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St. Thomas, V.I.


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Is there a village within walking distance of the pier in St. Thomas?

 

 

What do you want in a village? If you are looking for s=shops and places for a bitet o eat, yes, you can walk to that from both docks. if your re a Havensight there e is much more immediately in the area. . If at Crown Bay, g there are some shops btt fewer. We used to walk oftten from Havensight t to Charlotte

Amaliee which is the do sn town. It is not as nice a alk from Crown Bay, however, there are jitney shared taxis for ab out $4 pp that will take you down town and back.

 

Keep in mind the horrid hurricanes that hit St. thomas this summer/fall. There may still be some unrepaired da mage and more clean up to do.

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We were there the week of Nov. 11 (forget exact date), and I don't know where we docked, but the little town was a five minute walk away from the ship. We did the Meagan's Bay beach excursion, with HA, and it was very nice. You do see a lot of devastation on the island. At that time, most of the island was still without electricity. At the beach we went to, there were all new loungers and umbrellas (rent $), and the area around it was obviously cleaned up. New trees had been planted and there were a lot waiting to be planted. There were hydro trucks and repair trucks everywhere and you could see a lot of the homes and buildings had blue tarps for roofs. When the ship pulled out of port it was getting dark and you could see hardly any lights on the island. This island still needs a lot of work to get back to normal. I think it's important to support them by visiting and purchasing items.

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We were there the week of Nov. 11 (forget exact date), and I don't know where we docked, but the little town was a five minute walk away from the ship. We did the Meagan's Bay beach excursion, with HA, and it was very nice. You do see a lot of devastation on the island. At that time, most of the island was still without electricity. At the beach we went to, there were all new loungers and umbrellas (rent $), and the area around it was obviously cleaned up. New trees had been planted and there were a lot waiting to be planted. There were hydro trucks and repair trucks everywhere and you could see a lot of the homes and buildings had blue tarps for roofs. When the ship pulled out of port it was getting dark and you could see hardly any lights on the island. This island still needs a lot of work to get back to normal. I think it's important to support them by visiting and purchasing items.

 

We're off to St. Thomas Christmas week on Koningsdam, and one of my work colleagues suggested I call a friend of hers in Charlotte Amalie who does excursions. When I spoke to him last week, he confirmed that a large portion of the island is still without electricity. He and his family are using a generator. It may be many months before these islands are back to normal. Very sad, so we feel it's particularly important to try to support them with our tourist $$s.

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In addition to the shops just off the pier within the Crown Bay complex there's a supermarket less than a half mile (easy walk) toward downtown. It has island prices (I like to sneak a peek on the prices for Ben & Jerry's ice cream) but you can get some soda or a bottle of inexpensive wine there.

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Maybe the tax dollars that were used to fix up the tourist areas in a mad rush, paying exorbitant, inflated rates for labour and materials could have gone into fixing the island infrastructure like power, water, fuel. Yes, the island does need tourist dollars to recover, but blowing tax payer's dollars so tourists can ride in air conditioned comfort in tour buses, noses pressed against the windows, looking at all of the devastation doesn't make the local population get warm fuzzy feeling for tourists. Two and one half months without power or fresh water will make anyone a little negative.

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Maybe the tax dollars that were used to fix up the tourist areas in a mad rush, paying exorbitant, inflated rates for labour and materials could have gone into fixing the island infrastructure like power, water, fuel. Yes, the island does need tourist dollars to recover, but blowing tax payer's dollars so tourists can ride in air conditioned comfort in tour buses, noses pressed against the windows, looking at all of the devastation doesn't make the local population get warm fuzzy feeling for tourists. Two and one half months without power or fresh water will make anyone a little negative.

 

"Blowing tax dollars" to help these Ameican peoople get their lives back together???????????? Huh? Why is it different tthan spending those ttax dollars to help the people in Texas, LA and FLOrida after a hurricane? Or NYC or Boston after a serious storm? those are American loca tions as is St. thomas, which is ( USVI) the United States Virrgin Islands........ It is U.S. and the people living there are Ameican.

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"Blowing tax dollars" to help these Ameican peoople get their lives back together???????????? Huh? Why is it different tthan spending those ttax dollars to help the people in Texas, LA and FLOrida after a hurricane? Or NYC or Boston after a serious storm? those are American loca tions as is St. thomas, which is ( USVI) the United States Virrgin Islands........ It is U.S. and the people living there are Ameican.

 

The taxpayer $$$ were not used to help these US citizens get their lives back. They are still, to this day, without power and fresh water. So how did all those tax $$$ help the US Citizens of St. Thomas ?? The tax $$$ were used to quickly repair the tourist areas and facilities. In Texas, the tax $$$ were not used so tourists could take bus rides and see the massive flooding, they used tax $$$ to help the citizens restore their communities. Maybe you misunderstood my post. People getting the simple basic needs to live, like power and water take precedence over hurried band aids so tourists can buy their tee-shirts and souvenirs..

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The taxpayer $$$ were not used to help these US citizens get their lives back. They are still, to this day, without power and fresh water. So how did all those tax $$$ help the US Citizens of St. Thomas ?? The tax $$$ were used to quickly repair the tourist areas and facilities. In Texas, the tax $$$ were not used so tourists could take bus rides and see the massive flooding, they used tax $$$ to help the citizens restore their communities. Maybe you misunderstood my post. People getting the simple basic needs to live, like power and water take precedence over hurried band aids so tourists can buy their tee-shirts and souvenirs..

