or so of my best friends breathing on the food! The Lido makes me less leery because the food is somewhat protected with plastic shields.

 

 

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We think buffets (which would include the ole BBQ) are fine...but our personal preference is to relax in a comfy dining room and have waiters see to our needs. Standing in queues for BBQ ribs, water logged corn on the cob (with no corn holders)...and then trying to find a clean table....etc etc....if just not our idea of a great time. If there is a BBQ on deck we will stroll past, eye the offerings, and usually end up in the MDR. If I want a BBQ I can do it at my own home and have what I want cooked to my own specifications, served hot, and with no hassles. We will admit that we once experienced an amazing exception to our rule...and that happened on the Grand Med cruise (Prinsendam) where they had a very nice BBQ luncheon. They opened the aft doors of the MDR and had the grills on the aft of the ship just behind the MDR. One could get their food (all served hot off the grills) and then walk a few feet into the MDR where there was plenty of seating and decent waiter service for drinks, extras, etc. The surprise at that particular BBQ is that they had BBQ Lobster Tails (as much as one wanted) which were terrific.

 

Hank

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We think buffets (which would include the ole BBQ) are fine...but our personal preference is to relax in a comfy dining room and have waiters see to our needs. Standing in queues for BBQ ribs, water logged corn on the cob (with no corn holders)...and then trying to find a clean table....etc etc....if just not our idea of a great time. If there is a BBQ on deck we will stroll past, eye the offerings, and usually end up in the MDR. If I want a BBQ I can do it at my own home and have what I want cooked to my own specifications, served hot, and with no hassles. We will admit that we once experienced an amazing exception to our rule...and that happened on the Grand Med cruise (Prinsendam) where they had a very nice BBQ luncheon. They opened the aft doors of the MDR and had the grills on the aft of the ship just behind the MDR. One could get their food (all served hot off the grills) and then walk a few feet into the MDR where there was plenty of seating and decent waiter service for drinks, extras, etc. The surprise at that particular BBQ is that they had BBQ Lobster Tails (as much as one wanted) which were terrific.

 

Hank

 

Personally, while DH enjoys the BBQ's, I do not. Call me a germaphobe, but it's a little creepy to me to eat food that 1000 or so of my best friends breathing on the food! The Lido makes me less leery because the food is somewhat protected with plastic shields.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

For Hank (hitner),

 

I abhor buffets and standing in line, but the Prinsendam's buffets were magnificent. Everything was cooked to order as you arrived and, yes, as you said, you could go to the MDR if you wanted. One was called the Mongolian and it was fantastic.

 

the selection of fish, shellfish, etc. was amazing.

 

for Innlady1 - along with the Prinsendam we had wonderful bbq's on the Westerdam on our Hawaii, Tahiti Marquesas cruise. There was no "touching and feeling". The crew served and you ordered your tuna or whatever seafood/meat was being served as you wanted. The crew put it on the plate and served. The same with the salad and other goodies.

 

I rarely do buffets as they are just not my cup of tea. But, these two experiences (3 on the P'dam) were so good that I couldn't resist.

 

the fish on the Westerdam was fresh from the islands and a lot of the fish on the P'dam was picked up in the Azores and fresh. It was all delicious.

 

Nothing like this has ever been offered in the MDR other than an Indonesian Collectors' lunch (also on the P'dam and also a buffet) and I doubt it could be with the freshness that we had.

 

I have no expectations, but if there is any leniency on the rules, I know which ship will do it and I will be on her next year ;) I don't have my hopes up though.

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Sounds to me like Hal is looking for an excuse to cut yet another perk out of there cruises!

 

 

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Sounds to me like Hal is looking for an excuse to cut yet another perk out of there cruises!

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

How does that square with the specific CDC violation report about continuing outdoor buffets?

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How does that square with the specific CDC violation report about continuing outdoor buffets?
I agree. What was Canada 59 suggesting? That the cruise line bribed an official to issue a citation against them? :confused:

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No just that they were unwilling to do what was required to keep the service going for the guests, another way of saving money for the company at the clients expense!

 

 

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No just that they were unwilling to do what was required to keep the service going for the guests, another way of saving money for the company at the clients expense!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

How much would it cost to retrofit all their ships to provide this occasional and not universally welcome benefit? Give us your findings so we can see how HAL might have evaluated this current compliance decision. Perhaps as we speak they are trying to retrofit the ships. The CDC violation only happened in Dec 1016 and they have yet to file their follow-up report.

