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fyree39

Why did you decide to retire when you did?

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After 38 years in the Fire Service I found myself totally burned out, tired of supervisors who promoted too fast and thought they knew everything-as the "old Dog" I'd tell them to get away from me because experience out weighs book smart when it comes to fire ground tactics, being awaken at all hours of the night for issues that could have been taken care of during daytime hours, whiny new generation employees, political issues in the fire service that were mind boggling and I could go on and on. Retired at age 55, only because my ex got part of my retirement otherwise would have been 50, and now there's no schedule to meet, no whiny employees, people and I can sleep through the night. It's my and my wife's time and we do what we want, she can retire any time after Sept. '18. Travel right now is the #1 priority, plain and simple.

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After 38 years in the Fire Service I found myself totally burned out, tired of supervisors who promoted too fast and thought they knew everything-as the "old Dog" I'd tell them to get away from me because experience out weighs book smart when it comes to fire ground tactics, being awaken at all hours of the night for issues that could have been taken care of during daytime hours, whiny new generation employees, political issues in the fire service that were mind boggling and I could go on and on. Retired at age 55, only because my ex got part of my retirement otherwise would have been 50, and now there's no schedule to meet, no whiny employees, people and I can sleep through the night. It's my and my wife's time and we do what we want, she can retire any time after Sept. '18. Travel right now is the #1 priority, plain and simple.

 

42 years fire service for me with 23 in the big city, last 15 as a Captain. Just turned 60 and leaving in 367 more days! Those "Issues" you mentioned are fire service wide now... especially the young adults! Cant wait to pull the plug, DW leaving city hall job same day as me! Leaving on a Hawaii cruise in a suite a week later! All the best Brother!

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42 years fire service for me with 23 in the big city, last 15 as a Captain. Just turned 60 and leaving in 367 more days! Those "Issues" you mentioned are fire service wide now... especially the young adults! Cant wait to pull the plug, DW leaving city hall job same day as me! Leaving on a Hawaii cruise in a suite a week later! All the best Brother!

 

Your decision to retire is and will be the BEST decision you'll ever make after a long career like ours. It took me almost a year to completely let go/settle in to retirement, something about the adrenalin rush was missing. Last 26 years was running fire crews up and down the mountains of Ca. Enjoy your retirement brother and maybe some day we'll cross paths on a cruise.

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I have the option to retire in April. However, were I to do so, I'd make about 20% less per month. Part of me says it's more important to enjoy my retirement for as long as I can rather than get more money. In either case, I'll be earning enough to live on.

 

 

 

What made you decide it was time?

 

 

 

I simply kept running the numbers starting at age 50 to have a handle on when I was FI to retire even under a bear market. Turned out to be at 55. That’s all I needed to know. I usually enjoyed my job, but never as much as having a relaxing day off.

 

 

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I feel the same way. I have some friends who waited too long to retire and now their health is deteriorating. I retire in July

 

You can always make more money, but you can't make more time.

 

I took an early buyout and retired in my early 50s at 60% of my salary. The bottom line take home, though, was only $500 a month less than when I was working. I never missed it. The week after I retired, I sat down and wrote out my "bucket list" and that was two years before the movie came out and made it a cliché. As I check things off my list, I keep adding to it.

 

I do what I want, when I want, and take as much time to do it as I want. The only person I answer to is She Who Must Be Obeyed. My Sundays are no longer ruined by thoughts of Monday.

 

Most of the time I don't know what day of the week it is, and I don't care.

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I retired at 62 after teaching 39 years in higher education. Our boss the last three years made my work life outside the classroom unbearable. I was being micromanaged after decades of doing things my way. At 62, I had enough years in at the college to retire and keep healthcare for both of us at our usual reasonable rate (last year we both moved to Medicare and they pay for our very good supplement and drug plan). Also, my Dad died at 62 and never did anything but work like crazy all his adult life. So, I retired. We live in a three college town, so there’s always something to do or see, and then there’s travel and cruising.

 

Ironically, the boss mentioned above was fired three months after I retired. Oh well, he was part of the impetus to “say when.” I’m glad I did.

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Good for you. I was an educator too in public education. I feel your pain although I worked with very professional and caring people. I was a special education administrator so my stress came in other ways. Enjoy your well deserved retirement and focus on all the positives now in your life.

 

 

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Hi Internet Whiz. We were on the retirement thread at the same time about 4 years ago. I was an educator too. Common Core was just starting and I seriously hated it. I needed to be 62 and have 25 years to get a good retirement check. I disliked it so much, I took a paraprofessional job in pre-K which cut my salary $2,000 a month for 6 months before I retired. That is how much I wanted to retire!!! Don't miss it a bit. Where I live there is a critical shortage of qualified teachers so retired teachers can go back to work, get full pay, and still get their retirement...sorry, not doing it. And I was teaching at a "good" school.

