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Abbreviations/Acronyms! Look up here before asking.

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On 1/30/2018 at 7:44 AM, Jim and Monika said:

 

People will still post and ask because you never said what XYZ means...

It is the last three letters of the alphabet for those intellectually challenged enquirers.

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On 1/30/2018 at 11:52 PM, RickeyandTabatha said:

When you introduce your significant other do you say “ hi this is my dear husband /wife “ oh ok I didn’t think so !

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

I never refer to my wife as a 'significant' (or insignificant)  'other'.  An 'other' to me is usually an innanimate object not a person I care for very much.  She's special.  She's my wife.  Always.

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On 8/26/2018 at 4:49 PM, Heidi13 said:

 

Totally agree. While a few acronyms are are specific to Cruise Critic, others such as DH, DW, SIL, DIL, etc are widely used on other forums.

 

The marine industry also has many industry specific words - galley, deck, bulkheads, etc learning these terms should be part of the cruising experience.

I once talked to a TA about booking a stern cabin.  She couldn't figure that out.  She insisted on talking about port and starboard cabins.  Apparently she was not familiar with terms like bow and stern.

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On 2/18/2018 at 8:43 PM, bakersdozen12 said:

Actually, YTD stands for “Your Time Dining.”

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

Or perhaps; Year to Date

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On 7/7/2019 at 4:04 AM, 1980dory said:

I never refer to my wife as a 'significant' (or insignificant)  'other'.  An 'other' to me is usually an innanimate object not a person I care for very much.  She's special.  She's my wife.  Always.

 

So there is no such thing as an Other Person?

 

SO is short hand for Significant Other Person.  

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On 7/7/2019 at 4:16 AM, 1980dory said:

I once talked to a TA about booking a stern cabin.  She couldn't figure that out.  She insisted on talking about port and starboard cabins.  Apparently she was not familiar with terms like bow and stern.

 

Because the term used in cruising is an AFT cabin.

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3 hours ago, SRF said:

 

Because the term used in cruising is an AFT cabin.

Aft is a 'direction' and can refer to either port or starboard.

'Stern' is a specific location, as is 'bow'.

My information is based on many years as a sailor and with numerous certified sailing courses completed.
If the term is used in cruising, it is erroneous and causes confusion because it is incorrect and nondescriptive of the stern.

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On 7/9/2019 at 7:16 AM, 1980dory said:

Aft is a 'direction' and can refer to either port or starboard.

'Stern' is a specific location, as is 'bow'.

My information is based on many years as a sailor and with numerous certified sailing courses completed.
If the term is used in cruising, it is erroneous and causes confusion because it is incorrect and nondescriptive of the stern.

 

You should see what happens around here when people call it a "boat."  😉

 

But yes, you are correct.  Aft is a direction, not a location.  

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On 7/9/2019 at 5:16 PM, 1980dory said:

Aft is a 'direction' and can refer to either port or starboard.

'Stern' is a specific location, as is 'bow'.

My information is based on many years as a sailor and with numerous certified sailing courses completed.
If the term is used in cruising, it is erroneous and causes confusion because it is incorrect and nondescriptive of the stern.

 

Yes, it is proper usage, because the cabin balconies FACE AFT. 😄

 

 

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8 hours ago, Aquahound said:

 

You should see what happens around here when people call it a "boat."  😉

 

But yes, you are correct.  Aft is a direction, not a location.  

Paul

Thank you.  I think I have had enough of this 'discussion'.  Let's move on to the 'boat' question, and from there we can discuss tips, smuggling booze and other stimulating subjects.

Paul

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4 hours ago, 1980dory said:

Paul

Thank you.  I think I have had enough of this 'discussion'.  Let's move on to the 'boat' question, and from there we can discuss tips, smuggling booze and other stimulating subjects.

Paul

If you are sure just ask you cabin Stewart. 😜

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On 7/9/2019 at 10:25 AM, SRF said:

 

Because the term used in cruising is an AFT cabin.

 

On 7/9/2019 at 2:16 PM, 1980dory said:

Aft is a 'direction' and can refer to either port or starboard.

'Stern' is a specific location, as is 'bow'.

My information is based on many years as a sailor and with numerous certified sailing courses completed.
If the term is used in cruising, it is erroneous and causes confusion because it is incorrect and nondescriptive of the stern.