 

I do have to agree with other posters, when these outdoor buffets have been offered the food is just not that good. No matter what the theme. (This does not include the Prinsendam)

 

It is fun to have a dining event outdoors when the night is warm and the harbor view spectacular, but it is a hassle to find seating, slow lines are annoying. However, Worst of all the past few times it has been so dark on deck it was impossible to see what you were getting. You just dug a spoon in and hoped for the best.

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No just that they were unwilling to do what was required to keep the service going for the guests, another way of saving money for the company at the clients expense!
What do you think was "required to keep the service going"?

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How much would it cost to retrofit all their ships to provide this occasional and not universally welcome benefit?

 

I really don't have a dog in this fight and could not care either way if buffets were offered or not. However, I can safely say that the cost to retrofit the ship would probably be less than they are currently spending to retrofit the Crow's Nest into the EXC Tours space which is also not quite universally seen as a benefit, but rather a loss of current amenities.

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Got off Westerdam a few days ago. Fantastic cruise but we did note that there was no deck party/picnic. Over the past few years, we enjoyed food on the deck when cruising the Greek Isles and again during our Baltic cruise (food matched to each port) on HAL. Also there was a dessert night on deck (yes, admittedly pared down each time). This year, nothing-- not even the charade of "try a local specialty," being passed around on trays in hopes you would also buy a drink. These european cruises are so port intensive that we thought it was nice to come in from a day of touring and not have to rush to the cabin and shower and change to eat in the dining room.

With all of that said, generally the food on this cruise was the best we've ever had.

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On Avalon Illumination in Durnstein Germany [emoji629] yesterday and we had the best BBQ on the sky deck I have ever had, Hamburgers, Salmon, Steak, Chicken . Potato Salad Cold Slaw Corn on the Cob,AMAZING! and they are going to do it again tomorrow in Bratislava! First river cruise and will not be my last every thing first class nothing to complain about what so ever! The Chef and staff are brilliant !1eddfb70a094c94542e29d81705b3708.jpga71c6ccc2e6a6b224316414323a6559d.jpg

 

 

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What do you think was "required to keep the service going"?

 

The general public has a difficult time understanding how the United States Public Health Service really works.

Their Cruise Ship Sanitation Manual is very long, very comprehensive and extremely detailed.

One needs to study it for years to get even fairly familiar with all the rules and regulations.

 

During a routine surprise inspection, if every regulation was applied, very few ships would be able to get a passing grade. And if every regulation was applied, the inspection - which normally takes from 3 to 6 hours - would require several days. Your cruise of a lifetime would sail a bit late.

 

So the inspectors come aboard, looking for the most obvious signs of a clean - or unclean - ship. When they see those signs, they then decide to start looking harder - or not.

 

Deck BBQs are a red flag for a USPH Inspection. Most cruise lines try to avoid having them in a US Port - unless they are reasonably sure that they are not scheduled for a surprise inspection that day. Difficulties with sneeze guards, open sky above food service areas, uneven heating of prepared foods, lack of handwashing facilities, open flames, lack of fire blankets and fire extinguishers, ashes flying around, electrical cords running on wet decks, and trip hazards are all things that get USPH inspectors very excited to look for even more problems - which they can always find.

 

Many of the mass market cruise companies got a bit smart and eliminated many of those red flags. Many ships today have electric rather than charcoal BBQ Grills. HAL refused to spend the money to fix that problem.

 

Many of the mass market cruise companies installed overhead electrical outlets for the BBQ and other powered machines needed for the BBQ. HAL refused to spend the money to fix that problem.

 

Many of the mass market cruise companies purchased portable handwashing stations to place next to the BBQ cooking areas. HAL refused to spend the money to fix that problem.

 

Many of the mass market cruise companies installed either portable or fixed bain-maries to keep the BBQ food at the proper temperature, behind sneeze guards. HAL refused to spend the money to fix that problem.

 

Many of the mass market cruise companies purchased market umbrellas and other tent-like structures to keep food service under cover. HAL refused to spend the money to fix that problem.

 

Do you see a pattern forming here??

 

All the cruise lines will still try to avoid deck BBQs in American ports. They just do not want or need the aggravation from USPH. But most of them have made the investments that allow them to serve a proper and safe BBQ to their clients whenever they would like.

 

HAL just is not willing to spend the money.

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The general public has a difficult time understanding how the United States Public Health Service really works.
Indeed, and yet the general public is quick to criticize authorities when something happens that they feel the authorities should have guarded against. It's kind of like a corollary to someone wanting consumer protections to apply when that someone is purchasing products or services but wanting them to not apply when that someone is selling products or services to the public.