 

Last I looked, I am quite sure it is the U.S.Taxpayers who pay the U.S.Military and bless all who wear t that uniform to take care of us in so many ways. We don't pay them anywhere near enough, IMO..

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The taxpayer $$$ were not used to help these US citizens get their lives back. They are still, to this day, without power and fresh water. So how did all those tax $$$ help the US Citizens of St. Thomas ?? The tax $$$ were used to quickly repair the tourist areas and facilities. In Texas, the tax $$$ were not used so tourists could take bus rides and see the massive flooding, they used tax $$$ to help the citizens restore their communities. Maybe you misunderstood my post. People getting the simple basic needs to live, like power and water take precedence over hurried band aids so tourists can buy their tee-shirts and souvenirs..

 

I share your concerns about how resource allocation has been prioritized, though I am not a taxpayer in the US.

 

On FB, I see differing opinions from the residents of the hardest-hit islands. There is no consensus even from the residents. As a human being, though, it bothers me that the citizens are without basics while scarce resources are being used to restore tourist facilities.

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Is there a village within walking distance of the pier in St. Thomas?

 

I just docked a couple days ago in Charlotte Amalie. From the ship, one can see there are still some buildings up the hillsides that have blue tarps showing over the roof. You can also see numerous boats remaining washed ashore from the hurricanes. There is plenty within walking distance of the pier. My experience is that the locals are ready to welcome you and appreciate your support in the form of spending your tourist dollars. You'll find shopping and restaurants ready to welcome you. I hope you enjoy your visit.

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The taxpayer $$$ were not used to help these US citizens get their lives back. They are still, to this day, without power and fresh water. So how did all those tax $$$ help the US Citizens of St. Thomas ?? The tax $$$ were used to quickly repair the tourist areas and facilities. In Texas, the tax $$$ were not used so tourists could take bus rides and see the massive flooding, they used tax $$$ to help the citizens restore their communities. Maybe you misunderstood my post. People getting the simple basic needs to live, like power and water take precedence over hurried band aids so tourists can buy their tee-shirts and souvenirs..

I understand your concern, but the economy of the USVI is heavily dependent on tourism so if the restoration of tourist access wasn't put on the front burner you'd have about the same state of affairs wrt overall infrastructure and still no outside tourist dollars doming in.

 

We've just been told this week that QM2 will be calling on St. Thomas on Dec 26 after all (both it and St. Maarten were originally scheduled, then dropped) and we're trying to think about activities that would benefit the locals with our tourist dollars the most (as opposed to spending money at the jewelry stores owned by outsiders). So patronize local tours, locally owned restaurants, etc. Try to spend more than we normally would at "trinket" stands, specifically at affected islands.

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Can one bring a bottle on board from an excursion?

If it's a HAL excursion you don't pay corkage. If not a HAL excursion you can still bring on board but they will store it for you then deliver to your room on the last night. If you want to drink it on board you will pay the corkage.

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If it's a HAL excursion you don't pay corkage. If not a HAL excursion you can still bring on board but they will store it for you then deliver to your room on the last night. If you want to drink it on board you will pay the corkage.

quote- "If it's a HAL excursion you don't pay corkage" unquote - where did you get that information?? I am not sure that is correct.

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We plan to enjoy lunch at Gladys Cafe...as we always do... when we’re in St. Thomas in February. Gladys Cafe is a favorite...I’ve been following her FB page. She re-opened early on after the hurricanes and provided meals to rescue workers.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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If it's a HAL excursion you don't pay corkage. If not a HAL excursion you can still bring on board but they will store it for you then deliver to your room on the last night. If you want to drink it on board you will pay the corkage.

 

quote- "If it's a HAL excursion you don't pay corkage" unquote - where did you get that information?? I am not sure that is correct.

There is no corkage fee for wine brought back from a HAL-sponsored shore excursion ONLY IF AND WHEN that excursion includes a stop at a winery.

 

From the HAL excursion website:

 

Notes:

Minimum age is 18 years. To participate in the wine tasting portion of this tour you must be of legal age and accompanied by an adult age 21 or older.

Corkage policy: The on-board corkage fee is waived for one bottle of wine per person for wine purchased during this tour.

We very often purchase wine to bring back onboard when visiting wine producing areas and have always paid corkage.

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We plan to enjoy lunch at Gladys Cafe...as we always do... when we’re in St. Thomas in February. Gladys Cafe is a favorite...I’ve been following her FB page. She re-opened early on after the hurricanes and provided meals to rescue workers.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Gladys'; Cafe is such a popular place. Lots of cruisers have lunch there, as do many locals.

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There is no corkage fee for wine brought back from a HAL-sponsored shore excursion ONLY IF AND WHEN that excursion includes a stop at a winery.

 

From the HAL excursion website:

 

Notes:

Minimum age is 18 years. To participate in the wine tasting portion of this tour you must be of legal age and accompanied by an adult age 21 or older.

Corkage policy: The on-board corkage fee is waived for one bottle of wine per person for wine purchased during this tour.

We very often purchase wine to bring back onboard when visiting wine producing areas and have always paid corkage.

Thank you for the update, I hadn't seen that before. Thank you for correcting me.
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I am torn as a tourist. I know the island needs the tourist dollars bit I wish the residents had power restored before the port shops were up and running.

 

As far as I am aware, the cruise lines partnered with maegans bay to get it back up and running for the tourists.

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