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Shorts in dining room 1st night


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Google St. Elmo’s Steakhouse Indianapolis ( a top tier restaurant in my town ) . It’s the go to place for Peyton Manning and others.

 

The waiters are in suits with bow ties and the tables are wearing white tablecloths.

 

The patrons are in jeans, shorts, Polo type shirts etc. .. some even in ball caps, game day attire or such.

 

 

***********

Some people drive through a subdivision going 50 in a 25 mph zone. Does that make it right since some people do it?

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Some people drive through a subdivision going 50 in a 25 mph zone. Does that make it right since some people do it?

 

How is that in any way a legitimate correlation? What is the linkage? How is doing something illegal and dangerous to health and safety in any way, in this universe, related to going to dinner on vacation in shorts if your luggage has not arrived? You probably think people should be denied what they have paid for. Is this an accurate guess?

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You probably think people should be denied what they have paid for. Is this an accurate guess?

 

I know you'd like to make this question of whether people should be denied what they have paid for a "yes or no" question, but it is not. There are a whole spectrum of qualifiers embedded in it. For example:

 

-- If someone comes to the door of the MDR without shirt or shoes, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

-- If someone comes to the door overserved and belligerent to staff, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

-- If someone has soiled their pants and comes to the door, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

I'd hope that in these instances it's clear there are reasons to say yes.

 

Where do shorts fall on this spectrum? I'm not about to speak for others, but for myself I'd adhere to the recommended dress to make it easy all around for everyone. No stress, no challenges. Whether you want to consider it a norm, a social convention, a recommendation or a rule -- it's what makes it easy for all to get along when we have to in relatively small social spaces.

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I know you'd like to make this question of whether people should be denied what they have paid for a "yes or no" question, but it is not. There are a whole spectrum of qualifiers embedded in it. For example:

 

-- If someone comes to the door of the MDR without shirt or shoes, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

-- If someone comes to the door overserved and belligerent to staff, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

-- If someone has soiled their pants and comes to the door, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

I'd hope that in these instances it's clear there are reasons to say yes.

 

Where do shorts fall on this spectrum? I'm not about to speak for others, but for myself I'd adhere to the recommended dress to make it easy all around for everyone. No stress, no challenges. Whether you want to consider it a norm, a social convention, a recommendation or a rule -- it's what makes it easy for all to get along when we have to in relatively small social spaces.

 

I agree with your 3 examples.

 

But the question put forth really is a simple yes or no; if someone doesn't receive their luggage before dinner and is wearing shorts, should they be denied the food and service they have paid for? Let's assume they are not belligerent and did not soil their pants...

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Good point.

 

Putting it another way, why would anyone dressed casually want a tablecloth?

 

I hope someone can answer that.

 

Again, if you're wearing jeans or shorts, would it be ok if your tablecloth was removed? If no, why?

 

Should you be allowed to decide whether another patron's table has a table cloth or not? If ambiance makes a fine dining establishment, do you have the right to dictate that others contribute to your ambiance? Why is your ambiance more important than theirs? Why do you allow the clothing choices made by others to determine whether you enjoy your dinner?

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Google St. Elmo’s Steakhouse Indianapolis ( a top tier restaurant in my town ) . It’s the go to place for Peyton Manning and others.

 

The waiters are in suits with bow ties and the tables are wearing white tablecloths.

 

The patrons are in jeans, shorts, Polo type shirts etc. .. some even in ball caps, game day attire or such.

 

 

***********

Some people drive through a subdivision going 50 in a 25 mph zone. Does that make it right since some people do it?

Well now, that's just a silly comparison. Driving a car above the speed limit? We're simply talking about wearing shorts in a dining room. Why has this conversation become so contentious? Who really cares? For some reason this seems to be more of an issue on the HAL boards, than in any of the others. Rarely, do I see this issue of appropriate attire discussed on the Celebrity and Princess boards.
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I know you'd like to make this question of whether people should be denied what they have paid for a "yes or no" question, but it is not. There are a whole spectrum of qualifiers embedded in it. For example:

 

-- If someone comes to the door of the MDR without shirt or shoes, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

-- If someone comes to the door overserved and belligerent to staff, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

-- If someone has soiled their pants and comes to the door, should they be denied what they have paid for?

 

I'd hope that in these instances it's clear there are reasons to say yes.

 

Where do shorts fall on this spectrum? I'm not about to speak for others, but for myself I'd adhere to the recommended dress to make it easy all around for everyone. No stress, no challenges. Whether you want to consider it a norm, a social convention, a recommendation or a rule -- it's what makes it easy for all to get along when we have to in relatively small social spaces.

 

The whole topic of this thread is night one. Your examples do not make sense because one, there is no excuse for belligerent behavior. Two, if someone soiled their pants, it can be fixed. However, if someone has not yet received their luggage, it is out of their control and yes, HAL should show some common sense.

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The whole topic of this thread is night one. Your examples do not make sense because one, there is no excuse for belligerent behavior. Two, if someone soiled their pants, it can be fixed. However, if someone has not yet received their luggage, it is out of their control and yes, HAL should show some common sense.

 

I'm not here to argue the "shorts vs. no shorts" position. I could not care less what others do so long as HAL allows it.