 

Do you see a pattern forming here??
I see one person's perception. The problem is that I have seen people posting corresponding criticisms against every other mass market cruise line, with regard to what those cruise lines have done to contain costs. If you read everyone's perspectives, paying especial attention to those of people who have cruised a similar number of times on a number of cruise lines, you get the clear message that they're all basically the same (with some minor compromises vis a vis Carnival and some minor biases in favor of Celebrity).

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Does this mean the Mexican Food Kiosk is gone as well.?? or is it close enough for the washing sinks at the Dive In window ?? One of my favorite things to do on HAL is to swing by the Mexican station around 4:30 and pickup a plate of chips, salsa etc.

for a cocktail in my cabin before dinner. Say it ain't gone please !!

 

It is not gone. Food is preprepared at this station and does not have the same deficiencies CDC is apparently reviewing..

The issues seems to be the actual cooking of food outdoors, as in the occasional outdoor cookouts .

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This is HAL choice. We don't need to be. Negative toward them. HAL has there own marketing ways and so many repeat folks including my partner and my self. It really looks lot cleaner and nice with out all that food stuff and BBQ,s dragged out in deck.

There big difference between Hal and carnival, princess

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This is HAL choice. We don't need to be. Negative toward them. HAL has there own marketing ways and so many repeat folks including my partner and my self. It really looks lot cleaner and nice with out all that food stuff and BBQ,s dragged out in deck.

There big difference between Hal and carnival, princess

 

Umm, I never saw a messy lay out. check out my live thread on the Westerdam. There were live pics taken.

 

It was well done. And FRESH food.

 

On a Caribbean cruise you might not see it. On longer itineraries you do and speaking for myself (that usually abhors buffets), I will miss them.

 

there was nothing dragged out to the deck, but a nice arrangement of beers for our port, the bbq with the lovely choices, etc.

 

Everyone of our bbq's was a unique and lovely experience and NOT available in the MDR or Lido.

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check out my live thread on the Westerdam. There were live pics taken

 

kazu, can you point me to this thread? I'd love to read it! Yes, I admit that I'm technically challenged! ;)

 

Thanks!;)

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Here is the CDC write up for the poor Amsterdam which did not do so well on the last inspections :Score 86

(Other HAL ships did much better - all in the mid or high 90's - and several got the perfect 100 scores)

 

AMSTERDAM:

Item No.: 13Site: Food Service General-Lido Poolside Luau BBQ

 

Violation: A BBQ function occurred last on 25 November on the pool deck, which is not a food area. Staff explained how grills were staged next to a food employee-served buffet station. Although the area had a retractable roof, staff explained how this area is opened for the function since the function is done weekly and only weather permitting. This setup does not provide adequate protection for food and the nearest handwashing stations for the food employees were over 8 meters away.

 

Recommendation: Because of the risks for foodborne illness inherent to the food operation, ensure the supervisor or person in charge of food operations on the vessel demonstrates to VSP - during inspections and on request - knowledge of foodborne disease prevention, application of the Hazard Analysis Critical Point principles, and the food-safety guidelines in this manual. Ensure that the person in charge demonstrates this knowledge: (1) By compliance with these guidelines; (12) Identifying critical-control points in the operation from purchasing through service that when not controlled may contribute to the transmission of foodborne illness and explaining steps taken to ensure the points are controlled in accordance with the guidelines in this manual.

 

This is pure retaliation for a Princess ship dumping stuff in the ocean...

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Here in Port Canaveral the seagulls are known to dive bomb the restaurants along the water for Splenda pkgs! Yes, they seem to be able to tell the differences of the pkgs!!

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We think buffets (which would include the ole BBQ) are fine...but our personal preference is to relax in a comfy dining room and have waiters see to our needs. Standing in queues for BBQ ribs, water logged corn on the cob (with no corn holders)...and then trying to find a clean table....etc etc....if just not our idea of a great time. If there is a BBQ on deck we will stroll past, eye the offerings, and usually end up in the MDR. If I want a BBQ I can do it at my own home and have what I want cooked to my own specifications, served hot, and with no hassles. We will admit that we once experienced an amazing exception to our rule...and that happened on the Grand Med cruise (Prinsendam) where they had a very nice BBQ luncheon. They opened the aft doors of the MDR and had the grills on the aft of the ship just behind the MDR. One could get their food (all served hot off the grills) and then walk a few feet into the MDR where there was plenty of seating and decent waiter service for drinks, extras, etc. The surprise at that particular BBQ is that they had BBQ Lobster Tails (as much as one wanted) which were terrific.

 

 

 

 

I

Hank

 

I love the sound of this. So civilized and nicely done.

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This is pure retaliation for a Princess ship dumping stuff in the ocean...