No, as used by SRF, the term is correct.  "Aft" can be an adjective (modifying a noun), such as "I want an aft cabin", meaning I want one aft of midships, or "take the aft staircase".  Or, "aft" can be an adverb (modifying a verb), such as "I am moving aft", with aft modifying the verb "moving" by giving a direction.  Your choice of "stern" cabin is also appropriate, but it specifies a much smaller group of cabins than "aft".  What is frequently misused here on CC is using "aft" as a noun, "show us your aft", "I want a cabin at the aft".

 

And my information is based on 45 years at sea.

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On 7/6/2019 at 9:16 PM, 1980dory said:

I once talked to a TA about booking a stern cabin.  She couldn't figure that out.  She insisted on talking about port and starboard cabins.  Apparently she was not familiar with terms like bow and stern.

Stern is not where a cabin would be. Aft section would be correct. Bow is the very front tip of a ship Stern is the very back of the ship. The name of the ship is on the stern. Not an area.

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1 hour ago, twodaywonder said:

Stern is not where a cabin would be. Aft section would be correct. Bow is the very front tip of a ship Stern is the very back of the ship. The name of the ship is on the stern. Not an area.

 

Thank you for your clarification of where I was.  But we could sure see the wake from our balcony, stern cabin which was neither on the port or starboard sides.

Getting a bit nit picking from  my original statement re. port and starboard cabins.

But if it's all THAT important to you, go for it.

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16 hours ago, 1980dory said:

 

Thank you for your clarification of where I was.  But we could sure see the wake from our balcony, stern cabin which was neither on the port or starboard sides.

Getting a bit nit picking from  my original statement re. port and starboard cabins.

But if it's all THAT important to you, go for it.

From you cabin you could see the stern. You were in the furthest aft cabin. Definition. "The stern is the back side of a ship or boat. It is the exact opposite end of the boat from the bow, or front. The stern is built over a part of the ship known as a sternpost, which is a structural beam over which the transom , or back end, of the ship is built". I did make an error before. The transom is where the name of the ship painted. The stern is the very back section of the ship.

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On ‎1‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 8:58 AM, beerman2 said:

 

People can't be THAT dumb, can they😂

You have never had the pleasure of working in costumer service.... LOL never underestimate the stupidity... Also first post ever and 1st time cruiser in Jan. 2020!!! :classic_love: 

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1 hour ago, MrsDuffy21502 said:

You have never had the pleasure of working in costumer service.... LOL never underestimate the stupidity... Also first post ever and 1st time cruiser in Jan. 2020!!! :classic_love: 

 

 

Lets move on to a discussion of cabin stewarts or stewartesses.  Or better yet; let's talk about the differences in you,  you are,

you're and your.  This is going to be fun!  I'm sure there are many experts out there.

Costumer service.  Is that a theatrical enterprise?  I'm sorry Mrs. Duffy.  I just couldn't help it.  You have to see the lighter side of life.  In the end, it all just doesn't matter.  Have fun now and never get too serious!

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On 7/10/2019 at 10:45 PM, Aquahound said:

 

 

But yes, you are correct.  Aft is a direction, not a location.  

 

It can also mean in or regarding the rear of the boat.   But the key is it is an ADJECTIVE not a noun.  The back of the boat is the STERN.

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On 7/10/2019 at 7:45 PM, Aquahound said:

 

You should see what happens around here when people call it a "boat."  😉

 

Generally, large ships like a cruise ship are not referred to as boats. 🙂

however, the exception is, THIS is definitely a "boat":
319676221_floridagoingtonewhomeport.thumb.jpg.c0a630241763e1d4aadc17e6549c6a1c.jpg

 

Reason we submariners refer to them as boats is that the first submarines were very small and made of wood. The pic above is my first boat, USS Florida SSBN-728 (Submersible Ship, Ballistic missiles, Nuclear powered, hull 728). 560 feet long with 100 enlisted people and 20 officers. The enlisted sleep in bunkrooms the size of an office cubicle that hold 9 people, and the officers sleep in staterooms, again the size of an office cubicle, that hold up to 3 officers, and have room for two fold out desks. The above is a ship, but we never call it that; we call it a boat. If you want to be punched, go on a submarine and tell a Qualified member of the crew that his (or her, now...I supported females on submarines so I'm glad about that) boat is a ship, lol. It's a boat. 🙂 In this pic, the Officer of the Deck would be standing on the rectangular part coming out of the front, where you can see the US Flag...that's the "sail". I've stood many watches as Lookout, standing up there with the OOD. It's a great ride up there. 🙂

