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How is it Possible That a Container Ship Collided with a USN Destroyer Near Japan?


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Makes me kinda unsettled that this kind of thing can actually happen. Neither ships radar saw the other? Unlikely. The only plausible explanation is that the bridge crew on both ships weren't paying attention for an extended period of time. Don't modern ships have collision avoidance alarms?

 

If this could happen to a USN Destroyer, it's not out of the question that it could happen to a cruise ship. Makes one wonder.

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/u-s-naval-vessel-collides-merchant-ship-southwest-japan-n773521

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In the past 60 years the US Navy has had many more fatalities (completely removed from any hostile action) than the entire worldwide cruise industry.

 

We should be thankful that they are not allowed to drive or operate cruise ships.

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In the past 60 years the US Navy has had many more fatalities (completely removed from any hostile action) than the entire worldwide cruise industry.

 

We should be thankful that they are not allowed to drive or operate cruise ships.

They didn't see each other? Or neither one wanted to move from what they thought was their "given" route. Unbelievable!

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Hmmmm.

 

Nothing in this report gives us a clue as to who or what was at fault, so why the theorising from thousands of miles away.:rolleyes:

 

The fault of the destroyer captain?

Or the container-ship captain?

Or some other officer or a local pilot on either ship?

Or even some other ship which baulked one of those vessels.

 

A navigational or steering or other mechanical mal-function?

 

The weather?

We know it was dark, we don't know if it was foggy or stormy.

 

So how about we learn more before hypothesising.

Or better still, wait for the marine safety experts' report.

 

JB :)

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Hmmmm, One wonders, Where IS the OP: Navybanker when we need his honest and knowledgeable input when we need it. I hope they do find those missing sailors. I was always under the impression that actual collisions between ships, regardless of nations, were extremely rare, or possibly not given the news coverage.

 

Mac.

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Hmmmm, One wonders, Where IS the OP: Navybanker when we need his honest and knowledgeable input when we need it. I hope they do find those missing sailors. I was always under the impression that actual collisions between ships, regardless of nations, were extremely rare, or possibly not given any news coverage.

 

Mac.

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Hmmmm.

 

Nothing in this report gives us a clue as to who or what was at fault, so why the theorising from thousands of miles away.:rolleyes:

 

The fault of the destroyer captain?

Or the container-ship captain?

Or some other officer or a local pilot on either ship?

Or even some other ship which baulked one of those vessels.

 

A navigational or steering or other mechanical mal-function?

 

The weather?

We know it was dark, we don't know if it was foggy or stormy.

 

So how about we learn more before hypothesising.

Or better still, wait for the marine safety experts' report.

 

JB :)

 

Size dictate's.

 

The biggest ship has the right of way cuz it's the hardest to turn.

.

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Makes me kinda unsettled that this kind of thing can actually happen. Neither ships radar saw the other? Unlikely. The only plausible explanation is that the bridge crew on both ships weren't paying attention for an extended period of time. Don't modern ships have collision avoidance alarms?

 

If this could happen to a USN Destroyer, it's not out of the question that it could happen to a cruise ship. Makes one wonder.

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/u-s-naval-vessel-collides-merchant-ship-southwest-japan-n773521

 

This is pure speculation with no basis in fact at this point. The only ones who are in a position to know for sure what happened on these ships and provide a plausible explanation is their Captains - and I don't believe there has been any information released yet by either or them to the general public. How it was possible remains to be seen and will ultimately be a matter of fact and events, not speculation.

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Size dictate's.

 

The biggest ship has the right of way cuz it's the hardest to turn.

.

 

Yes, and because it takes the longest time to change speed.

 

But we don't know whether a decision not to give-way was the cause.

Shoot the navy captain now, ask questions later ????????????

 

JB :)

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Yes, and because it takes the longest time to change speed.

 

But we don't know whether a decision not to give-way was the cause.

Shoot the navy captain now, ask questions later ????????????

 

JB :)

 

I don't think the U.S. Navy investigators and senior command will be lurking here on CC in order to get information regarding the accident or find out what they should do with the Captain.

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I don't think the U.S. Navy investigators and senior command will be lurking here on CC in order to get information regarding the accident or find out what they should do with the Captain.