 

There is a very good chance you are correct.

 

I was working on Oosterdam several years ago when they received an 86 score from USPH.

The Captain and Hotel Manager were very concerned that they might lose their jobs - until the Lead Inspector announced that the score was a retaliation for HAL Senior Management refusing to follow suggestions from USPH Inspectors who were monitoring HAL newbuilds in Italy.

 

After a very painful conference call with Seattle, all was sorted out.

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There is a very good chance you are correct.

 

I was working on Oosterdam several years ago when they received an 86 score from USPH.

The Captain and Hotel Manager were very concerned that they might lose their jobs - until the Lead Inspector announced that the score was a retaliation for HAL Senior Management refusing to follow suggestions from USPH Inspectors who were monitoring HAL newbuilds in Italy.

 

After a very painful conference call with Seattle, all was sorted out.

 

Your post makes me loose a bit of faith in the USPH scores that we see. Retaliation by a government agency has no place in a process that is supposed to protect public health.

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There is a very good chance you are correct.

 

I was working on Oosterdam several years ago when they received an 86 score from USPH.

The Captain and Hotel Manager were very concerned that they might lose their jobs - until the Lead Inspector announced that the score was a retaliation for HAL Senior Management refusing to follow suggestions from USPH Inspectors who were monitoring HAL newbuilds in Italy.

 

After a very painful conference call with Seattle, all was sorted out.

 

Interesting that you say USPH was making "suggestions", when the construction guidelines are very clear and very detailed, and required to be met in order to qualify for VSP inspections.

 

Your post makes me loose a bit of faith in the USPH scores that we see. Retaliation by a government agency has no place in a process that is supposed to protect public health.

 

Was the 86 score a "false" score, or was it accurate given that USPH management requested the inspectors to be "extremely vigilant" in inspecting and applying the guidelines. I don't think there were any "made up" infractions, just that the inspectors looked more closely at every single item, which is actually the way they should do all inspections.

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I have a very close friend who is retired after a long career inspecting cruise ships for USPH.

He had - and has - a reputation for being honest and fair.

 

He admitted to me several times that before the inspection begins, USPH inspectors already know the basic score that a ship will receive after the inspection. That is, unless they find any surprises. If the ship is exceptionally clean - or exceptionally dirty - the pre-ordained score can change.

 

As I posted earlier, USPH inspectors can choose which regulations they want to inspect for and enforce. If they inspected every item in the USPH manual, they would be there for several days - and nearly every ship would fail the inspection.

 

When the inspectors want to lower an inspection score, there are several simple ways to do it.

The area and distance between the dirty pan storage and the clean pan storage in the galley potwash area is one of their favorites. The minimum distance is specified in the manual, but splash prevention measures are not clearly spelled out. This is a judgement call by the inspectors. This is a 2 point deduction.

 

Galley can openers is another one. They are always dirty. 2 points.

 

The shepard's hooks at the swimming pools is another. They are almost never as long as required in the manual. It also depends on how they are measured. 2 points.

 

The warning signs at the pool is another. USPH specifies that the text letters must be a certain size. If inspected, another 2 points.

 

Void spaces around galley areas are also good. Gallery cleaners use too much water on the decks. The water seeps into the void spaces and sits there forever. It's too difficult to open those areas to clean them and drain the water. USPH inspectors rarely bother to open those spaces for inspections - unless they need to deduct a few more points.

 

Stainless steel welds in food storage and production areas can result in 2 points deduction anytime they need it. Gaps between steel panels must be tight enough to prevent a credit card sliding between them. But the crew are always crashing trolleys, hand trucks, and fork lifts into the stainless panels and breaking the welds. Very few ships are willing or able to do stainless steel welding repair, so there are always unacceptable gaps in food areas. 2 points.

 

Under counter refrigerators in galleys and pantries are always a problem. On any given day, there are several - or more - that are not maintaining cold enough temperatures. If the ship is in a US port and expects an inspection, they simply remove the food from these reefers and put an out of order sign on the door.

But if inspectors find "too many" of these, or find machines that have been out of order "too long", they can deduct points. How many is "too many", and how long is "too long"? That is up to the inspector.

2 more points.

 

My personal favorites;

Deck-head Condensation around dishwashers and cracked galley floor tiles.

There is ALWAYS deck-head condensation around dishwashers, and ALWAYS cracked floor tiles in galleys.

If the inspector chooses to see them and write them down - and more importantly chooses to make them deductible items rather than just findings - that makes 3 more points deducted.

 

So now you know, more or less, how Amsterdam and Oosterdam received such low USPH scores.

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