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annie0501

Travelling to NE and Canada with mobility scooter

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We are doing a fall cruise (again) north from Baltimore stopping at Boston, Bar Harbor, Portland, St. John, and Halifax. I have really been looking for info I can use in touring Boston in a mobility scooter. I cannot do steps. Is there anything I can do right around Black Falcon port in Boston that would make it worth getting off the ship? Thanks for any help you can offer!

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The Old Town Trolley Tours stop is about 100 yards from the cruise ship terminal. They have lifts on some of their buses. You should speak to them directly by phone before your trip to be sure that there is one available at the time you will want to go.

 

I would NOT recommend doing it as a hop-on-hop off tour though...just take the round trip route, which will take you about 2.5 hours. You will see a lot of Boston, and the drivers do a continuous narration of the sights being passed. Buy your tickets on-line before the trip.

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It is very doubtful that you will be able to go ashore in Bar Harbor. That is a tender port. For the other ports, depending on your willingness to use public transportation, you can see a lot. Please refer to Google maps for reference points and enlarge map enough to identify the bus stops.

Boston: The last time I checked with the ho ho bus, they would not allow mobility scooters on. However, the public buses are accessible. The metro is also accessible, however, you have to contact someone for a flat ramp getting in and out. We took flying leaps, not recommended. Taking the bus, you will be able to see a number of the Freedom Trail sights. Take the #4 bus from Summer St @ Drydock Ave. (near the cruise terminal) to Commercial St. opp. Hull St. Then just follow Hull St. south to Old North Church (you will pass Copp's Hill on the way). From the Old North Church just follow the Freedom Trail to Boston Common. If someone is walking with you, the total distance is approximately 1 ¾ miles. From there, go to South Station where you will catch the SL2 bus and get off at Drydock Ave @ Design Center Place. Notes: On your way to catch the bus, check the stop at Drydock Ave @ Harbor St. That is where we caught the bus, however, it is not currently marked on map as wheelchair accessible. Going back to the ship, you may have to ask where to catch the SL2 bus at South Station.

Halifax you can easily follow the Ocean walk and see a lot in the town. However, unless you are a feather weight, I doubt that your batteries would get you to the Halifax Citadel. That is hill takes a lot of battery power. To get to the citadel, you can catch either the 7 or 41 bus to Gottingen St After Cogswell St (north of the citadel) and enter the grounds through the north entrance. Heading back to the ship, take the south exit from the citadel and as you exit the grounds make a couple left turns heading north on Brunswick St. to the Clock Tower. Turn right at the tower and follow street downhill to the Ocean Walk. That will take you past most of the sights in town to where you head south on the Ocean Walk back to the ship.

St. John we just wandered around town. There are also some hills there.

In Portland we just made a big loop; went over to Congress St., headed southwest and crossed over to Commercial St. going back to the ship.

If you can get ashore in Bar Harbor, we took a “Lobster tour boat” tour. I think it was Lulu Lobster boat. They secured our scooters in the dock area and assisted us on and off the boat. It was fairly close to the tender dock. Getting up the hill into the town area could be another challenge for the batteries. There is a nice park if you just want to wander around the port area.

Have a wonderful trip,

Betty

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It is very doubtful that you will be able to go ashore in Bar Harbor. That is a tender port. For the other ports, depending on your willingness to use public transportation, you can see a lot. Please refer to Google maps for reference points and enlarge map enough to identify the bus stops.

Boston: The last time I checked with the ho ho bus, they would not allow mobility scooters on. However, the public buses are accessible. The metro is also accessible, however, you have to contact someone for a flat ramp getting in and out. We took flying leaps, not recommended. Taking the bus, you will be able to see a number of the Freedom Trail sights. Take the #4 bus from Summer St @ Drydock Ave. (near the cruise terminal) to Commercial St. opp. Hull St. Then just follow Hull St. south to Old North Church (you will pass Copp's Hill on the way). From the Old North Church just follow the Freedom Trail to Boston Common. If someone is walking with you, the total distance is approximately 1 ¾ miles. From there, go to South Station where you will catch the SL2 bus and get off at Drydock Ave @ Design Center Place. Notes: On your way to catch the bus, check the stop at Drydock Ave @ Harbor St. That is where we caught the bus, however, it is not currently marked on map as wheelchair accessible. Going back to the ship, you may have to ask where to catch the SL2 bus at South Station.

Halifax you can easily follow the Ocean walk and see a lot in the town. However, unless you are a feather weight, I doubt that your batteries would get you to the Halifax Citadel. That is hill takes a lot of battery power. To get to the citadel, you can catch either the 7 or 41 bus to Gottingen St After Cogswell St (north of the citadel) and enter the grounds through the north entrance. Heading back to the ship, take the south exit from the citadel and as you exit the grounds make a couple left turns heading north on Brunswick St. to the Clock Tower. Turn right at the tower and follow street downhill to the Ocean Walk. That will take you past most of the sights in town to where you head south on the Ocean Walk back to the ship.

St. John we just wandered around town. There are also some hills there.

In Portland we just made a big loop; went over to Congress St., headed southwest and crossed over to Commercial St. going back to the ship.