 

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I'm a Type A personality. Always had difficulty w the occasional lazy co-workers and managers, but was always professional as I needled them about their work habits. Always made every comment in a positive manner. At 57yo, the grapevine told me I was on the list for the next company buyout. At 58yo, the offer came and I had 6 months to study it and determine if I wanted to take the buyout or move to another state within the company. The only other state boiled down to California. We were financially able to retire, it was the Type A that worried the wife. It worried me also. Talked to retired uncles at family reunion. Two great pieces of advice that dovetailed into my personality and talents.

 

Uncle Earl stated you have to work as hard or harder than you did when you had a J.O.B. His theory of those in his generation is that those who sat in recliner and watched John Wayne and Clint Eastwood reruns two days/week died a decade or more sooner than those who stayed active physically and mentally.

 

Uncle Rupert said that being 58yo, I'm young enough to make most changes on our home to allow us to live here into our late 70s, maybe longer barring the unforeseen and God willing. So I have spent 5 years doing almost all maintenance and structural type changes like drip watering systems in all flower beds, expanding flowerbeds to mitigate lawn care, Cathedral ceilings are always painted w 2 coats with expectation that future painting or color change painting will be walls only., replacing all lighting with LED lights retro kits or LED bulbs, will be replacing tub/shower in master bath with a 3 inch threshold shower w built in seat.

 

Don't forget to volunteer at church and County recycle turn-in days.

 

The hardest part are hearing the "what do you do all day" questions. The answer is usually easy, I pull out the smartphone and read off the items I had accomplished that day. I do embellish also. Think of it this way, when we worked Saturday was always my hardest day because I usually spent the day doing all the work I couldn't accomplish during the week. Being retired, your week consists of 6 Saturdays and Sunday for church and rest.

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I retired at 62 after teaching 39 years in higher education. Our boss the last three years made my work life outside the classroom unbearable. I was being micromanaged after decades of doing things my way. At 62, I had enough years in at the college to retire and keep healthcare for both of us at our usual reasonable rate (last year we both moved to Medicare and they pay for our very good supplement and drug plan). Also, my Dad died at 62 and never did anything but work like crazy all his adult life. So, I retired. We live in a three college town, so there’s always something to do or see, and then there’s travel and cruising.

 

Ironically, the boss mentioned above was fired three months after I retired. Oh well, he was part of the impetus to “say when.” I’m glad I did.

 

Good for you and your retirement. I also see you have been on quite a few cruises and you will be sailing on Royal Caribbeans new ship. That ship will be based in Asia; is that correct?

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I'm a Type A personality. Always had difficulty w the occasional lazy co-workers and managers, but was always professional as I needled them about their work habits. Always made every comment in a positive manner. At 57yo, the grapevine told me I was on the list for the next company buyout. At 58yo, the offer came and I had 6 months to study it and determine if I wanted to take the buyout or move to another state within the company. The only other state boiled down to California. We were financially able to retire, it was the Type A that worried the wife. It worried me also. Talked to retired uncles at family reunion. Two great pieces of advice that dovetailed into my personality and talents.

 

Uncle Earl stated you have to work as hard or harder than you did when you had a J.O.B. His theory of those in his generation is that those who sat in recliner and watched John Wayne and Clint Eastwood reruns two days/week died a decade or more sooner than those who stayed active physically and mentally.

 

Uncle Rupert said that being 58yo, I'm young enough to make most changes on our home to allow us to live here into our late 70s, maybe longer barring the unforeseen and God willing. So I have spent 5 years doing almost all maintenance and structural type changes like drip watering systems in all flower beds, expanding flowerbeds to mitigate lawn care, Cathedral ceilings are always painted w 2 coats with expectation that future painting or color change painting will be walls only., replacing all lighting with LED lights retro kits or LED bulbs, will be replacing tub/shower in master bath with a 3 inch threshold shower w built in seat.

 

Don't forget to volunteer at church and County recycle turn-in days.

 

The hardest part are hearing the "what do you do all day" questions. The answer is usually easy, I pull out the smartphone and read off the items I had accomplished that day. I do embellish also. Think of it this way, when we worked Saturday was always my hardest day because I usually spent the day doing all the work I couldn't accomplish during the week. Being retired, your week consists of 6 Saturdays and Sunday for church and rest.

 

Congrats on your retirement. Like you I have lots to do when I retire next month; and I am looking forward to being able to play in our church praise band more. I travel every week and can only be at church to play drums with the band every other Sunday. But after next month that all changes. Cheers

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This question has so many variables.

 

For me, I'm not sure I'll ever retire. I have a pretty cushie job (except for a long commute) and I can take my vacation time whenever I want. Why retire??

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This question has so many variables.

 

For me, I'm not sure I'll ever retire. I have a pretty cushie job (except for a long commute) and I can take my vacation time whenever I want. Why retire??

My job is 7 minutes from my house, with no freeways, 2 stoplights and a manned gate. I get 5 weeks vacation per year that I use whenever I feel like it and they pay me way too much for what I do.