 

However, if HAL decided to regularly enforce ANY dress rule, such as "no shorts on first night", I am willing to bet that most folks would quickly learn to adapt and would pack an appropriate outfit in their carry-on should they want to visit the MDR on night one.

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I'm not here to argue the "shorts vs. no shorts" position. I could not care less what others do so long as HAL allows it.

 

However, if HAL decided to regularly enforce ANY dress rule, such as "no shorts on first night", I am willing to bet that most folks would quickly learn to adapt and would pack an appropriate outfit in their carry-on should they want to visit the MDR on night one.

 

 

What she said.

 

(y)

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Well, like I said on the jeans thread, luckily HAL has more common sense for special circumstances than some of the people on this board.

 

 

No kidding. Pack a dinner outfit in your carry on? That’s one of the dumbest things I’ve ever seen suggested on Cruise Critic. Thank goodness these people don’t run the cruise line.

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Should you be allowed to decide whether another patron's table has a table cloth or not? If ambiance makes a fine dining establishment, do you have the right to dictate that others contribute to your ambiance? Why is your ambiance more important than theirs? Why do you allow the clothing choices made by others to determine whether you enjoy your dinner?

 

Not to confirm the relevance of your reply to the content of my post, but to be courteous, here are the answers to your questions, in order:

 

No. No. It isn't. I don't.

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Alright just off b2b on the Eurodam,Shorts are ok on 1st night.There were many.Especially on the 2nd week.After 1st night we did see some people make it in with shorts.But if person seating them saw it they asked them to change.The dressing on Holland is no were near as formal as it use to be,but that seems to be true on all the cruise lines.We had a great time any questions feel free to ask.

 

Tom

 

Thanks for the report.

So, I’ve been reading that the dress code for dinner in the MDR’s is casual. Good to hear that jacket and tie, tuxedos for men, and long gowns for women not required. Enjoy your meal comfortabltly. :)

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Not to confirm the relevance of your reply to the content of my post, but to be courteous, here are the answers to your questions, in order:

 

No. No. It isn't. I don't.

 

Here's your original post:

 

Good point.

 

Putting it another way, why would anyone dressed casually want a tablecloth?

 

I hope someone can answer that.

 

Again, if you're wearing jeans or shorts, would it be ok if your tablecloth was removed? If no, why?

 

Did I misinterpret your original post? It seems to imply that unless one is dressed to a certain standard, they have no right to expect a certain level of ambiance, ie, a tablecloth. Or, even, unless they do dress to a certain level, then it is acceptable to remove their 'ambiance'.

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What does clothing preferences have to do with dining choices?

 

Plus, you do realize that lacy shorts are the in , dressy attire of the day? It’s not considered casual by any means.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

 

Dress Shorts. Would this lady be turned away from dining in the MDR?

Who would complain about her wearing these dress shorts, or attire in the MDR?

54697C35-8939-4E9A-8D5D-61D632BCFF45_zps0bfv2s3m.jpeg

Edited by Kingofcool1947
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No kidding. Pack a dinner outfit in your carry on? That’s one of the dumbest things I’ve ever seen suggested on Cruise Critic. Thank goodness these people don’t run the cruise line.

 

Packing clothes in your carry on isn't practical for everyone.Me, I'm trying to simplify so am only taking a purse(albeit a pretty good sized one but not big enough to pack a change of clothes)on my next cruise.

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Packing clothes in your carry on isn't practical for everyone.Me, I'm trying to simplify so am only taking a purse(albeit a pretty good sized one but not big enough to pack a change of clothes)on my next cruise.

 

I'm with you. My carryon has enough without a change of clothes. In the old days (more days ago than I care to count) when I flew in the same day - yes, I did put in a change of clothes.

 

A decade or so ago, I wizened up and fly in early - 2/3 days pre-cruise at least. If my luggage is lost, delayed, whatever, I have time to shop if need be to "fake it" until it is recovered. ;)

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I'm with you. My carryon has enough without a change of clothes. In the old days (more days ago than I care to count) when I flew in the same day - yes, I did put in a change of clothes.

 

A decade or so ago, I wizened up and fly in early - 2/3 days pre-cruise at least. If my luggage is lost, delayed, whatever, I have time to shop if need be to "fake it" until it is recovered. ;)

 

There is no need to 'fake it'. Nobody is judging you and we already established that 'fashion police' really don't exist on ships.

 

Just be yourself and wear what you can

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I'm with you. My carryon has enough without a change of clothes. In the old days (more days ago than I care to count) when I flew in the same day - yes, I did put in a change of clothes.

 

A decade or so ago, I wizened up and fly in early - 2/3 days pre-cruise at least. If my luggage is lost, delayed, whatever, I have time to shop if need be to "fake it" until it is recovered. ;)

 

 

We always fly to embarkation port at least two or three days in advance.

 

Just because the airline gets the luggage to me at the end of my flight does not mean the cruise line cannot lose it. Sure I have it when I arrive at the cruise terrminal but I don't 'have' it until it has arrived in my cabin. ;)

Edited by sail7seas
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I suggest the moderators make a single thread dealing specifically with dress codes much like the ones for tipping and smoking. What often starts as an innocent question by a HAL newbie always ends up as an unsolvable argument riddled with personal invective.

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