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ClipperinSFO

Outdoor Decks and Rough Weather

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We are about to do a mid-December crossing on QM2 and are looking for (hoping?) for an animated ride. Two questions:

1) What source do people use for Atlantic marine forecasts?
2) If wind and sea conditions warrant, does the crew close of access to outside decks (like the promenade deck) and/or private balconies?

Thanks for any information.

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2) Yes, the doors to the promenade can be closed during adverse weather. I don't know if this extends to the stern deck areas. Balconies aren't closed to access though. The sheltered balconies on 4-5-6 are still usable; on higher decks you can go out but you may not want to.

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[quote name='ClipperinSFO']We are about to do a mid-December crossing on QM2 and are looking for (hoping?) for an animated ride. Two questions:

1) What source do people use for Atlantic marine forecasts?
2) If wind and sea conditions warrant, does the crew close of access to outside decks (like the promenade deck) and/or private balconies?

Thanks for any information.[/quote]

We had force 11 winds on our westbound crossing this september - and the Beaufort scale only goes to 12.

All the Deck 7 access to the promenade deck were roped off - but some hardy souls were on the deck anyway [access via the aft doors from decks 6 and 8]. There were even some both wet and hardy folks in the 'minnows' pool on deck 6.

The 'lookout' above the bridge on deck 13 & the deck 11 observation deck were off limits - but the the deck 12 doors from the Pavilion pool often were available.

We had a sheltered balcony on deck 5 - and that lived up to its name. We could stand on the balcony in relative calm with an 80 knot 'breeze' just outside.

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Try [URL="http://www.windy.com"]www.windy.com[/URL]

We had wind and wave craziness on the QV crossing the Bay of Biscay in December. Hardly a soul around the ship due to Mal de Mer. Waves went well over the windows in the pub. I was still able to walk around the prom getting pictures. 'Twas awesome! Had to hang on tight though. lol

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I use the link below from the U.S. Navy that shows wind and wave forecasts for most of the World's oceans..
The forecasts go out 180 hours


[url]https://www.fnmoc.navy.mil/wxmap_cgi/index.html[/url]

Aloha,

John

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Just finished a R/T QM2 crossing, 11/12 >> 11/26, and some days, parts of some decks were closed due to winds. Your TV in your stateroom will list this, on channel 45. Some days, the winds were so strong, we could not open the door to our balcony.

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Did the November round trip crossing - force 10 on several days. Some times all decks close other days only some. As already stated check your TV channel and take a look at the ships web cam.

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I check the BBC weather site as you can get a pressure chart for the Atlantic for the next 5 days which will give a very good idea of how windy it will be. Not sure if this will work in the US though.

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During my eastbound crossing last month, all outer decks were closed for a good three days as we experienced some very high force 11 winds. It's my first time sailing on QM2 where all outer decks were closed, and for such a long period. Meanwhile QM2 just plowed through it and honestly there was very little movement. She is such a powerhouse of the seas. I would have preferred more movement as it's a major reason I love winter crossings.

[img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4554/24018225467_13f496eb1d_c.jpg[/img]

[img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4553/38883000631_7e9ac93a61_c.jpg[/img]

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[quote name='eroller']During my eastbound crossing last month, all outer decks were closed for a good three days as we experienced some very high force 11 winds. It's my first time sailing on QM2 where all outer decks were closed, and for such a long period. Meanwhile QM2 just plowed through it and honestly there was very little movement. She is such a powerhouse of the seas. I would have preferred more movement as it's a major reason I love winter crossings. [/quote]

Thanks for all the responses and weather sources. I am a bit disappointed to read about how smooth the ride is on the QM2. We first crossed on the QE2 in late October and went through a major storm, which was definitely the highlight of the trip. We instantly became winter crossing converts, but this is our first on the QM2.

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[quote name='ClipperinSFO']Thanks for all the responses and weather sources. I am a bit disappointed to read about how smooth the ride is on the QM2. We first crossed on the QE2 in late October and went through a major storm, which was definitely the highlight of the trip. We instantly became winter crossing converts, but this is our first on the QM2.[/QUOTE]



I feel your pain. I love QM2 but she is almost too good a sea boat.

QE2 would pitch quite a bit even in moderate seas. In the same seas you barely feel QM2 move.

This is not to say that QM2 is immune to movement. Nothing is as powerful as Mother Nature, but QM2 is as smooth a passenger ship as you will ever find.

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We were on the Dec 15 crossing two years ago and enjoyed some pretty dramatic weather. We're on the same trip again this year and frankly are hoping for more of the same. What would a mid-winter north Atlantic crossing be without some extreme weather! Just you, the sea, the elements... can't wait to be back on board.

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[quote name='alc13'] What would a mid-winter north Atlantic crossing be without some extreme weather! Just you, the sea, the elements... can't wait to be back on board.[/quote]

Amen. And here I thought we were the only ones who thought that way!

And for reference, during that rough crossing on the QE2, the last 2 days before New York were smooth as glass. I have never been so bored (or felt such a let down) in my entire life. Give me rock and roll any day!

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QM2 definitely CAN move around quite a bit. I was quite literally thrown out of bed on one summer crossing, hurting my shoulder on the wall.

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The most extreme movement we experienced was side-to-side; whereas the pitching was much less noticeable. A bottle of water in our cabin rolled off a table and broke. It was a wild ride.

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If you want to throw up on a crossing, take the QV. If you don't want to throw up on a crossing, take the QM2. Ask me how I know.

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[quote name='orvil']If you want to throw up on a crossing, take the QV. If you don't want to throw up on a crossing, take the QM2. Ask me how I know.[/quote]

I've never encountered that problem on any Cunarder that I've been on, but crossing the Drake Channel once on another line, oh my!:eek:

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[quote name='eroller']During my eastbound crossing last month, all outer decks were closed for a good three days as we experienced some very high force 11 winds. It's my first time sailing on QM2 where all outer decks were closed, and for such a long period. Meanwhile QM2 just plowed through it and honestly there was very little movement. She is such a powerhouse of the seas. I would have preferred more movement as it's a major reason I love winter crossings.

[img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4554/24018225467_13f496eb1d_c.jpg[/img]

[img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4553/38883000631_7e9ac93a61_c.jpg[/img][/quote]

We were just lucky that the seas were with us. It could have been entirely different if the seas were from a different direction. Nevertheless doing over 23 knots during a "violent storm" certainly was impressive!

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