 

In the Revolutionary War, a single person submarine was built for the purpose of putting a bomb under a British ship and destroying her. Definitely a boat, because it had to be taken to the area of use by a larger ship and dropped in the water.

pic of the turtle

 

In 1861, the Navy built one made of iron which was 47 feet long and driven by oars and a hand-cranked propeller. That was USS Alligator. But the USS Alligator was lost at sea...to go long distances she needed to be towed by a larger ship, and one time they were in rough waters and the towing line snapped, and the Alligator was lost, all hands presumed dead because the boat has never been found.

The first one that could go long distances under her own power was USS Holland SS-1 (Submersible Ship, hull number 1).

 

USS_Holland_SS-1.gif.035c7d3fd8eba3de3cdfff37dcb04937.gif

 

A little more room than the Alligator, and could go under her own power; she had a gasoline engine, and batteries for running while submerged.

An interesting thing about this boat is that there's a photo of the most senior enlisted man, a chief (E-7), and on the back, someone wrote (back in 1900), "This is the Chief of the Boat". The name stuck and even today, the most senior enlisted man or woman on a USN submarine is called "Chief of the Boat" or "COB". It's a formal position now, and it's always held by a Master Chief Petty Officer (E-9). 🙂

Edited by neutrino78x

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On 7/30/2019 at 9:01 AM, twodaywonder said:

 The transom is where the name of the ship painted. The stern is the very back section of the ship.

Transom, interesting, never heard that one before. We don't have that on submarines (see my pic above). 🙂 Thanks shipmate, I'll have to remember that one! 🙂 And, thank you for your service 🙂

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On 1/17/2020 at 2:15 AM, neutrino78x said:

Transom, interesting, never heard that one before. We don't have that on submarines (see my pic above). 🙂 Thanks shipmate, I'll have to remember that one! 🙂 And, thank you for your service 🙂

Well, I know he/she will get upset with me disagreeing with him/her, but saying the "transom" is where the ship's name is painted is not quite correct.  If a boat or ship has a flat or nearly flat vertical (or nearly vertical) surface forming the stern, then that is a transom, but rounded sterns can have the ship's name on them, and they are not transoms.  Most cruise ships have some form of transom stern, but for instance the QM2, Disney Wonder, and the Oasis class ships do not.

 

And, even using the definition of "stern" as being above or behind the sternpost (the aftermost vertical member of the hull below the water), cabins can be in the "stern", since particularly on ships with azipods the aftermost part of the hull is a horizontal flat surface above the azipods, so any cabin above or aft of the azipods would be "in the stern".  Ships with shafted props will also have the "sternpost" a good ways forward on the hull, so the aftermost cabins will be "in the stern".

Edited by chengkp75

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4 hours ago, chengkp75 said:

Well, I know he/she will get upset with me disagreeing with him/her, but saying the "transom" is where the ship's name is painted is not quite correct.  If a boat or ship has a flat or nearly flat vertical (or nearly vertical) surface forming the stern, then that is a transom, but rounded sterns can have the ship's name on them, and they are not transoms.  Most cruise ships have some form of transom stern, but for instance the QM2, Disney Wonder, and the Oasis class ships do not.

 

And, even using the definition of "stern" as being above or behind the sternpost (the aftermost vertical member of the hull below the water), cabins can be in the "stern", since particularly on ships with azipods the aftermost part of the hull is a horizontal flat surface above the azipods, so any cabin above or aft of the azipods would be "in the stern".  Ships with shafted props will also have the "sternpost" a good ways forward on the hull, so the aftermost cabins will be "in the stern".

Most cruise ships have some form of transom stern, but for instance the QM2, Disney Wonder, and the Oasis class ships do not. So what do you call it?

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This looks like the answer.

A transom, a critical part of the hull, is the wide, usually flat area at the very back of a yacht or boat. This is also where you usually find the name of the yacht.

It may be:

Curved or flat
Vertical
Angling forward
Raked forward (reverse transom or retroussé)
Or angling in the other direction
Transom stern - If the bottom tip of the transom on the waterline.

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