 

 

You misunderstand my post, Dawg ;)

 

"Shoot now & ask questions later" isn't my suggestion to the Navy brass.

It's my criticism of those on this thread who've already decided that the Navy captain was at fault.

 

JB :)

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You misunderstand my post, Dawg ;)

 

"Shoot now & ask questions later" isn't my suggestion to the Navy brass.

It's my criticism of those on this thread who've already decided that the Navy captain was at fault.

 

JB :)

 

Agree. Or are drawing assumptive conclusions as to cause without any factual information yet available.

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Size dictate's.

 

The biggest ship has the right of way cuz it's the hardest to turn.

 

Yes, and because it takes the longest time to change speed.

 

They're both power driven vessels, offshore where neither was constrained by draft. That means vessel on the right has right-of-way. It has nothing to do with size.

 

This is in no way a judgement of fault but at first glance....since the container ship has bow damage and the destroyer has starboard side damage...the indication is the container ship had right-of-way.

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Makes me kinda unsettled that this kind of thing can actually happen. Neither ships radar saw the other? Unlikely. The only plausible explanation is that the bridge crew on both ships weren't paying attention for an extended period of time. Don't modern ships have collision avoidance alarms?

 

If this could happen to a USN Destroyer, it's not out of the question that it could happen to a cruise ship. Makes one wonder.

/quote]

 

The "only" plausible explanation....NO. There could have been a mechanical failure of some sort on the DDG.

 

The container ship could have been on auto pilot with a minimum crew on the bridge at that hour. (it happened around 2-3am) while the Navy vessel would have had a full watch crew on the bridge, cic as well as topside lookouts. someone would have seen or noticed a large container ship of her starboard side and thus could have taken an emergency course change. (2 screws and 4 gas turbine engines those destroyers are fast and quite nimble. Especially compared to a cargo ship) Having been on a navy ship that had mechanical failures it is a viable reason.

 

Just tossing that out there before some folks start blaming the crew of the navy ship before any facts are known.

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Size dictate's.

 

The biggest ship has the right of way cuz it's the hardest to turn.

.

 

Other things being equal, yes the less maneuverable has right of way-- but there are a number of other governing conditions: in an overtaking situation, the ship being passed has right of way, in a crossing situation the one to starboard of the other has right of way - among many others.

 

It is pointless to speculate right now, given the lack of information.

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You misunderstand my post, Dawg ;)

 

"Shoot now & ask questions later" isn't my suggestion to the Navy brass.

It's my criticism of those on this thread who've already decided that the Navy captain was at fault.

 

JB :)

 

But John, who cares what those people think? The Navy sure as shooting doesn't, so why should we? Those posters have every right to be judgmental twits whose opinions are meaningless.;)

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Other things being equal, yes the less maneuverable has right of way--

 

Only if the ship had a declaration of Restricted Ability to Maneuver. It's very unlikely that a container ship at sea was restricted.

 

But John, who cares what those people think? The Navy sure as shooting doesn't, so why should we? Those posters have every right to be judgmental twits whose opinions are meaningless.;)

 

I don't think there's anything wrong with discussion. I don't agree with mnocket's "only plausible" comments but for those who have experience in this field, discussion is healthy. I was a Deck Watch Officer and I still conduct maritime investigations today, so I welcome healthy discussion...as long as its somewhat educated...on a topic like this.

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I don't think there's anything wrong with discussion. I don't agree with mnocket's "only plausible" comments but for those who have experience in this field, discussion is healthy. I was a Deck Watch Officer and I still conduct maritime investigations today, so I welcome healthy discussion...as long as its somewhat educated...on a topic like this.

 

I agree, have an educated discussion and just ignore the uneducated comments because in the end, those posters' uneducated comments are meaningless.

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OK, having read the comments my "only plausible" comment reflects a degree of ignorance regarding the situation. That said, I was under the impression that modern seafaring was at the point where ship-ship collisions in open seas was virtually impossible - even if one ship had some sort of malfunction. Even if on autopilot, I had thought 1) The bridge would be manned and radar monitored, 2) The autopilot or a separate collision avoidance system would monitor radar and warn of a collision. Could two ships actually collide without either one being aware of the situation? If they were aware of the situation and in communication with each other, how is it possible that the collision couldn't be avoided?

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