If you can get ashore in Bar Harbor, we took a “Lobster tour boat” tour. I think it was Lulu Lobster boat. They secured our scooters in the dock area and assisted us on and off the boat. It was fairly close to the tender dock. Getting up the hill into the town area could be another challenge for the batteries. There is a nice park if you just want to wander around the port area.

Have a wonderful trip,

Betty

 

Betty

 

Not certain the last time you were in Boston, but I've been there in 2010, 2012, 2014 and was able to ride the HOHO Trolley with my scooter every time. Not all of the Trolleys have a lift and Trolleys with lifts don't stop everywhere along the route. However it's easily done. The important thing to note is to not purchase a ticket on board the cruise ship nor wait for the port day to get off the ship to purchase a ticket that morning. The OP really needs to contact the company in advance as they need to know a information up front as to date and time of arrival. Here's the link https://www.trolleytours.com/boston/accessibility-services

 

Pat

 

To OP - Betty's information regarding the other ports is exactly what I would have said.

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I would also add that Portland's sidewalks, in the downtown area, tend to be either cobblestone or brick, and the Maine winters are not friendly to them, so unless your scooter has an "off road" suspension :D, it may be a rough ride. Portland is also primarily a peninsula, with a ridge down the middle, so there is a lot of up hill and down hill.

 

One thing you might want to try, depending on what your interests are, is the Eastern Prom. There is a paved trail (turn right outside the terminal) that takes you to Fort Allen Park and to the Eastern Prom park and Eastend Beach. You get a great view down Casco Bay, and you can cut uphill to the Eastern Prom itself, and see some of the grand old houses of Portland.

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Thanks all. I talked with the Trolley people on Friday and they said no to scooters (yes to wheelchairs). I have bad memories of trying to navigate in Disneyworld using their bus system. Was it hard to get on/off? Is there anything immediately around the ship worth looking at?

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Thanks all. I talked with the Trolley people on Friday and they said no to scooters (yes to wheelchairs). I have bad memories of trying to navigate in Disneyworld using their bus system. Was it hard to get on/off? Is there anything immediately around the ship worth looking at?

 

Would call back and speak to a Supervisor. The Boston Trolly accepted my scooter on all three past NE Cruises. Being that some of the Trolley's have an accessible lift by limiting it only to wheelchair violates ADA and if it were me I'd point that out to them.

 

Nothing worthwhile around the port.

 

 

You can always arrange for a WAV https://www.boston.gov/departments/disabilities-commission/wav-taxi-cabs-wheelchair-accessible-vehicles and go to specific area of interest.

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At one time Old Town Trolley had posted a weight limit for the lift. Like Pat suggested, call back and explain that you use a small travel mobility scooter and give them the approximate weight. The other trolley company does not stop near the cruise terminal.

Both Ruth and I required scooters and we did not experience any problems using the public buses in Boston. The bus stops are well marked and just tell the driver where you want off. The metro was a different story. It was not easy to maneuver.

Oh, Disneyland and Disney World are challenges getting around in any manner. Do not think I would visit either one with a scooter.

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We have a private tour booked in Bar Harbor - the tender port. We now have one person in our group recovering from a hip replacement. She is using a walker and occasional wheel chair. Is there any handicap accessible/helpful way to get on the tender or is she stuck on the ship that day?

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IF the day has good weather and the seas are calm it is possible you will be able to tender. The ship reserves the right to deny tender use if it the transfer cannot be done safely. I have a very small (35 lb) scooter and have never been refused. That said I do have to walk down into the tender and back up at the dock. This is becoming more difficult so I don't know if I would try it. I vaguely remember doing about 5 or so steps as the tender rises and falls with the waves. The crew will not lift you on your scooter into the tender (nor should they) nor will they lift the scooter if it is more than 50 or lbs. It would be helpful to know what ship you are sailing on. A few lines have tenders that are equipped for wheelchair/scooter use.

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Betty

 

 

 

Not certain the last time you were in Boston, but I've been there in 2010, 2012, 2014 and was able to ride the HOHO Trolley with my scooter every time. Not all of the Trolleys have a lift and Trolleys with lifts don't stop everywhere along the route. However it's easily done. The important thing to note is to not purchase a ticket on board the cruise ship nor wait for the port day to get off the ship to purchase a ticket that morning. The OP really needs to contact the company in advance as they need to know a information up front as to date and time of arrival. Here's the link https://www.trolleytours.com/boston/accessibility-services

 

 

 

Pat

 

 

 

To OP - Betty's information regarding the other ports is exactly what I would have said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

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In Boston the Harpoon Brewery is approximately 6 blocks from the port. Easily accessible by scooter from Black Falcon. Nice 45 minute tour, very industrial. Large bar area, tables, pretzels, gift shop. Goggle Harpoon Brewery. About 2 blocks further is a store front cafe called Lobster Roll. Decent.

 

Not your typical sightseeing but something enjoyable to do on the scooter and fills the day. Vicki

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

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Halifax is great for scooters. There is a lovely shopping area right where the ship docks and a very long wooden deck that goes to all kinds of restaurants and shops. So easy and great views all along that area.

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