Jump to content

Transpacific cruise from Sydney to Hawaii - port or starboard side?


BrookeJ75
 Share

Recommended Posts

Because your route is at a northerly angle:

Starboard side gets the sun in the morning.

Port side gets the sun in the afternoon.

That's what you can consider for sea days, which my guess is they well outnumber port days.

 

But since you asked about port days: do you have a preference as to whether your balcony faces the port or out to sea when you are docked? Usually there is no way to predict this. And a large ship sailing the South Pacific will likely be tendering at somewhere around half the port calls anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because your route is at a northerly angle:

Starboard side gets the sun in the morning.

Port side gets the sun in the afternoon.

That's what you can consider for sea days, which my guess is they well outnumber port days.

 

But since you asked about port days: do you have a preference as to whether your balcony faces the port or out to sea when you are docked? Usually there is no way to predict this. And a large ship sailing the South Pacific will likely be tendering at somewhere around half the port calls anyway.

 

 

 

Side for the ports is irrelevant.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Flip a coin. It's pretty rare that you can predict how a ship will dock. Some docks are parallel with the port. Some docks are perpendicular. Sometimes they dock nose in. Sometimes they dock back in. Sometimes they're tendered (don't dock at all). So not something that factors into cabin selection for us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding ports -- it's a coin flip, no one knows for sure until they're pulling into port. Regarding the position of the sun -- it's a coin flip, since you're crossing the equator about half way along.

 

What does crossing the equator have to do with the sun? The sun will still rise in the east and set in the west. EM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What does crossing the equator have to do with the sun? The sun will still rise in the east and set in the west. EM

Yes, but the sun is never directly overhead unless you are on the equator......in the northern hemisphere, the sun is always a little to the south, and in the southern hemisphere, the sun is always a little to the north. How far north or south it is depends on how far you are from the equator, and whether it's winter or summer. So, if you're traveling eastward between NY and Europe, for instance, the sun will rise and fall on the starboard side of the ship and the port side will have more shade. If you're traveling eastward between Argentina and South Africa, the sun will primarily rise and set on the port side of the ship, and the starboard side will get more shade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, but the sun is never directly overhead unless you are on the equator......in the northern hemisphere, the sun is always a little to the south, and in the southern hemisphere, the sun is always a little to the north. How far north or south it is depends on how far you are from the equator, and whether it's winter or summer. So, if you're traveling eastward between NY and Europe, for instance, the sun will rise and fall on the starboard side of the ship and the port side will have more shade. If you're traveling eastward between Argentina and South Africa, the sun will primarily rise and set on the port side of the ship, and the starboard side will get more shade.

 

 

 

Not exactly true unless you’re at ‘higher’ latitudes. Whether the sun is north or south of you depends on your location and the time of the year (the declination of the sun). In April on a trip from Australia to Hawaii, the sun will be in a northerly direction when starting out (since the sun has a north declination) and will be overhead sometime after crossing the equator and will be to the south upon arrival in Hawaii.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not exactly true unless you’re at ‘higher’ latitudes. Whether the sun is north or south of you depends on your location and the time of the year (the declination of the sun). In April on a trip from Australia to Hawaii, the sun will be in a northerly direction when starting out (since the sun has a north declination) and will be overhead sometime after crossing the equator and will be to the south upon arrival in Hawaii.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

 

thanks cool cruiser. So based on previous comments does that mean it will be starboard in the morning before equator then port afterwards?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks cool cruiser. So based on previous comments does that mean it will be starboard in the morning before equator then port afterwards?

 

 

 

Since the ship will be heading in a generally NE direction it really won’t make a whole lot of difference which side you’re on as far as the amount of sunshine you’ll get. Of course, in the morning the sun will rise on the starboard side of the ship and the port side will get more sunshine in later in the morning and for the remainder of the day. Since you’ll be spending so much time in the tropics, I don’t think it’ll make much difference from a temperature perspective but if you’re looking to lie out on your balcony and tan (or burn, as the case may be), you should probably go with the port side.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Forums

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • Holiday Exchange - Jingle and Mingle 2021
      • ANNOUNCEMENT: Enjoy the Gift of Travel with Regent Seven Seas Cruises
      • Cruise Critic Live Special Event: Q&A with Silversea Cruises Nov 29th at 3 p.m. EST
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...