 

And I still hate working for a living. ;p

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Hi.. Easy for me to decide. I'm retired USAF and US Postal Service. Don't make enough to make us rich, but, 41 years with the Govt. is enough for anyone. Retired 5 days before I turned 62. So, at 62 applied for Soc. Sec. Now, travel, cruises, bike trips, wife from the Philippines. So, lot of trips over there.. Main thing is we're HAPPY. That's what counts.. Wishbone aka Gil

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Hi.. Easy for me to decide. I'm retired USAF and US Postal Service. Don't make enough to make us rich, but, 41 years with the Govt. is enough for anyone. Retired 5 days before I turned 62. So, at 62 applied for Soc. Sec. Now, travel, cruises, bike trips, wife from the Philippines. So, lot of trips over there.. Main thing is we're HAPPY. That's what counts.. Wishbone aka Gil

 

Did you retire out of Warner Robbins; I retired from Andrews

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I was planning to retire in January, but the verbal bullying from our leadership is making me miserable. I'm considering moving the retirement date up to September even though I'll have to live off my personal funds for 10 months since I won't apply for SS till next July. Quality of life is becoming more important than a paycheck. :o

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It makes me sad that you are in this situation. Come September, since you will have nothing to lose, you might consider giving some of their own grief back. Document the harassment and turn it over to the proper people. Even if you don't make your situation better, you may help your fellow workers.

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I was planning to retire in January, but the verbal bullying from our leadership is making me miserable. I'm considering moving the retirement date up to September even though I'll have to live off my personal funds for 10 months since I won't apply for SS till next July. Quality of life is becoming more important than a paycheck. :o

I work(ed) for the federal government. The bureaucracy can be annoying, but the good thing is there are safety nets in place to protect workers from this type of behavior. I work(ed) for a bully, one who threatens us with standing before him explaining why we didn't do it his way, but the bullying doesn't work on me. Do you know how hard it is to fire a federal employee? ;p I let his idiotic threats roll off my back and do my job sans his interference.

 

I wish everyone could enjoy that type of freedom. (((Go-Bucks)))

 

Next week is my final week and I'm so ready for it!

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Both wife and I retired early to take care of her aging parents (both recently deceased) so really the decision was pretty much a no brainer. Sometimes life gets in the way of one's plan. No regrets. Now catching up on some missed (and some cancelled) trips.

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I was planning to retire in January, but the verbal bullying from our leadership is making me miserable. I'm considering moving the retirement date up to September even though I'll have to live off my personal funds for 10 months since I won't apply for SS till next July. Quality of life is becoming more important than a paycheck. :o

 

I agree; quality of life is the most important

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We retired when we did for three reasons. Main reason was we had the funds/pension to retire. Second reason is we wanted to travel. Third reason is I wanted a German Shepherd Dog ASAP, but after we did most of our traveling. All was proceeding as scheduled until I checked the local animal shelter. Saw a GSD and long story short I have my dog, and we don't travel as much as we wanted to. Oh well, I don't regret it for one moment.

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We probably had enough to retire on 3 to 5 years before I retired, but I was enjoying my job and had some projects underway that I really wanted to finish. Also, I wanted to have more margin before retiring. I knew some people who retired in 2007 and then worried a lot when they took a hit from the recession in 2008. It is a bit jarring when you go to Best Buy at the holiday season and see your colleague working there because their retirement wasn't as secure as they thought.

 

Around fall of 2016, I was finishing the projects that I really wanted to complete and started feeling like I was mentally ready. We were in good financial position for it. My husband was turning 70 in 2017 and would start collecting his Social Security. In 2018, I would reach full retirement age and could start collecting my spousal SS with a restricted application (that's been sunsetted so it isn't available for those born after 1953) and then switch to my own SS when I turned 70.

 

It made sense to wait until I turned 65 in the summer of 2017 so I could go directly from my employee insurance to Medicare. That was initially the date I was thinking of retiring. However, employee bonus is in December and I had deferred compensation that would vest in March. I decided to wait for those and then retire when the next bonus was 9 months away rather than just around the corner.

 

I retired in early April to get employee medical coverage for the whole of April and started Medicare in May.

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Retired at 69. Got tired of the stress. Haven’t regretted one minute. It takes a leep of faith. DH had retired at 56.

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In 2018, I would reach full retirement age and could start collecting my spousal SS with a restricted application (that's been sunsetted so it isn't available for those born after 1953) and then switch to my own SS when I turned 70.

That's what I'll be doing...having my SS based on my ex-hubby's income, which has always been higher than mine. I just squeaked under the deadline, having a 1953 birthday! Since I'll only get 1/2 of his, I'll have to kick in a little of my 401K money, but then at 70 I can get my highest amount. Good plan!! ;)

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retired when the company basically said "if you are 55 and older and have been here for 20 years or more then take this offer or we will lay you off" - I was 60 and had been there 35 so away I left.

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